• We perform a three-dimensional triaxial analysis of 16 X-ray regular and 4 high-magnification galaxy clusters selected from the CLASH survey by combining two-dimensional weak-lensing and central strong-lensing constraints. In a Bayesian framework, we constrain the intrinsic structure and geometry of each individual cluster assuming a triaxial Navarro-Frenk-White halo with arbitrary orientations, characterized by the mass $M_{200\mathrm{c}}$, halo concentration $C_{200\mathrm{c}}$, and triaxial axis ratios ($q_{\mathrm{a}} \le q_{\mathrm{b}}$), and investigate scaling relations between these halo structural parameters. From triaxial modeling of the X-ray-selected subsample, we find that the halo concentration decreases with increasing cluster mass, with a mean concentration of $C_{200\mathrm{c}} = 4.82\pm0.30$ at the pivot mass $M_{200\mathrm{c}}=10^{15}M_{\odot}h^{-1}$. This is consistent with the result from spherical modeling, $C_{200\mathrm{c}}=4.51\pm 0.14$. Independently of the priors, the minor-to-major axis ratio $q_{\mathrm{a}}$ of our full sample exhibits a clear deviation from the spherical configuration ($q_{\mathrm{a}}=0.52 \pm 0.04$ at $10^{15}M_{\odot}h^{-1}$ with uniform priors), with a weak dependence on the cluster mass. Combining all 20 clusters, we obtain a joint ensemble constraint on the minor-to-major axis ratio of $q_{\mathrm{a}}=0.652^{+0.162}_{-0.078}$ and a lower bound on the intermediate-to-major axis ratio of $q_{\mathrm{b}}>0.63$ at the $2\sigma$ level from an analysis with uniform priors. Assuming priors on the axis ratios derived from numerical simulations, we constrain the degree of triaxiality for the full sample to be $\mathcal{T}=0.79 \pm 0.03$ at $10^{15}M_{\odot}h^{-1}$, indicating a preference for a prolate geometry of cluster halos. We find no statistical evidence for an orientation bias ($f_{\mathrm{geo}}=0.93 \pm 0.07$) (abridged)
  • We reconstruct the two-dimensional (2D) matter distributions in 20 high-mass galaxy clusters selected from the CLASH survey, by using the new approach of performing a joint weak lensing analysis of 2D shear and azimuthally averaged magnification measurements. This combination allows for a complete analysis of the field, effectively breaking the mass-sheet degeneracy. In a Bayesian framework, we simultaneously constrain the mass profile and morphology of each individual cluster assuming an elliptical Navarro-Frenk-White halo characterized by the mass, concentration, projected axis ratio, and position angle of the projected major axis.. We find that spherical mass estimates of the clusters from azimuthally averaged weak-lensing measurements in previous work are in excellent agreement with our results from a full 2D analysis. Combining all 20 clusters in our sample, we detect the elliptical shape of weak-lensing halos at the $5\sigma$ significance level within a scale of 2Mpc$/h$. The median projected axis ratio is $0.67\pm 0.07$ at a virial mass of $M_\mathrm{vir}=(15.2\pm 2.8) \times 10^{14} M_\odot$, which is in agreement with theoretical predictions of the standard collisionless cold dark matter model. We also study misalignment statistics of brightest cluster galaxy, X-ray, thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, and strong-lensing morphologies with respect to the weak-lensing signal. Among the three baryonic tracers studied here, we find that the X-ray morphology is best aligned with the weak-lensing mass distribution, with a median misalignment angle of $21\pm 7$ degrees. We also conduct a stacked quadrupole shear analysis assuming that the X-ray major axis is aligned with that of the projected mass distribution. This yields a consistent axis ratio of $0.67\pm 0.10$, suggesting again a tight alignment between the intracluster gas and dark matter.
