• Time-reversal symmetry suppresses electron backscattering in a quantum-spin-Hall edge, yielding quantized conductance at zero temperature. Understanding the dominant corrections in finite-temperature experiments remains an unsettled issue. We study a novel mechanism for conductance suppression: backscattering caused by incoherent electromagnetic noise. Specifically, we show that an electric potential fluctuating randomly in time can backscatter electrons inelastically without constraints faced by electron-electron interactions. We quantify noise-induced corrections to the dc conductance in various regimes and propose an experiment to test this scenario.
  • We calculate the two-terminal current noise generated by a magnetic moment coupled to a helical edge of a two-dimensional topological insulator. When the system is symmetric with respect to in-plane spin rotation, the noise is dominated by the Nyquist component even in the presence of a voltage bias $V$. The corresponding noise spectrum $S(V,\omega)$ is determined by a modified fluctuation-dissipation theorem with the differential conductance $G(V,\omega)$ in place of the linear one. The differential noise $\partial S/ \partial V$, commonly measured in experiments, is strongly dependent on frequency on a small scale $\tau_{K}^{-1}\ll T$ set by the Korringa relaxation rate of the local moment. This is in stark contrast with the case of conventional mesoscopic conductors where $\partial S/ \partial V$ is frequency-independent and defined by the shot noise. In a helical edge, a violation of the spin-rotation symmetry leads to the shot noise, which becomes important only at a high bias. Uncharacteristically for a fermion system, this noise in the backscattered current is super-Poissonian.
  • We study the effect of localized magnetic moments on the conductance of a helical edge. Interaction with a local moment is an effective backscattering mechanism for the edge electrons. We evaluate the resulting differential conductance as a function of temperature $T$ and applied bias $V$ for any value of $V/T$. Backscattering off magnetic moments, combined with the weak repulsion between the edge electrons results in a power-law temperature and voltage dependence of the conductance; the corresponding small positive exponent is indicative of insulating behavior. Local moments may naturally appear due to charge disorder in a narrow-gap semiconductor. Our results provide an alternative interpretation of the recent experiment by Li et al. \cite{Li15} where a power-law suppression of the conductance was attributed to strong electron repulsion within the edge, with the value of Luttinger liquid parameter $K$ fine-tuned close to $1/4$.
  • The superconducting proximity effect in semiconductor nanowires has recently enabled the study of novel superconducting architectures, such as gate-tunable superconducting qubits and multiterminal Josephson junctions. As opposed to their metallic counterparts, the electron density in semiconductor nanosystems is tunable by external electrostatic gates providing a highly scalable and in-situ variation of the device properties. In addition, semiconductors with large g-factor and spin-orbit coupling have been shown to give rise to exotic phenomena in superconductivity, such as $\varphi_0$ Josephson junctions and the emergence of Majorana bound states. Here, we report microwave spectroscopy measurements that directly reveal the presence of Andreev bound states (ABS) in ballistic semiconductor channels. We show that the measured ABS spectra is a result of transport channels with gate-tunable, high transmission probabilities up to 0.9, which is required for gate-tunable Andreev qubits and beneficial for braiding schemes of Majorana states. For the first time, we detect excitations of a spin-split pair of ABS and observe symmetry-broken ABS, a direct consequence of the spin-orbit coupling in the semiconductor.
  • We find the admittance of a topological Josephson junction $Y(\omega,\varphi_0, T)$ as a function of frequency $\omega$, the static phase bias $\varphi_0$ applied to the superconducting leads, and temperature $T$. The dissipative part of $Y$ allows for spectroscopy of the sub-gap states in the junction. The resonant frequencies $\omega_{\mathcal{M}, n} (\varphi_0)$ for transitions involving the Majorana ($\mathcal{M}$) doublet exhibit characteristic kinks in the $\varphi_0$-dependence at $\varphi_0=\pi$. The kinks -- associated with decoupled Majorana states -- remain sharp and the corresponding spectroscopic lines are bright at any temperature, as long as the leads are superconducting. The developed theory may help extracting quantitative information about Majorana states from microwave spectroscopy.
  • Time-reversal symmetry prohibits elastic backscattering of electrons propagating within a helical edge of a two-dimensional topological insulator. However, small band gaps in these systems make them sensitive to doping disorder, which may lead to the formation of electron and hole puddles. Such a puddle -- a quantum dot -- tunnel-coupled to the edge may significantly enhance the inelastic backscattering rate, due to the long dwelling time of an electron in the dot. The added resistance is especially strong for dots carrying an odd number of electrons, due to the Kondo effect. For the same reason, the temperature dependence of the added resistance becomes rather weak. We present a detailed theory of the quantum dot effect on the helical edge resistance. It allows us to make specific predictions for possible future experiments with artificially prepared dots in topological insulators. It also provides a qualitative explanation of the resistance fluctuations observed in short HgTe quantum wells. In addition to the single-dot theory, we develop a statistical description of the helical edge resistivity introduced by random charge puddles in a long heterostructure carrying helical edge states. The presence of charge puddles in long samples may explain the observed coexistence of a high sample resistance with the propagation of electrons along the sample edges.
  • We study the influence of electron puddles created by doping of a 2D topological insulator on its helical edge conductance. A single puddle is modeled by a quantum dot tunnel-coupled to the helical edge. It may lead to significant inelastic backscattering within the edge because of the long electron dwelling time in the dot. We find the resulting correction to the perfect edge conductance. Generalizing to multiple puddles, we assess the dependence of the helical edge resistance on temperature and doping level, and compare it with recent experimental data.
  • We study effects of a gate-controlled Rashba spin-orbit coupling to quantum spin-Hall edge states in HgTe quantum wells. A uniform Rashba coupling can be employed in tuning the spin orientation of the edge states while preserving the time-reversal symmetry. We introduce a sample geometry where the Rashba coupling can be used in probing helicity by purely electrical means without requiring spin detection, application of magnetic materials or magnetic fields. In the considered setup a tilt of the spin orientation with respect to the normal of the sample leads to a reduction in the two-terminal conductance with current-voltage characteristics and temperature dependence typical of Luttinger liquid constrictions.
  • According to the general classification of topological insulators, there exist one-dimensional chirally (sublattice) symmetric systems that can support any number of topological phases. We introduce a zigzag fermion chain with spin-orbit coupling in magnetic field and identify three distinct topological phases. Zero-mode excitations, localized at the phase boundaries, are fractionalized: two of the phase boundaries support $\pm e/2$ charge states while one of the boundaries support $\pm e$ and neutral excitations. In addition, a finite chain exhibits $\pm e/2$ edge states for two of the three phases. We explain how the studied system generalizes the Peierls-distorted polyacetylene model and discuss possible realizations in atomic chains and quantum spin Hall wires.
  • Topological invariants in terms of the Green's function in momentum and real space determine properties of smooth textures within topological media. In space dimension D=1 the topological invariant N_3 in terms of the Green's function G(\omega,k_x,x) determines the fermion number of the 1D soliton, while in space dimension D=3 the topological invariant N_5 in terms of the Green's function G(\omega,k_x,k_y,k_z,z) determines quantization of Hall conductivity in the soliton plane within the topological insulators.