• We characterize the spatial density of the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) sample of RR Lyrae stars, to study the properties of the old Galactic stellar halo as traced by RRab stars. This sample of 44,403 sources spans Galactocentric radii of $0.55 \; \mathrm{kpc} \leq R_{\mathrm{gc}} \leq 141 \; \mathrm{kpc}$ with a distance precision of 3\% and thus is able to trace the halo out to larger distances than most previous studies. After excising stars that are attributed to dense regions such as stellar streams, the Galactic disc and bulge as well as halo globular clusters, the sample contains ${\sim}11,000$ sources within $20 \; \mathrm{kpc} \leq R_{\mathrm{gc}} \leq 131 \; \mathrm{kpc}$. We then apply forward modeling using ellipsoidal stellar density models $\rho(l,b,R_{\mathrm{gc}})$ both with a constant and a radius-dependent halo flattening $q(R_{\mathrm{gc}})$. Assuming constant flattening $q$, the distribution of the sources is reasonably well fit from $20 \; \mathrm{kpc}$ to $131 \; \mathrm{kpc}$ by a single power law with $n=4.40^{+0.05}_{-0.04}$ and $q=0.918^{+0.016}_{-0.014}$. The distance distribution is fit comparably well by an Einasto profile with $n=9.53^{+0.27}_{-0.28}$, an effective radius $r_{\mathrm{eff}}=1.07 \pm 0.10 \; \mathrm{kpc}$ and a halo flattening of $q=0.923 \pm 0.007$. If we allow for a radius-dependent flattening $q(R_{\mathrm{gc}})$, we find evidence for a distinct flattening of $q{\sim}0.8$ of the inner halo at ${\sim} 25 \; \mathrm{kpc}$. Additionally, we find that the south Galactic hemisphere is more flattened than the north Galactic hemisphere. The results of our work are largely consistent with many earlier results, e.g. \cite{Watkins2009}, \cite{Iorio2017}. We find that the stellar halo, as traced in RR Lyrae stars, exhibits a substantial number of further significant over- and underdensities, even after all known overdensities have been masked.
  • We determine magnesium isotopic abundances of metal poor dwarf stars from the galactic halo, to shed light on the onset of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star nucleossynthesis in the galactic halo and constrain the timescale of its formation. We observed a sample of eight new halo K dwarfs in a metallicity range of -1.9 < [Fe/H] < -0.9 and 4200 < $T_{eff}$(K) < 4950, using the HIRES spectrograph at the Keck Observatory (R~10^5 and 200 < S/N < 300). We obtain magnesium isotopic abundances by spectral synthesis on three MgH features and compare our results with galactic chemical evolution models. With the current sample, we almost double the number of metal poor stars with Mg isotopes determined from the literature. The new data allow us to determine the metallicity when the $^{26}$Mg abundances start to became important, $[Fe/H] \sim -1.4 \pm 0.1$. The data with $[Fe/H] > -1.4$ are somewhat higher (1-3 $\sigma$) than previous chemical evolution model predictions, indicating perhaps higher yields of the neutron-rich isotopes. Our results using only AGB star enrichment suggest a timescale for formation for the galactic halo of about 0.3 Gyr, but considering also supernova enrichment, the upper limit for the timescale formation is about 1.5 Gyr.
  • Our Galaxy is thought to have undergone an active evolutionary history dominated by star formation, the accretion of cold gas, and, in particular, mergers up to 10 gigayear ago. The stellar halo reveals rich fossil evidence of these interactions in the form of stellar streams, substructures, and chemically distinct stellar components. The impact of dwarf galaxy mergers on the content and morphology of the Galactic disk is still being explored. Recent studies have identified kinematically distinct stellar substructures and moving groups, which may have extragalactic origin. However, there is mounting evidence that stellar overdensities at the outer disk/halo interface could have been caused by the interaction of a dwarf galaxy with the disk. Here we report detailed spectroscopic analysis of 14 stars drawn from two stellar overdensities, each lying about 5 kiloparsecs above and below the Galactic plane - locations suggestive of association with the stellar halo. However, we find that the chemical compositions of these stars are almost identical, both within and between these groups, and closely match the abundance patterns of the Milky Way disk stars. This study hence provides compelling evidence that these stars originate from the disk and the overdensities they are part of were created by tidal interactions of the disk with passing or merging dwarf galaxies.