  • We present cosmological parameter constraints from a joint analysis of three cosmological probes: the tomographic cosmic shear signal in $\sim$450 deg$^2$ of data from the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), the galaxy-matter cross-correlation signal of galaxies from the Galaxies And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey determined with KiDS weak lensing, and the angular correlation function of the same GAMA galaxies. We use fast power spectrum estimators that are based on simple integrals over the real-space correlation functions, and show that they are practically unbiased over relevant angular frequency ranges. We test our full pipeline on numerical simulations that are tailored to KiDS and retrieve the input cosmology. By fitting different combinations of power spectra, we demonstrate that the three probes are internally consistent. For all probes combined, we obtain $S_8\equiv \sigma_8 \sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3}=0.800_{-0.027}^{+0.029}$, consistent with Planck and the fiducial KiDS-450 cosmic shear correlation function results. Marginalising over wide priors on the mean of the tomographic redshift distributions yields consistent results for $S_8$ with an increase of $28\%$ in the error. The combination of probes results in a $26\%$ reduction in uncertainties of $S_8$ over using the cosmic shear power spectra alone. The main gain from these additional probes comes through their constraining power on nuisance parameters, such as the galaxy intrinsic alignment amplitude or potential shifts in the redshift distributions, which are up to a factor of two better constrained compared to using cosmic shear alone, demonstrating the value of large-scale structure probe combination.
  • This paper is the first of a series of papers constraining cosmological parameters with weak lensing peak statistics using $\sim 450~\rm deg^2$ of imaging data from the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS-450). We measure high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR: $\nu$) weak lensing convergence peaks in the range of $3<\nu<5$, and employ theoretical models to derive expected values. These models are validated using a suite of simulations. We take into account two major systematic effects, the boost factor and the effect of baryons on the mass-concentration relation of dark matter haloes. In addition, we investigate the impacts of other potential astrophysical systematics including the projection effects of large scale structures, intrinsic galaxy alignments, as well as residual measurement uncertainties in the shear and redshift calibration. Assuming a flat $\Lambda$CDM model, we find constraints for $S_{\rm 8}=\sigma_{\rm 8}(\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3)^{0.5}=0.746^{+0.046}_{-0.107}$ according to the degeneracy direction of the cosmic shear analysis and $\Sigma_{\rm 8}=\sigma_{\rm 8}(\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3)^{0.38}=0.696^{+0.048}_{-0.050}$ based on the derived degeneracy direction of our high-SNR peak statistics. The difference between the power index of $S_{\rm 8}$ and in $\Sigma_{\rm 8}$ indicates that combining the two probes has the potential to break the degeneracy in $\sigma_{\rm 8}$ and $\Omega_{\rm m}$. Our results are consistent with the cosmic shear tomographic correlation analysis of the same dataset and $\sim 2\sigma$ lower than the Planck 2016 results.
  • We study the statistics of peaks in a weak lensing reconstructed mass map of the first 450 square degrees of the Kilo Degree Survey. The map is computed with aperture masses directly applied to the shear field with an NFW-like compensated filter. We compare the peak statistics in the observations with that of simulations for various cosmologies to constrain the cosmological parameter $S_8 = \sigma_8 \sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3}$, which probes the ($\Omega_{\rm m}, \sigma_8$) plane perpendicularly to its main degeneracy. We estimate $S_8=0.750\pm0.059$, using peaks in the signal-to-noise range $0 \leq {\rm S/N} \leq 4$, and accounting for various systematics, such as multiplicative shear bias, mean redshift bias, baryon feedback, intrinsic alignment, and shear-position coupling. These constraints are $\sim25\%$ tighter than the constraints from the high significance peaks alone ($3 \leq {\rm S/N} \leq 4$) which typically trace single-massive halos. This demonstrates the gain of information from low-S/N peaks which correspond to the projection of several small-mass halos along the line-of-sight. Our results are in good agreement with the tomographic shear two-point correlation function measurement in KiDS-450. Combining shear peaks with non-tomographic measurements of the shear two-point correlation functions yields an $\sim20\%$ improvement in the uncertainty on $S_8$ compared to the shear two-point correlation functions alone, highlighting the great potential of peaks as a cosmological probe.
  • We present integral field spectroscopy of galaxy cluster Abell 3827, using ALMA and VLT/MUSE. It reveals an unusual configuration of strong gravitational lensing in the cluster core, with at least seven lensed images of a single background spiral galaxy. Lens modelling based on HST imaging had suggested that the dark matter associated with one of the cluster's central galaxies may be offset. The new spectroscopic data enable better subtraction of foreground light, and better identification of multiple background images. The inferred distribution of dark matter is consistent with being centered on the galaxies, as expected by LCDM. Each galaxy's dark matter also appears to be symmetric. Whilst we do not find an offset between mass and light (suggestive of self-interacting dark matter) as previously reported, the numerical simulations that have been performed to calibrate Abell 3827 indicate that offsets and asymmetry are still worth looking for in collisions with particular geometries. Meanwhile, ALMA proves exceptionally useful for strong lens image identifications.
