• The degree splitting problem requires coloring the edges of a graph red or blue such that each node has almost the same number of edges in each color, up to a small additive discrepancy. The directed variant of the problem requires orienting the edges such that each node has almost the same number of incoming and outgoing edges, again up to a small additive discrepancy. We present deterministic distributed algorithms for both variants, which improve on their counterparts presented by Ghaffari and Su [SODA'17]: our algorithms are significantly simpler and faster, and have a much smaller discrepancy. This also leads to a faster and simpler deterministic algorithm for $(2+o(1))\Delta$-edge-coloring, improving on that of Ghaffari and Su.
  • A number of recent papers -- e.g. Brandt et al. (STOC 2016), Chang et al. (FOCS 2016), Ghaffari & Su (SODA 2017), Brandt et al. (PODC 2017), and Chang & Pettie (FOCS 2017) -- have advanced our understanding of one of the most fundamental questions in theory of distributed computing: what are the possible time complexity classes of LCL problems in the LOCAL model? In essence, we have a graph problem $\Pi$ in which a solution can be verified by checking all radius-$O(1)$ neighbourhoods, and the question is what is the smallest $T$ such that a solution can be computed so that each node chooses its own output based on its radius-$T$ neighbourhood. Here $T$ is the distributed time complexity of $\Pi$. The time complexity classes for deterministic algorithms in bounded-degree graphs that are known to exist by prior work are $\Theta(1)$, $\Theta(\log^* n)$, $\Theta(\log n)$, $\Theta(n^{1/k})$, and $\Theta(n)$. It is also known that there are two gaps: one between $\omega(1)$ and $o(\log \log^* n)$, and another between $\omega(\log^* n)$ and $o(\log n)$. It has been conjectured that many more gaps exist, and that the overall time hierarchy is relatively simple -- indeed, this is known to be the case in restricted graph families such as cycles and grids. We show that the picture is much more diverse than previously expected. We present a general technique for engineering LCL problems with numerous different deterministic time complexities, including $\Theta(\log^{\alpha}n)$ for any $\alpha\ge1$, $2^{\Theta(\log^{\alpha}n)}$ for any $\alpha\le 1$, and $\Theta(n^{\alpha})$ for any $\alpha <1/2$ in the high end of the complexity spectrum, and $\Theta(\log^{\alpha}\log^* n)$ for any $\alpha\ge 1$, $\smash{2^{\Theta(\log^{\alpha}\log^* n)}}$ for any $\alpha\le 1$, and $\Theta((\log^* n)^{\alpha})$ for any $\alpha \le 1$ in the low end; here $\alpha$ is a positive rational number.
  • In this work we study the cost of local and global proofs on distributed verification. In this setting the nodes of a distributed system are provided with a nondeterministic proof for the correctness of the state of the system, and the nodes need to verify this proof by looking at only their local neighborhood in the system. Previous works have studied the model where each node is given its own, possibly unique, part of the proof as input. The cost of a proof is the maximum size of an individual label. We compare this model to a model where each node has access to the same global proof, and the cost is the size of this global proof. It is easy to see that a global proof can always include all of the local proofs, and every local proof can be a copy of the global proof. We show that there exists properties that exhibit these relative proof sizes, and also properties that are somewhere in between. In addition, we introduce a new lower bound technique and use it to prove a tight lower bound on the complexity of reversing distributed decision and establish a link between communication complexity and distributed proof complexity.
  • Distributed proofs are mechanisms enabling the nodes of a network to collectivity and efficiently check the correctness of Boolean predicates on the structure of the network, or on data-structures distributed over the nodes (e.g., spanning trees or routing tables). We consider mechanisms consisting of two components: a \emph{prover} assigning a \emph{certificate} to each node, and a distributed algorithm called \emph{verifier} that is in charge of verifying the distributed proof formed by the collection of all certificates. In this paper, we show that many network predicates have distributed proofs offering a high level of redundancy, explicitly or implicitly. We use this remarkable property of distributed proofs for establishing perfect tradeoffs between the \emph{size of the certificate} stored at every node, and the \emph{number of rounds} of the verification protocol. If we allow every node to communicate to distance at most $t$, one might expect that the certificate sizes can be reduced by a multiplicative factor of at least~$t$. In trees, cycles and grids, we show that such tradeoffs can be established for \emph{all} network predicates, i.e., it is always possible to linearly decrease the certificate size. In arbitrary graphs, we show that any part of the certificates common to all nodes can be evenly redistributed among these nodes, achieving even a better tradeoff: this common part of the certificate can be reduced by the size of a smallest ball of radius $t$ in the network. In addition to these general results, we establish several upper and lower bounds on the certificate sizes used for distributed proofs for spanning trees, minimum-weight spanning trees, diameter, additive and multiplicative spanners, and more, improving and generalizing previous results from the literature.