  • RR Lyrae stars may be the best practical tracers of Galactic halo (sub-)structure and kinematics. The PanSTARRS1 (PS1) $3\pi$ survey offers multi-band, multi-epoch, precise photometry across much of the sky, but a robust identification of RR Lyrae stars in this data set poses a challenge, given PS1's sparse, asynchronous multi-band light curves ($\lesssim 12$ epochs in each of five bands, taken over a 4.5-year period). We present a novel template fitting technique that uses well-defined and physically motivated multi-band light curves of RR Lyrae stars, and demonstrate that we get accurate period estimates, precise to 2~sec in $>80\%$ of cases. We augment these light curve fits with other {\em features} from photometric time-series and provide them to progressively more detailed machine-learned classification models. From these models we are able to select the widest ($3/4$ of the sky) and deepest (reaching 120 kpc) sample of RR Lyrae stars to date. The PS1 sample of $\sim 45,000$ RRab stars is pure (90\%), and complete (80\% at 80 kpc) at high galactic latitudes. It also provides distances precise to 3\%, measured with newly derived period-luminosity relations for optical/near-infrared PS1 bands. With the addition of proper motions from {\em Gaia} and radial velocity measurements from multi-object spectroscopic surveys, we expect the PS1 sample of RR Lyrae stars to become the premier source for studying the structure, kinematics, and the gravitational potential of the Galactic halo. The techniques presented in this study should translate well to other sparse, multi-band data sets, such as those produced by the Dark Energy Survey and the upcoming Large Synoptic Survey Telescope Galactic plane sub-survey.
  • We present Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy of individual stars in the relatively isolated Local Group dwarf galaxies Leo A, Aquarius, and the Sagittarius dwarf irregular galaxy. The three galaxies--but especially Leo A and Aquarius--share in common delayed star formation histories relative to many other isolated dwarf galaxies. The stars in all three galaxies are supported by dispersion. We found no evidence of stellar velocity structure, even for Aquarius, which has rotating HI gas. The velocity dispersions indicate that all three galaxies are dark matter-dominated, with dark-to-baryonic mass ratios ranging from $4.4^{+1.1}_{-0.8}$ (SagDIG) to $9.6^{+2.5}_{-1.8}$ (Aquarius). Leo A and SagDIG have lower stellar metallicities than Aquarius, and they also have higher gas fractions, both of which would be expected if Aquarius were farther along in its chemical evolution. The metallicity distribution of Leo A is inconsistent with a Closed or Leaky Box model of chemical evolution, suggesting that the galaxy was pre-enriched or acquired external gas during star formation. The metallicities of stars increased steadily for all three galaxies, but possibly at different rates. The [$\alpha$/Fe] ratios at a given [Fe/H] are lower than that of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, which indicates more extended star formation histories than Sculptor, consistent with photometrically derived star formation histories. Overall, the bulk kinematic and chemical properties for the late-forming dwarf galaxies do not diverge significantly from those of less delayed dwarf galaxies, including dwarf spheroidal galaxies.