  • This work explores the ability of computer vision algorithms to characterise dark matter haloes formed in different models of structure formation. We produce surface mass density maps of the most massive haloes in a suite of eight numerical simulations, all based on the same initial conditions, but implementing different models of gravity. This suite includes a standard $\Lambda$CDM model, two variations of $f(R)$-gravity, two variations of Symmetron gravity and three Dvali, Gabadadze and Porrati (DGP) models. We use the publicly available WND-CHARM algorithm to extract 2919 image features from either the raw pixel intensities of the maps, or from a variety of image transformations including Fourier, Wavelet, Chebyshev and Edge transformations. After discarding the most degenerate models, we achieve more than 60% single-image classification success rate in distinguishing the four different models of gravity while using a simple weighted neighbour distance (WND) to define our classification metric. This number can be increased to more than 70% if additional information, such as a rough estimate of the halo mass, is included. We find that the classification success steeply declines when the noise level in the images is increased, but that this trend can be largely reduced by smoothing the noisy data. We find Zernike moments of the Fourier transformation of either the raw image or its Wavelet transformation to be the most descriptive feature, followed by the Gini coefficient of several transformations and the Haralick and Tamura textures of the raw pixel data eventually pre-processed by an Edge transformation. The proposed methodology is general and does not only apply to the characterisation of modified gravity models, but can be used to classify any set of models which show variations in the 2D morphology of their respective structure.
  • We present the tomographic cross-correlation between galaxy lensing measured in the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS-450) with overlapping lensing measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), as detected by Planck 2015. We compare our joint probe measurement to the theoretical expectation for a flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmology, assuming the best-fitting cosmological parameters from the KiDS-450 cosmic shear and Planck CMB analyses. We find that our results are consistent within $1\sigma$ with the KiDS-450 cosmology, with an amplitude re-scaling parameter $A_{\rm KiDS} = 0.86 \pm 0.19$. Adopting a Planck cosmology, we find our results are consistent within $2\sigma$, with $A_{\it Planck} = 0.68 \pm 0.15$. We show that the agreement is improved in both cases when the contamination to the signal by intrinsic galaxy alignments is accounted for, increasing $A$ by $\sim 0.1$. This is the first tomographic analysis of the galaxy lensing -- CMB lensing cross-correlation signal, and is based on five photometric redshift bins. We use this measurement as an independent validation of the multiplicative shear calibration and of the calibrated source redshift distribution at high redshifts. We find that constraints on these two quantities are strongly correlated when obtained from this technique, which should therefore not be considered as a stand-alone competitive calibration tool.
  • Multi-wavelength techniques can probe the distribution and the physical properties of baryons and dark matter in galaxy clusters from the inner regions out to the peripheries. We present a full three-dimensional analysis combining strong and weak lensing, X-ray surface brightness and temperature, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. The method is applied to MACS J1206.2-0847, a remarkably regular, face-on, massive, M_{200}=(1.1+-0.2)*10^{15}M_Sun/h, cluster at z=0.44. The measured concentration, c_{200}=6.3+-1.2, and the triaxial shape are common to halos formed in a LCDM scenario. The gas has settled in and follows the shape of the gravitational potential, which is evidence of pressure equilibrium via the shape theorem. There is no evidence for significant non-thermal pressure and the equilibrium is hydrostatic.
