• Managing blood lipid levels is important for the treatment and prevention of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. An easy-to-use, portable lipid blood test will accelerate more frequent testing by patients and at-risk populations. We used smartphone systems that are already familiar to many people. Because smartphone systems can be carried around everywhere, blood can be measured easily and frequently. We compared the results of lipid tests with those of existing clinical diagnostic laboratory methods. We found that smartphone-based point-of-care lipid blood tests are as accurate as hospital-grade laboratory tests. Our system will be useful for those who need to manage blood lipid levels to motivate them to track and control their behavior.
  • We investigate the Gorkov--Melik-Barkhudarov (GM) correction to superfluid transition temperature in two-dimensional Fermi gases with Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) across the SOC-driven BCS-BEC crossover. In the calculation of the induced interaction, we find that the spin-component mixing due to SOC can induce both of the conventional screening and additional antiscreening contributions that interplay significantly in the strong SOC regime. While the GM correction generally lowers the estimate of transition temperature, it turns out that at a fixed weak interaction, the correction effect exhibits a crossover behavior where the ratio between the estimates without and with the correction first decreases with SOC and then becomes insensitive to SOC when it goes into the strong SOC regime. We demonstrate the applicability of the GM correction by comparing the zero-temperature condensate fraction with the recent quantum Monte Carlo results.
  • In an article in 2013, Caldas et al. [Phys. Rev. A 88, 023615 (2013)] derived analytical expressions of the induced interaction within the scheme of Gorkov and Melik-Barkhudrov in quasi-two-dimensional Fermi gases with Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC). They claimed that the induced interaction is exactly the same as the one for the case without SOC when the SOC is weak, and in the region of strong SOC, it starts from a reduced value and then recovers the value for the zero SOC in the limit of large SOC. We point out that their calculations contain the critical errors and inconsistencies that significantly affect the basis of these claims.
  • We develop a feature allocation model for inference on genetic tumor variation using next-generation sequencing data. Specifically, we record single nucleotide variants (SNVs) based on short reads mapped to human reference genome and characterize tumor heterogeneity by latent haplotypes defined as a scaffold of SNVs on the same homologous genome. For multiple samples from a single tumor, assuming that each sample is composed of some sample-specific proportions of these haplotypes, we then fit the observed variant allele fractions of SNVs for each sample and estimate the proportions of haplotypes. Varying proportions of haplotypes across samples is evidence of tumor heterogeneity since it implies varying composition of cell subpopulations. Taking a Bayesian perspective, we proceed with a prior probability model for all relevant unknown quantities, including, in particular, a prior probability model on the binary indicators that characterize the latent haplotypes. Such prior models are known as feature allocation models. Specifically, we define a simplified version of the Indian buffet process, one of the most traditional feature allocation models. The proposed model allows overlapping clustering of SNVs in defining latent haplotypes, which reflects the evolutionary process of subclonal expansion in tumor samples.
  • We investigate the tricritical scaling behavior of the two-dimensional spin-$1$ Blume-Capel model using the Wang-Landau method measuring the joint density of states for lattice sizes up to $48\times 48$ sites. The first-order transition curve is systematically determined employing the method of field mixing in conjunction with finite-size scaling, showing a significant deviation from the previous data points. Deep in the first-order area of the phase diagram, we also find that the specific heat exhibits a double-peak structure of the Schottky-like anomaly appearing with the transition peak. At the tricritical point, we characterize the tricritical exponents through finite-size scaling analysis including the phenomenological finite-size scaling with thermodynamic variables. Our estimation of the tricritical eigenvalue exponents, $y_t = 1.804(5)$, $y_g = 0.80(1)$, and $y_h = 1.925(3)$, provides the first Wang-Landau verification of the conjectured exact values, demonstrating the effectiveness of the density-of-states-based approach in finite-size scaling study of multicritical phenomena.
  • Tumor samples are heterogeneous. They consist of different subclones that are characterized by differences in DNA nucleotide sequences and copy numbers on multiple loci. Heterogeneity can be measured through the identification of the subclonal copy number and sequence at a selected set of loci. Understanding that the accurate identification of variant allele fractions greatly depends on a precise determination of copy numbers, we develop a Bayesian feature allocation model for jointly calling subclonal copy numbers and the corresponding allele sequences for the same loci. The proposed method utilizes three random matrices, L, Z and w to represent subclonal copy numbers (L), numbers of subclonal variant alleles (Z) and cellular fractions of subclones in samples (w), respectively. The unknown number of subclones implies a random number of columns for these matrices. We use next-generation sequencing data to estimate the subclonal structures through inference on these three matrices. Using simulation studies and a real data analysis, we demonstrate how posterior inference on the subclonal structure is enhanced with the joint modeling of both structure and sequencing variants on subclonal genomes. Software is available at http://compgenome.org/BayClone2.