  • Naoyuki Tamura, Naruhisa Takato, Atsushi Shimono, Yuki Moritani, Kiyoto Yabe, Yuki Ishizuka, Akitoshi Ueda, Yukiko Kamata, Hrand Aghazarian, Stephane Arnouts, Gabriel Barban, Robert H. Barkhouser, Renato C. Borges, David F. Braun, Michael A. Carr, Pierre-Yves Chabaud, Yin-Chang Chang, Hsin-Yo Chen, Masashi Chiba, Richard C. Y. Chou, You-Hua Chu, Judith G. Cohen, Rodrigo P. de Almeida, Antonio C. de Oliveira, Ligia S. de Oliveira, Richard G. Dekany, Kjetil Dohlen, Jesulino B. dos Santos, Leandro H. dos Santos, Richard S. Ellis, Maximilian Fabricius, Didier Ferrand, Decio Ferreira, Mirek Golebiowski, Jenny E. Greene, Johannes Gross, James E. Gunn, Randolph Hammond, Albert Harding, Murdock Hart, Timothy M. Heckman, Christopher M. Hirata, Paul Ho, Stephen C. Hope, Larry Hovland, Shu-Fu Hsu, Yen-Shan Hu, Ping-Jie Huang, Marc Jaquet, Yipeng Jing, Jennifer Karr, Masahiko Kimura, Matthew E. King, Eiichiro Komatsu, Vincent Le Brun, Olivier Le Fevre, Arnaud Le Fur, David Le Mignant, Hung-Hsu Ling, Craig P. Loomis, Robert H. Lupton, Fabrice Madec, Peter Mao, Lucas S. Marrara, Claudia Mendes de Oliveira, Yosuke Minowa, Chaz N. Morantz, Hitoshi Murayama, Graham J. Murray, Youichi Ohyama, Joseph Orndorff, Sandrine Pascal, Jefferson M. Pereira, Daniel J. Reiley, Martin Reinecke, Andreas Ritter, Mitsuko Roberts, Mark A. Schwochert, Michael D. Seiffert, Stephen A. Smee, Laerte Sodre Jr., David N. Spergel, Aaron J. Steinkraus, Michael A. Strauss, Christian Surace, Yasushi Suto, Nao Suzuki, John Swinbank, Philip J. Tait, Masahiro Takada, Tomonori Tamura, Yoko Tanaka, Laurence Tresse, Orlando Verducci Jr., Didier Vibert, Clement Vidal, Shiang-Yu Wang, Chih-Yi Wen, Chi-Hung Yan, Naoki Yasuda
    PFS (Prime Focus Spectrograph), a next generation facility instrument on the 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope, is a very wide-field, massively multiplexed, optical and near-infrared spectrograph. Exploiting the Subaru prime focus, 2394 reconfigurable fibers will be distributed over the 1.3 deg field of view. The spectrograph has been designed with 3 arms of blue, red, and near-infrared cameras to simultaneously observe spectra from 380nm to 1260nm in one exposure at a resolution of ~1.6-2.7A. An international collaboration is developing this instrument under the initiative of Kavli IPMU. The project is now going into the construction phase aiming at undertaking system integration in 2017-2018 and subsequently carrying out engineering operations in 2018-2019. This article gives an overview of the instrument, current project status and future paths forward.
  • Methods. We determine the atmospheric parameters and differential abundances using high-resolution ($R \approx 50 000$), high signal-to-noise (S/N $\approx$ 110 - 240 per pixel) Keck HIRES spectra for our solar twin candidate, the previously known solar twin HD 45184, and the Sun. Results. For the bright solar twin HD 45184, we found $T_{\rm{eff}} = 5864 \pm 9$ K, log $g = 4.45 \pm 0.03$ dex, $v_{t} = 1.11 \pm 0.02$ $\rm{km\ {s}}^{-1}$, and [Fe/H]$ = 0.04 \pm 0.01$ dex, which are in good agreement with previous works. The star Inti 1 has atmospheric parameters $T_{\rm{eff}} = 5837 \pm 11$ K, log $g = 4.42 \pm 0.03$ dex, $v_{t} = 1.04 \pm 0.02$ $\rm{km\ {s}}^{-1}$, and [Fe/H]$ = 0.07 \pm 0.01$ dex that are higher than solar. The age and mass of the solar twin HD 45184 (3 Gyr and 1.05 $\rm{M_{\odot}}$) and the faint solar twin Inti 1 (4 Gyr and 1.04 $\rm{M_{\odot}}$) were estimated using isochrones. The differential analysis shows that HD 45184 presents an abundance pattern that is similar to typical nearby solar twins; this means this star has an enhanced refractory relative to volatile elements, while Inti 1 has an abundance pattern closer to solar, albeit somewhat enhanced in refractories. The abundance pattern of HD 45184 and Inti 1 could be reproduced by adding $\approx 3.5\ \rm{M_{\oplus}}$ and $\approx 1.5\ \rm{M_{\oplus}}$ of Earth-like material to the convective zone of the Sun. Conclusions. The star Inti 1 is a faint solar twin, therefore, it could be used to calibrate the zero points of different photometric systems. The distant solar twin Inti 1 has an abundance pattern similar to the Sun with only a minor enhancement in the refractory elements. It would be important to analyze other distant solar twins to verify whether they share the Sun's abundance pattern or if they are enhanced in refractories, as is the case in the majority of nearby solar twins.