  • We describe and test the pipeline used to measure the weak lensing shear signal from the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS). It includes a novel method of `self-calibration' that partially corrects for the effect of noise bias. We also discuss the `weight bias' that may arise in optimally-weighted measurements, and present a scheme to mitigate that bias. To study the residual biases arising from both galaxy selection and shear measurement, and to derive an empirical correction to reduce the shear biases to $\lesssim 1\%$, we create a suite of simulated images whose properties are close to those of the KiDS survey observations. We find that the use of `self-calibration' reduces the additive and multiplicative shear biases significantly, although further correction via a calibration scheme is required, which also corrects for a dependence of the bias on galaxy properties. We find that the calibration relation itself is biased by the use of noisy, measured galaxy properties, which may limit the final accuracy that can be achieved. We assess the accuracy of the calibration in the tomographic bins used for the KiDS cosmic shear analysis, testing in particular the effect of possible variations in the uncertain distributions of galaxy size, magnitude and ellipticity, and conclude that the calibration procedure is accurate at the level of multiplicative bias $\lesssim 1\%$ required for the KiDS cosmic shear analysis.
  • We present a joint analysis of Chandra X-ray observations, Bolocam thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect observations, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) strong lensing data, and HST and Subaru Suprime-Cam weak lensing data. The multiwavelength dataset is used to constrain parametric models for the distribution of dark and baryonic matter in a sample of six massive galaxy clusters selected from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). For five of the six clusters, the multiwavelength dataset is well described by a relatively simple model that assumes spherical symmetry, hydrostatic equilibrium, and entirely thermal pressure support. The joint analysis yields considerably better constraints on the total mass and concentration of the cluster compared to analysis of any one dataset individually. The subsample of five galaxy clusters is used to place an upper limit on the fraction of pressure support in the intracluster medium (ICM) due to nonthermal processes, such as turbulence and bulk flow of the gas. We constrain the nonthermal pressure fraction at r500c to be less than 0.11 at 95 percent confidence. This is in tension with state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations, which predict a nonthermal pressure fraction of approximately 0.25 at r500c for clusters of similar mass and redshift. This tension may be explained by the sample selection and/or our assumption of spherical symmetry.
  • Many applications and algorithms in the field of gravitational lensing make use of meshes with a finite number of nodes to analyze and manipulate data. Specific examples in lensing are astronomical CCD images in general, the reconstruction of density distributions from lensing data, lens-source plane mapping or the characterization and interpolation of a point-spread-function. We present a numerical framework to interpolate and differentiate in the mesh-free domain, defined by nodes with coordinates that follow no regular pattern. The framework is based on radial basis functions (RBFs) to smoothly represent data around the nodes. We demonstrate the performance of Gaussian RBF-based, mesh-free interpolation and differentiation, which reaches the sub-percent level in both cases. We use our newly developed framework to translate ideas of free-form mass reconstruction from lensing onto the mesh-free domain. By reconstructing a simulated mock lens we find that strong lensing only reconstructions achieve < 10% accuracy in the areas where these constraints are available but provide poorer results when departing from these regions. Weak-lensing only reconstructions give < 10% percent accuracy outside the strong lensing regime, but cannot resolve the inner core structure of the lens. Once both regimes are combined, accurate reconstructions can be achieved over the full field of view. The reconstruction of a simulated lens, using constraints that mimics real observations, yields accurate results in terms of surface-mass density, NFW parameter, Einstein radius and magnification map recovery, encouraging the application of this method to real data.
  • We measure the SZ signal toward a set of 47 clusters with a median mass of $9.5 \times 10^{14}$ M$_{\odot}$ and a median redshift of 0.40 using data from Planck and the ground-based Bolocam receiver. When Planck XMM-like masses are used to set the scale radius $\theta_{\textrm{s}}$, we find consistency between the integrated SZ signal, $Y_{\textrm{5R500}}$, derived from Bolocam and Planck based on gNFW model fits using A10 shape parameters, with an average ratio of $1.069 \pm 0.030$ (allowing for the $\simeq 5$% Bolocam flux calibration uncertainty). We also perform a joint fit to the Bolocam and Planck data using a modified A10 model with the outer logarithmic slope $\beta$ allowed to vary, finding $\beta = 6.13 \pm 0.16 \pm 0.76$ (measurement error followed by intrinsic scatter). In addition, we find that the value of $\beta$ scales with mass and redshift according to $\beta \propto M^{0.077 \pm 0.026} \times (1+z)^{-0.06 \pm 0.09}$. This mass scaling is in good agreement with recent simulations. We do not observe the strong trend of $\beta$ with redshift seen in simulations, though we conclude that this is most likely due to our sample selection. Finally, we use Bolocam measurements of $Y_{500}$ to test the accuracy of the Planck completeness estimate. We find consistency, with the actual number of Planck detections falling approximately $1 \sigma$ below the expectation from Bolocam. We translate this small difference into a constraint on the the effective mass bias for the Planck cluster cosmology results, with $(1-b) = 0.93 \pm 0.06$.