  • We present a randomized distributed algorithm that computes a $\Delta$-coloring in any non-complete graph with maximum degree $\Delta \geq 4$ in $O(\log \Delta) + 2^{O(\sqrt{\log\log n})}$ rounds, as well as a randomized algorithm that computes a $\Delta$-coloring in $O((\log \log n)^2)$ rounds when $\Delta \in [3, O(1)]$. Both these algorithms improve on an $O(\log^3 n/\log \Delta)$-round algorithm of Panconesi and Srinivasan~[STOC'1993], which has remained the state of the art for the past 25 years. Moreover, the latter algorithm gets (exponentially) closer to an $\Omega(\log\log n)$ round lower bound of Brandt et al.~[STOC'16].
  • LCLs or locally checkable labelling problems (e.g. maximal independent set, maximal matching, and vertex colouring) in the LOCAL model of computation are very well-understood in cycles (toroidal 1-dimensional grids): every problem has a complexity of $O(1)$, $\Theta(\log^* n)$, or $\Theta(n)$, and the design of optimal algorithms can be fully automated. This work develops the complexity theory of LCL problems for toroidal 2-dimensional grids. The complexity classes are the same as in the 1-dimensional case: $O(1)$, $\Theta(\log^* n)$, and $\Theta(n)$. However, given an LCL problem it is undecidable whether its complexity is $\Theta(\log^* n)$ or $\Theta(n)$ in 2-dimensional grids. Nevertheless, if we correctly guess that the complexity of a problem is $\Theta(\log^* n)$, we can completely automate the design of optimal algorithms. For any problem we can find an algorithm that is of a normal form $A' \circ S_k$, where $A'$ is a finite function, $S_k$ is an algorithm for finding a maximal independent set in $k$th power of the grid, and $k$ is a constant. Finally, partially with the help of automated design tools, we classify the complexity of several concrete LCL problems related to colourings and orientations.
  • We extend the notion of distributed decision in the framework of distributed network computing, inspired by recent results on so-called distributed graph automata. We show that, by using distributed decision mechanisms based on the interaction between a prover and a disprover, the size of the certificates distributed to the nodes for certifying a given network property can be drastically reduced. For instance, we prove that minimum spanning tree can be certified with $O(\log n)$-bit certificates in $n$-node graphs, with just one interaction between the prover and the disprover, while it is known that certifying MST requires $\Omega(\log^2 n)$-bit certificates if only the prover can act. The improvement can even be exponential for some simple graph properties. For instance, it is known that certifying the existence of a nontrivial automorphism requires $\Omega(n^2)$ bits if only the prover can act. We show that there is a protocol with two interactions between the prover and the disprover enabling to certify nontrivial automorphism with $O(\log n)$-bit certificates. These results are achieved by defining and analysing a local hierarchy of decision which generalizes the classical notions of proof-labelling schemes and locally checkable proofs.
  • This work bridges the gap between distributed and centralised models of computing in the context of sublinear-time graph algorithms. A priori, typical centralised models of computing (e.g., parallel decision trees or centralised local algorithms) seem to be much more powerful than distributed message-passing algorithms: centralised algorithms can directly probe any part of the input, while in distributed algorithms nodes can only communicate with their immediate neighbours. We show that for a large class of graph problems, this extra freedom does not help centralised algorithms at all: for example, efficient stateless deterministic centralised local algorithms can be simulated with efficient distributed message-passing algorithms. In particular, this enables us to transfer existing lower bound results from distributed algorithms to centralised local algorithms.
  • We show that any randomised Monte Carlo distributed algorithm for the Lov\'asz local lemma requires $\Omega(\log \log n)$ communication rounds, assuming that it finds a correct assignment with high probability. Our result holds even in the special case of $d = O(1)$, where $d$ is the maximum degree of the dependency graph. By prior work, there are distributed algorithms for the Lov\'asz local lemma with a running time of $O(\log n)$ rounds in bounded-degree graphs, and the best lower bound before our work was $\Omega(\log^* n)$ rounds [Chung et al. 2014].