  • We present initial results from our study of the outer halo of the Milky Way using a large sample of RR Lyr(ab) variables datamined from the archives of the Palomar Transient Facility. Of the 464 RR Lyr in our sample with distances exceeding 50 kpc, 62 have been observed spectroscopically at the Keck Observatory. Radial velocities and sigma(vr) are given as a function of distance between 50 and 110 kpc, and a very preliminary rather low total mass for the Milky Way out to 110 kpc of ~7 (+-1.5) x 10**11 solar masses is derived from our data.
  • We present the results of a Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) archival search for blue transients which lie in the magnitude range between "normal" core-collapse and superluminous supernovae (i.e. with $-21\,{\leq}M_{R\,(peak)}\,{\leq}-19$). Of the six events found after excluding all interacting Type~IIn and Ia-CSM supernovae, three (PTF09ge, 09axc and 09djl) are coincident with the centers of their hosts, one (10iam) is offset from the center, and for two (10nuj and 11glr) a precise offset can not be determined. All the central events have similar rise times to the He-rich tidal disruption candidate PS1-10jh, and the event with the best-sampled light curve also has similar colors and power-law decay. Spectroscopically, PTF09ge is He-rich, while PTF09axc and 09djl display broad hydrogen features around peak magnitude. All three central events are in low star-formation hosts, two of which are E+A galaxies. Our spectrum of the host of PS1-10jh displays similar properties. PTF10iam, the one offset event, is different photometrically and spectroscopically from the central events and its host displays a higher star formation rate. Finding no obvious evidence for ongoing galactic nuclei activity or recent star formation, we conclude that the three central transients likely arise from the tidal disruption of a star by a super-massive black hole. We compare the spectra of these events to tidal disruption candidates from the literature and find that all of these objects can be unified on a continuous scale of spectral properties. The accumulated evidence of this expanded sample strongly supports a tidal disruption origin for this class of nuclear transients.
  • We report positions, velocities and metallicities of 50 ab-type RR Lyrae (RRab) stars observed in the vicinity of the Orphan stellar stream. Using about 30 RRab stars classified as being likely members of the Orphan stream, we study the metallicity and the spatial extent of the stream. We find that RRab stars in the Orphan stream have a wide range of metallicities, from -1.5 dex to -2.7 dex. The average metallicity of the stream is -2.1 dex, identical to the value obtained by Newberg et al. (2010) using blue horizontal branch stars. We find that the most distant parts of the stream (40-50 kpc from the Sun) are about 0.3 dex more metal-poor than the closer parts (within ~30 kpc), suggesting a possible metallicity gradient along the stream's length. We have extended the previous studies and have mapped the stream up to 55 kpc from the Sun. Even after a careful search, we did not identify any more distant RRab stars that could plausibly be members of the Orphan stream. If confirmed with other tracers, this result would indicate a detection of the end of the leading arm of the stream. We have compared the distances of Orphan stream RRab stars with the best-fit orbits obtained by Newberg et al. (2010). We find that model 6 of Newberg et al. (2010) cannot explain the distances of the most remote Orphan stream RRab stars, and conclude that the best fit to distances of Orphan stream RRab stars and to the local circular velocity is provided by potentials where the total mass of the Galaxy within 60 kpc is M_{60}~2.7x10^{11} Msun, or about 60% of the mass found by previous studies. More extensive modelling that would consider non-spherical potentials and the possibility of misalignment between the stream and the orbit, is highly encouraged.