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of strong-lensing, weak-lensing shear and magnification data for a sample of 16 X-ray-regular and 4 high-magnification galaxy clusters selected from the CLASH survey. Our analysis combines constraints from 16-band HST observations and wide-field multi-color imaging taken primarily with Subaru/Suprime-Cam. We reconstruct surface mass density profiles of individual clusters from a joint analysis of the full lensing constraints, and determine masses and concentrations for all clusters. We find internal consistency of the ensemble mass calibration to be $\le 5\% \pm 6\%$ by comparison with the CLASH weak-lensing-only measurements of Umetsu et al. For the X-ray-selected subsample, we examine the concentration-mass relation and its intrinsic scatter using a Bayesian regression approach. Our model yields a mean concentration of $c|_{z=0.34} = 3.95 \pm 0.35$ at $M_{200c} \simeq 14\times 10^{14}M_\odot$ and an intrinsic scatter of $\sigma(\ln c_{200c}) = 0.13 \pm 0.06$, in excellent agreement with LCDM predictions when the CLASH selection function based on X-ray morphological regularity and the projection effects are taken into account. We also derive an ensemble-averaged surface mass density profile for the X-ray-selected subsample by stacking their individual profiles. The stacked mass profile is well described by a family of density profiles predicted for cuspy dark-matter-dominated halos, namely, the NFW, Einasto, and DARKexp models, whereas the single power-law, cored isothermal and Burkert density profiles are disfavored by the data. We show that cuspy halo models that include the two-halo term provide improved agreement with the data. For the NFW halo model, we measure a mean concentration of $c_{200c} = 3.79^{+0.30}_{-0.28}$ at $M_{200c} = 14.1^{+1.0}_{-1.0}\times 10^{14}M_\odot$, demonstrating consistency between complementary analysis methods.
  • We present a weak-lensing analysis of the merging {\em Frontier Fields} (FF) cluster Abell~2744 using new Subaru/Suprime-Cam imaging. The wide-field lensing mass distribution reveals this cluster is comprised of four distinct substructures. Simultaneously modeling the two-dimensional reduced shear field using a combination of a Navarro--Frenk--White (NFW) model for the main core and truncated NFW models for the subhalos, we determine their masses and locations. The total mass of the system is constrained as $M_\mathrm{200c} = (2.06\pm0.42)\times10^{15}\,M_\odot$. The most massive clump is the southern component with $M_\mathrm{200c} = (7.7\pm3.4)\times10^{14}\,M_\odot$, followed by the western substructure ($M_\mathrm{200c} = (4.5\pm2.0)\times10^{14}\,M_\odot$) and two smaller substructures to the northeast ($M_\mathrm{200c} = (2.8\pm1.6)\times10^{14}\,M_\odot$) and northwest ($M_\mathrm{200c} = (1.9\pm1.2)\times10^{14}\,M_\odot$). The presence of the four substructures supports the picture of multiple mergers. Using a composite of hydrodynamical binary simulations we explain this complicated system without the need for a "slingshot" effect to produce the northwest X-ray interloper, as previously proposed. The locations of the substructures appear to be offset from both the gas ($87^{+34}_{-28}$ arcsec, 90\% CL) and the galaxies ($72^{+34}_{-53}$ arcsec, 90\% CL) in the case of the northwestern and western subhalos. To confirm or refute these findings, high resolution space-based observations extending beyond the current FF limited coverage to the west and northwestern area are essential.