  • The role of unique node identifiers in network computing is well understood as far as symmetry breaking is concerned. However, the unique identifiers also leak information about the computing environment - in particular, they provide some nodes with information related to the size of the network. It was recently proved that in the context of local decision, there are some decision problems such that (1) they cannot be solved without unique identifiers, and (2) unique node identifiers leak a sufficient amount of information such that the problem becomes solvable (PODC 2013). In this work we give study what is the minimal amount of information that we need to leak from the environment to the nodes in order to solve local decision problems. Our key results are related to scalar oracles $f$ that, for any given $n$, provide a multiset $f(n)$ of $n$ labels; then the adversary assigns the labels to the $n$ nodes in the network. This is a direct generalisation of the usual assumption of unique node identifiers. We give a complete characterisation of the weakest oracle that leaks at least as much information as the unique identifiers. Our main result is the following dichotomy: we classify scalar oracles as large and small, depending on their asymptotic behaviour, and show that (1) any large oracle is at least as powerful as the unique identifiers in the context of local decision problems, while (2) for any small oracle there are local decision problems that still benefit from unique identifiers.
  • This work studies distributed algorithms for locally optimal load-balancing: We are given a graph of maximum degree $\Delta$, and each node has up to $L$ units of load. The task is to distribute the load more evenly so that the loads of adjacent nodes differ by at most $1$. If the graph is a path ($\Delta = 2$), it is easy to solve the fractional version of the problem in $O(L)$ communication rounds, independently of the number of nodes. We show that this is tight, and we show that it is possible to solve also the discrete version of the problem in $O(L)$ rounds in paths. For the general case ($\Delta > 2$), we show that fractional load balancing can be solved in $\operatorname{poly}(L,\Delta)$ rounds and discrete load balancing in $f(L,\Delta)$ rounds for some function $f$, independently of the number of nodes.
  • We study the problem of finding large cuts in $d$-regular triangle-free graphs. In prior work, Shearer (1992) gives a randomised algorithm that finds a cut of expected size $(1/2 + 0.177/\sqrt{d})m$, where $m$ is the number of edges. We give a simpler algorithm that does much better: it finds a cut of expected size $(1/2 + 0.28125/\sqrt{d})m$. As a corollary, this shows that in any $d$-regular triangle-free graph there exists a cut of at least this size. Our algorithm can be interpreted as a very efficient randomised distributed algorithm: each node needs to produce only one random bit, and the algorithm runs in one synchronous communication round. This work is also a case study of applying computational techniques in the design of distributed algorithms: our algorithm was designed by a computer program that searched for optimal algorithms for small values of $d$.
  • By prior work, there is a distributed algorithm that finds a maximal fractional matching (maximal edge packing) in $O(\Delta)$ rounds, where $\Delta$ is the maximum degree of the graph. We show that this is optimal: there is no distributed algorithm that finds a maximal fractional matching in $o(\Delta)$ rounds. Our work gives the first linear-in-$\Delta$ lower bound for a natural graph problem in the standard model of distributed computing---prior lower bounds for a wide range of graph problems have been at best logarithmic in $\Delta$.
  • In the study of deterministic distributed algorithms it is commonly assumed that each node has a unique $O(\log n)$-bit identifier. We prove that for a general class of graph problems, local algorithms (constant-time distributed algorithms) do not need such identifiers: a port numbering and orientation is sufficient. Our result holds for so-called simple PO-checkable graph optimisation problems; this includes many classical packing and covering problems such as vertex covers, edge covers, matchings, independent sets, dominating sets, and edge dominating sets. We focus on the case of bounded-degree graphs and show that if a local algorithm finds a constant-factor approximation of a simple PO-checkable graph problem with the help of unique identifiers, then the same approximation ratio can be achieved on anonymous networks. As a corollary of our result and by prior work, we derive a tight lower bound on the local approximability of the minimum edge dominating set problem. Our main technical tool is an algebraic construction of homogeneously ordered graphs: We say that a graph is $(\alpha,r)$-homogeneous if its nodes are linearly ordered so that an $\alpha$ fraction of nodes have pairwise isomorphic radius-$r$ neighbourhoods. We show that there exists a finite $(\alpha,r)$-homogeneous $2k$-regular graph of girth at least $g$ for any $\alpha < 1$ and any $r$, $k$, and $g$.
  • We study distributed algorithms that find a maximal matching in an anonymous, edge-coloured graph. If the edges are properly coloured with $k$ colours, there is a trivial greedy algorithm that finds a maximal matching in $k-1$ synchronous communication rounds. The present work shows that the greedy algorithm is optimal in the general case: any algorithm that finds a maximal matching in anonymous, $k$-edge-coloured graphs requires $k-1$ rounds. If we focus on graphs of maximum degree $\Delta$, it is known that a maximal matching can be found in $O(\Delta + \log^* k)$ rounds, and prior work implies a lower bound of $\Omega(\polylog(\Delta) + \log^* k)$ rounds. Our work closes the gap between upper and lower bounds: the complexity is $\Theta(\Delta + \log^* k)$ rounds. To our knowledge, this is the first linear-in-$\Delta$ lower bound for the distributed complexity of a classical graph problem.