  • Spectroscopic iron-to-hydrogen ratios, radial velocities, atmospheric parameters, and new photometric analyses are presented for 41 RR Lyrae stars (and one probable high-amplitude delta Scuti star) located in the field-of-view of the Kepler space telescope. Thirty-seven of the RR Lyrae stars are fundamental-mode pulsators (i.e., RRab stars) of which 16 exhibit the Blazhko effect. Four of the stars are multiperiodic RRc pulsators oscillating primarily in the first-overtone mode. Spectroscopic [Fe/H] values for the 34 stars for which we were able to derive estimates range from -2.54 +/- 0.13 (NR Lyr) to -0.05 +/- 0.13 dex (V784 Cyg), and for the 19 Kepler-field non-Blazhko stars studied by Nemec et al.(2011) the abundances agree will with their photometric [Fe/H] values. Four non-Blazhko RR Lyrae stars that they identified as metal-rich (KIC 6100702, V2470 Cyg, V782 Cyg and V784 Cyg) are confirmed as such, and four additional stars (V839 Cyg, KIC 5520878, KIC 8832417, KIC 3868420) are also shown here to be metal-rich. Five of the non-Blazhko RRab stars are found to be more metal-rich than [Fe/H] -0.9 dex while all of the 16 Blazhko stars are more metal-poor than this value. New period-phi31s-[Fe/H] relationships are derived based on ~970 days of quasi-continuous high-precison Q0-Q11 long- and short-cadence Kepler photometry. With the exception of some Blazhko stars, the spectroscopic and photometric [Fe/H] values are in good agreement. Several stars with unique photometric characteristics are identified, including a Blazhko variable with the smallest known amplitude and frequency modulations (V838 Cyg).
  • We present new Keck/HIRES observations of six red giants in the globular cluster NGC 2419. Although the cluster is among the most distant and most luminous in the Milky Way, it was considered chemically ordinary until very recently. Our previous work showed that the near-infrared Ca II triplet line strength varied more than expected for a chemically homogeneous cluster, and that at least one star had unusual abundances of Mg and K. Here, we confirm that NGC 2419 harbors a population of stars, comprising about one third of its mass, that is depleted in Mg by a factor of 8 and enhanced in K by a factor of 6 with respect to the Mg-normal population. Although the majority, Mg-normal population appears to have a chemical abundance pattern indistinguishable from ordinary, inner halo globular clusters, the Mg-poor population exhibits dispersions of several elements. The abundances of K and Sc are strongly anti-correlated with Mg, and some other elements (Si and Ca among others) are weakly anti-correlated with Mg. These abundance patterns suggest that the different populations of NGC 2419 sample the ejecta of diverse supernovae in addition to AGB ejecta. However, the abundances of Fe-peak elements except Sc show no star-to-star variation. We find no nucleosynthetic source that satisfactorily explains all of the abundance variations in this cluster. Because NGC 2419 appears like no other globular cluster, we reiterate our previous suggestion that it is not a globular cluster at all, but rather the core of an accreted dwarf galaxy.
  • The most metal-poor stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) can show the nucleosynthetic patterns of one or a few supernovae. These supernovae could have zero metallicity, making metal-poor dSph stars the closest surviving links to Population III stars. Metal-poor dSph stars also help to reveal the formation mechanism of the Milky Way halo. We present the detailed abundances from Keck/HIRES spectroscopy for two very metal-poor stars in two Milky Way dSphs. One star, in the Sculptor dSph, has [Fe I/H] = -2.40. The other star, in the Ursa Minor dSph, has [Fe I/H] = -3.16. Both stars fall in the previously discovered low-metallicity, high-[alpha/Fe] plateau. Most abundance ratios of very metal-poor stars in these two dSphs are largely consistent with very metal-poor halo stars. However, the abundances of Na and some r-process elements lie at the lower end of the envelope defined by inner halo stars of similar metallicity. We propose that the metallicity dependence of supernova yields is the cause. The earliest supernovae in low-mass dSphs have less gas to pollute than the earliest supernovae in massive halo progenitors. As a result, dSph stars at -3 < [Fe/H] < -2 sample supernovae with [Fe/H] << -3, whereas halo stars in the same metallicity range sample supernovae with [Fe/H] ~ -3. Consequently, enhancements in [Na/Fe] and [r/Fe] were deferred to higher metallicity in dSphs than in the progenitors of the inner halo.