  • We developed an algorithm to find and characterize gravitationally lensed galaxies (arcs) to perform a comparison of the observed and simulated arc abundance. Observations are from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Simulated CLASH images are created using the MOKA package and also clusters selected from the high resolution, hydrodynamical simulations, MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH sample. The algorithm' s arc elongation accuracy, completeness and false positive rate are determined and used to compute an estimate of the true arc abundance. We derive a lensing efficiency of $4 \pm 1$ arcs (with length $\ge 6"$ and length-to-width ratio $\ge 7$) per cluster for the X-ray selected CLASH sample, $4 \pm 1$ arcs per cluster for the MOKA simulated sample and $3 \pm 1$ arcs per cluster for the MUSIC simulated sample. The observed and simulated arc statistics are in full agreement. We measure the photometric redshifts of all detected arcs and find a median redshift $z_s = 1.9$ with 33% of the detected arcs having $z_s > 3$. We find that the arc abundance does not depend strongly on the source redshift distribution but is sensitive to the mass distribution of the dark matter halos (e.g. the $c-M$ relation). Our results show that consistency between the observed and simulated distributions of lensed arc sizes and axial ratios can be achieved by using cluster-lensing simulations that are carefully matched to the selection criteria used in the observations.
  • SN HFF14Tom is a Type Ia Supernova (SN) discovered at z = 1.3457 +- 0.0001 behind the galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z = 0.308). In a cosmology-independent analysis, we find that HFF14Tom is 0.77 +- 0.15 magnitudes brighter than unlensed Type Ia SNe at similar redshift, implying a lensing magnification of mu_obs = 2.03 +- 0.29. This observed magnification provides a rare opportunity for a direct empirical test of galaxy cluster lens models. Here we test 17 lens models, 13 of which were generated before the SN magnification was known, qualifying as pure "blind tests". The models are collectively fairly accurate: 8 of the models deliver median magnifications that are consistent with the measured mu to within 1-sigma. However, there is a subtle systematic bias: the significant disagreements all involve models overpredicting the magnification. We evaluate possible causes for this mild bias, and find no single physical or methodological explanation to account for it. We do find that model accuracy can be improved to some extent with stringent quality cuts on multiply-imaged systems, such as requiring that a large fraction have spectroscopic redshifts. In addition to testing model accuracies as we have done here, Type Ia SN magnifications could also be used as inputs for future lens models of Abell 2744 and other clusters, providing valuable constraints in regions where traditional strong- and weak-lensing information is unavailable.
  • We present profiles of temperature (Tx), gas mass, and hydrostatic mass estimated from new and archival X-ray observations of CLASH clusters. We compare measurements derived from XMM and Chandra observations with one another and compare both to gravitational lensing mass profiles derived with CLASH HST and ground-based lensing data. Radial profiles of Chandra and XMM electron density and enclosed gas mass are nearly identical, indicating that differences in hydrostatic masses inferred from X-ray observations arise from differences in Tx measurements. Encouragingly, cluster Txs are consistent with one another at ~100-200 kpc radii but XMM Tx systematically decline relative to Chandra Tx at larger radii. The angular dependence of the discrepancy suggests additional investigation on systematics such as the XMM point spread function correction, vignetting and off-axis responses. We present the CLASH-X mass-profile comparisons in the form of cosmology-independent and redshift-independent circular-velocity profiles. Ratios of Chandra HSE mass profiles to CLASH lensing profiles show no obvious radial dependence in the 0.3-0.8 Mpc range. However, the mean mass biases inferred from the WL and SaWLens data are different. e.g., the weighted-mean value at 0.5 Mpc is <b> = 0.12 for the WL comparison and <b> = -0.11 for the SaWLens comparison. The ratios of XMM HSE mass profiles to CLASH lensing profiles show a pronounced radial dependence in the 0.3-1.0 Mpc range, with a weighted mean mass bias of value rising to <b>~0.3 at ~1 Mpc for the WL comparison and <b> of 0.25 for SaWLens comparison. The enclosed gas mass profiles from both Chandra and XMM rise to a value 1/8 times the total-mass profiles inferred from lensing at 0.5 Mpc and remain constant outside of that radius, suggesting that [8xMgas] profiles may be an excellent proxy for total-mass profiles at >0.5 Mpc in massive galaxy clusters.
