• The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or at most -- a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ration of 10 dB and operation at room temperature with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of a CMOS compatible, integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the single-atom level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform -- a platform where optics, electronics and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.
  • We show that undoped silicon waveguides may suffer of up to 1.8 dB/cm free-carrier absorption caused by improper surface passivation. To verify the effects of free-carriers we apply a gate field to the waveguides. Smallest losses correspond to higher electrical sheet resistances and are generally obtained with non-zero gate fields. The presence of free carriers for zero gate field is attributed to surface transfer doping. These results open new perspectives for minimizing propagation losses in silicon waveguides and for obtaining low-loss and highly conductive silicon films without applying a gate voltage.
  • Structuring optical materials on a nanometer scale can lead to artificial effective media, or metamaterials, with strongly altered optical behavior. Metamaterials can provide a wide range of linear optical properties such as negative refractive index, hyperbolic dispersion, or magnetic behavior at optical frequencies. Nonlinear optical properties, however, have only been demonstrated for patterned metallic films which suffer from high optical losses. Here we show that second-order nonlinear metamaterials can also be obtained from non-metallic centrosymmetric constituents with inherently low optical absorption. In our proof-of-principle experiments, we have iterated atomic-layer deposition (ALD) of three different constituents, A = Al$_2$O$_3$, B = TiO$_2$ and C = HfO$_2$. The centrosymmetry of the resulting ABC stack is broken since the ABC and the inverted CBA sequences are not equivalent - a necessary condition for non-zero second-order nonlinearity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first realization of a bulk nonlinear optical metamaterial.
  • Optical frequency combs enable coherent data transmission on hundreds of wavelength channels and have the potential to revolutionize terabit communications. Generation of Kerr combs in nonlinear integrated microcavities represents a particularly promising option enabling line spacings of tens of GHz, compliant with wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) grids. However, Kerr combs may exhibit strong phase noise and multiplet spectral lines, and this has made high-speed data transmission impossible up to now. Recent work has shown that systematic adjustment of pump conditions enables low phase-noise Kerr combs with singlet spectral lines. Here we demonstrate that Kerr combs are suited for coherent data transmission with advanced modulation formats that pose stringent requirements on the spectral purity of the optical source. In a first experiment, we encode a data stream of 392 Gbit/s on subsequent lines of a Kerr comb using quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) and 16-state quadrature amplitude modulation (16QAM). A second experiment shows feedback-stabilization of a Kerr comb and transmission of a 1.44 Tbit/s data stream over a distance of up to 300 km. The results demonstrate that Kerr combs can meet the highly demanding requirements of multi-terabit/s coherent communications and thus offer a solution towards chip-scale terabit/s transceivers.
  • Photonic integration has witnessed tremendous progress over the last years, and chip-scale transceiver systems with Terabit/s data rates have come into reach. However, as on-chip integration density increases, efficient off-chip interfaces are becoming more and more crucial. A technological breakthrough is considered indispensable to cope with the challenges arising from large-scale photonic integration, and this particularly applies to short-distance optical interconnects. In this letter we introduce the concept of photonic wire bonding, where transparent waveguide wire bonds are used to bridge the gap between nanophotonic circuits located on different chips. We demonstrate for the first time the fabrication of three-dimensional freeform photonic wire bonds (PWB), and we confirm their viability in a multi-Terabit/s data transmission experiment. First-generation prototypes allow for efficient broadband coupling with overall losses of only 1.6 dB. Photonic wire bonding will enable flexible optical multi-chip assemblies, thereby challenging the current paradigm of highly-complex monolithic integration.