  • We study HIP 56948, the best solar twin known to date, to determine with an unparalleled precision how similar is to the Sun in its physical properties, chemical composition and planet architecture. We explore whether the abundances anomalies may be due to pollution from stellar ejecta or to terrestrial planet formation. We perform a differential abundance analysis (both in LTE and NLTE) using high resolution (R = 100,000) high S/N (600) Keck HIRES spectra of the Sun and HIP 56948. We use precise radial velocity data from the McDonald and Keck observatories to search for planets around this star. We achieve a precision of sigma = 0.003 dex for several elements. Including errors in stellar parameters the total uncertainty is as low as sigma = 0.005 dex (1 %), which is unprecedented in elemental abundance studies. The similarities between HIP 56948 and the Sun are astonishing. HIP 56948 is only 17+/-7 K hotter than the Sun, and log g, [Fe/H] and microturbulence are only +0.02+/-0.02 dex, +0.02+/-0.01 dex and +0.01+/-0.01 km/s higher than solar, respectively. HIP 56948 has a mass of 1.02+/-0.02M_Sun and is 1 Gyr younger than the Sun. Both stars show a chemical abundance pattern that differs from most solar twins. The trend with T_cond in differential abundances (twins - HIP56948) can be reproduced very well by adding 3 M_Earth of a mix of Earth and meteoritic material, to the convection zone of HIP 56948. From our radial velocity monitoring we find no indications of giant planets interior to or within the habitable zone of HIP 56948. We conclude that HIP 56948 is an excellent candidate to host a planetary system like our own, including the possible presence of inner terrestrial planets. Its striking similarity to the Sun and its mature age makes HIP 56948 a prime target in the quest for other Earths and SETI endeavors.
  • We have now completed detailed abundance analyses of more than 100 stars selected as candidate extremely metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] < -3.0 dex. Of these 18 are below -3.3 dex on the scale of the First Stars VLT project led by Cayrel, and 57 are below -3.0 dex on that scale. Ignoring enhancement of carbon which ranges up to very large values, and two C-rich stars with very high N as well, there are 0 to 3 high or low strong outliers for each abundance ratio tested from Mg to Ni. The outliers have been checked and they are real. Ignoring the outliers, the dispersions are in most cases approximately consistent with the uncertainties, except those for [Sr/Fe] and [Ba/Fe], which are much larger. Approximately 6% of the sample are strong outliers in one or more elements between Mg and Ni. This rises to ~15% if minor outliers for these elements and strong outliers for Sr and Ba are included. There are 6 stars with extremely low [Sr/Fe and [Ba/Fe], including one which has lower [Ba/H] than Draco 119, the star found by Fulbright, Rich and Castro to have the lowest such ratio known previously. There is one extreme r-process star.
  • Although there have been recent claims that there is a large dispersion in the abundances of the heavy neutron capture elements in the old Galactic globular cluster M92, we show that the measured dispersion for the absolute abundances of four of the rare earth elements within a sample of 12 luminous red giants in M92 (less than or equal to 0.07 dex) does not exceed the relevant sources of uncertainty. As expected from previous studies, the heavy elements show the signature of the r-process. Their abundance ratios are essentially identical to those of M30, another nearby globular cluster of similar metallicity.
  • On May 31, 2011 UT a supernova (SN) exploded in the nearby galaxy M51 (the Whirlpool Galaxy). We discovered this event using small telescopes equipped with CCD cameras, as well as by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) survey, and rapidly confirmed it to be a Type II supernova. Our early light curve and spectroscopy indicates that PTF11eon resulted from the explosion of a relatively compact progenitor star as evidenced by the rapid shock-breakout cooling seen in the light curve, the relatively low temperature in early-time spectra and the prompt appearance of low-ionization spectral features. The spectra of PTF11eon are dominated by H lines out to day 10 after explosion, but initial signs of He appear to be present. Assuming that He lines continue to develop in the near future, this SN is likely a member of the cIIb (compact IIb; Chevalier and Soderberg 2010) class, with progenitor radius larger than that of SN 2008ax and smaller than the eIIb (extended IIb) SN 1993J progenitor. Our data imply that the object identified in pre-explosion Hubble Space Telescope images at the SN location is possibly a companion to the progenitor or a blended source, and not the progenitor star itself, as its radius (~10^13 cm) would be highly inconsistent with constraints from our post-explosion photometric and spectroscopic data.
  • We present an update on the status of the 0Z Survey, an effort to datamine the Hamburg/ESO Survey to find and study in detail a large sample of extremely metal-poor Galactic halo field stars with [Fe/H] < -3 dex. After searching 1,565 moderate resolution spectra of candidates selected from the HES, we have acquired high resolution spectra of 103 of the most metal-poor of them. Detailed abundance analyses have been performed for all these stars. This has resulted in the discovery of 18 new stars below [Fe/H] -3.5 dex and 57 below -3.0 dex. Some results are presented regarding our search for outliers in chemical abundances of particular species among the sample of 103 stars. Ignoring C and N, about 15% of the sample are "abnormal" in some way. Our plans to complete this project and write the final set of papers are described.
  • We present a catalog of Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances for 2961 red giant stars that are likely members of eight dwarf satellite galaxies of the Milky Way (MW): Sculptor, Fornax, Leo I, Sextans, Leo II, Canes Venatici I, Ursa Minor, and Draco. For the purposes of validating our measurements, we also observed 445 red giants in MW globular clusters and 21 field red giants in the MW halo. The measurements are based on Keck/DEIMOS medium-resolution spectroscopy combined with spectral synthesis. We estimate uncertainties in [Fe/H] by quantifying the dispersion of [Fe/H] measurements in a sample of stars in monometallic globular clusters. We estimate uncertainties in Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances by comparing our medium-resolution spectroscopic measurements to high-resolution spectroscopic abundances of the same stars. For this purpose, our DEIMOS sample included 132 red giants with published high-resolution spectroscopy in globular clusters, the MW halo field, and dwarf galaxies. The standard deviations of the differences in [Fe/H] and [alpha/Fe] (the average of [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe]) between the two samples is 0.15 and 0.16, respectively. This catalog represents the largest sample of multi-element abundances in dwarf galaxies to date. The next papers in this series draw conclusions on the chemical evolution, gas dynamics, and star formation histories from the catalog presented here. The wide range of dwarf galaxy luminosity reveals the dependence of dwarf galaxy chemical evolution on galaxy stellar mass.
  • We isolate a sample of 43 upper RGB stars in the extreme outer halo Galactic globular cluster NGC 2419 from two Keck/DEIMOS slitmasks. The probability that there is more than one contaminating halo field star in this sample is extremely low. Analysis of moderate resolution spectra of these cluster members, as well as of our Keck/HIRES high resolution spectra of a subsample of them, demonstrates that there is a small but real spread in Ca abundance of ~ 0.2 dex within this massive metal-poor globular cluster. This provides additional support to earlier suggestions that NGC 2419 is the remnant of a dwarf galaxy accreted long ago by the Milky Way.
  • We present an abundance analysis based on high resolution spectra of 10 stars selected to span the full range in metallicity in the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We find [Fe/H] for the sample stars ranges from -1.35 to -3.10 dex and establish the trends of the abundance ratios [X/Fe]. In key cases, particularly for the alpha-elements, these resemble those for stars in the outer part of the Galactic halo, especially at the lowest metallicities probed. The n-capture elements show a r-process distribution over the full range of Fe-metallicity. This suggests that the duration of star formation in the UMi dSph was shorter than in other dSph galaxies. The derived ages for a larger sample of UMi stars with more uncertain metallicities also suggest a population dominated by uniformly old (~13 Gyr) stars, with a hint of an age-metallicity relationship. In comparing our results for UMi, our earlier work in Draco, and published studies of more metal-rich dSph Galactic satellites, there appears to be a pattern of moving from a chemical inventory for dSph giants with [Fe/H] < -2 dex which is very similar to that of stars in the outer part of the Galactic halo (enhanced alpha/Fe relative to the Sun, coupled with subsolar [X/Fe] for the heavy neutron capture elements and r-process domination), switching to subsolar alpha-elements and super-solar s-process dominated neutron capture elements for the highest [Fe/H] dSph stars. The combination of low star formation rates over a varying and sometimes extended duration that produced the stellar populations in the local dSph galaxies with [Fe/H] > -1.5 dex leads to a chemical inventory wildly discrepant from that of any component of the Milky Way.
  • We present a new solution for the dispersive element in astronomical spectrographs, which in many cases can provide an upgrade path to enhance the spectral resolution of existing moderate-resolution reflection-grating spectrographs. We demonstrate that in the case of LRIS-R at the Keck 1 Telescope a spectral resolution of 18,000 can be achieved with reasonable throughput under good seeing conditions.
  • We study a sample of 16 microlensed Galactic bulge main sequence turnoff region stars for which high dispersion spectra have been obtained with detailed abundance analyses. We demonstrate that there is a very strong and highly statistically significant correlation between the maximum magnification of the microlensed bulge star and the value of the [Fe/H] deduced from the high resolution spectrum of each object. Physics demands that this correlation, assuming it to be real, be the result of some sample bias. We suggest several possible explanations, but are forced to reject them all,and are left puzzled. To obtain a reliable metallicity distribution in the Galactic bulge based on microlensed dwarf stars it will be necessary to resolve this issue through the course of additional observations.
  • We review the properties of globular clusters which make them useful for studying the Galactic halo, Galactic chemical evolution, and the early stages of the formation of the Milky Way. We review the evidence that GCs have a chemical inventory similar to those of halo field stars. We discuss the abundance ratios for dSph galaxies and show that it is possible to have formed at least part the Galactic halo field stellar population by dissolving globular clusters and/or accreting dSph galaxies but only if this occurred at an early stage in the formation of the Galaxy. We review the constraints on halo formation timescales deduced from the low Mg isotopic ratios in metal-poor halo field dwarfs which indicate that AGB stars did not have time to contribute significantly, while M71 contains two populations, one without and also one with a substantial AGB contribution. We review the limited evidence for GCs with a second population showing additional contributions from SNII, currently confined to Omega Cen, M54, and M22, all of which may have been the nuclei or central regions of accreted galaxies. We check our own data for additional such GCs, and find preliminary indications that NGC 2419, a massive GC far in the outer Galactic halo, may also belong to this group.
  • We present an abundance analysis based on high resolution spectra of 8 stars selected to span the full range in metallicity in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We find [Fe/H] for the sample stars ranges from -1.5 to -3.0 dex. Combining our sample with previously published work for a total of 14 luminous Draco giants, we show that the abundance ratios [Na/Fe], [Mg/Fe] and [Si/Fe] for the Draco giants overlap those of Galactic halo giants at the lowest [Fe/H] probed, but are significantly lower for the higher Fe-metallicity Draco stars. For the explosive alpha-elements Ca and Ti, the abundance ratios for Draco giants with [Fe/H] > -2.4 dex are approximately constant and slightly sub-solar, well below values characteristic of Galactic halo stars. The s-process contribution to the production of heavy elements begins at significantly lower Fe-metallicity than in the Galactic halo. Using a toy model we compare the behavior of the abundance ratios within the sample of Draco giants with those from the literature of Galactic globular clusters, and the Carina and Sgr dSph galaxies. The differences appear to be related to the timescale for buildup of the heavy elements, with Draco having the slowest rate. We note the presence of a Draco giant with [Fe/H] < -3.0 dex in our sample, and reaffirm that the inner Galactic halo could have been formed by early accretion of Galactic satellite galaxies and dissolution of young globular clusters, while the outer halo could have formed from those satellite galaxies accreted later.