  • We present results from a comprehensive lensing analysis in HST data, of the complete CLASH cluster sample. We identify new multiple-images previously undiscovered allowing improved or first constraints on the cluster inner mass distributions and profiles. We combine these strong-lensing constraints with weak-lensing shape measurements within the HST FOV to jointly constrain the mass distributions. The analysis is performed in two different common parameterizations (one adopts light-traces-mass for both galaxies and dark matter while the other adopts an analytical, elliptical NFW form for the dark matter), to provide a better assessment of the underlying systematics - which is most important for deep, cluster-lensing surveys, especially when studying magnified high-redshift objects. We find that the typical (median), relative systematic differences throughout the central FOV are $\sim40\%$ in the (dimensionless) mass density, $\kappa$, and $\sim20\%$ in the magnification, $\mu$. We show maps of these differences for each cluster, as well as the mass distributions, critical curves, and 2D integrated mass profiles. For the Einstein radii ($z_{s}=2$) we find that all typically agree within $10\%$ between the two models, and Einstein masses agree, typically, within $\sim15\%$. At larger radii, the total projected, 2D integrated mass profiles of the two models, within $r\sim2\arcmin$, differ by $\sim30\%$. Stacking the surface-density profiles of the sample from the two methods together, we obtain an average slope of $d\log (\Sigma)/d\log(r)\sim-0.64\pm0.1$, in the radial range [5,350] kpc. Lastly, we also characterize the behavior of the average magnification, surface density, and shear differences between the two models, as a function of both the radius from the center, and the best-fit values of these quantities.
  • We present a joint shear-and-magnification weak-lensing analysis of a sample of 16 X-ray-regular and 4 high-magnification galaxy clusters at 0.19<z<0.69 selected from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Our analysis uses wide-field multi-color imaging, taken primarily with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. From a stacked shear-only analysis of the X-ray-selected subsample, we detect the ensemble-averaged lensing signal with a total signal-to-noise ratio of ~25 in the radial range of 200 to 3500kpc/h. The stacked tangential-shear signal is well described by a family of standard density profiles predicted for dark-matter-dominated halos in gravitational equilibrium, namely the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW), truncated variants of NFW, and Einasto models. For the NFW model, we measure a mean concentration of $c_{200c}=4.01^{+0.35}_{-0.32}$ at $M_{200c}=1.34^{+0.10}_{-0.09} 10^{15}M_{\odot}$. We show this is in excellent agreement with Lambda cold-dark-matter (LCDM) predictions when the CLASH X-ray selection function and projection effects are taken into account. The best-fit Einasto shape parameter is $\alpha_E=0.191^{+0.071}_{-0.068}$, which is consistent with the NFW-equivalent Einasto parameter of $\sim 0.18$. We reconstruct projected mass density profiles of all CLASH clusters from a joint likelihood analysis of shear-and-magnification data, and measure cluster masses at several characteristic radii. We also derive an ensemble-averaged total projected mass profile of the X-ray-selected subsample by stacking their individual mass profiles. The stacked total mass profile, constrained by the shear+magnification data, is shown to be consistent with our shear-based halo-model predictions including the effects of surrounding large-scale structure as a two-halo term, establishing further consistency in the context of the LCDM model.
  • We report observations of three gravitationally lensed supernovae (SNe) in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. These objects, SN CLO12Car (z = 1.28), SN CLN12Did (z = 0.85), and SN CLA11Tib (z = 1.14), are located behind three different clusters, MACSJ1720.2+3536 (z = 0.391), RXJ1532.9+3021 (z = 0.345), and Abell 383 (z = 0.187), respectively. Each SN was detected in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical and infrared images. Based on photometric classification, we find that SNe CLO12Car and CLN12Did are likely to be Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), while the classification of SN CLA11Tib is inconclusive. Using multi-color light-curve fits to determine a standardized SN Ia luminosity distance, we infer that SN CLO12Car was approximately 1.0 +/- 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia at a similar redshift and ascribe this to gravitational lens magnification. Similarly, SN CLN12Did is approximately 0.2 +/- 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia. We derive independent estimates of the predicted magnification from CLASH strong+weak lensing maps of the clusters: 0.83 +/- 0.16 mag for SN CLO12Car, 0.28 +/- 0.08 mag for SN CLN12Did, and 0.43 +/- 0.11 mag for SN CLA11Tib. The two SNe Ia provide a new test of the cluster lens model predictions: we find that the magnifications based on the SN Ia brightness and those predicted by the lens maps are consistent. Our results herald the promise of future observations of samples of cluster-lensed SNe Ia (from the ground or space) to help illuminate the dark-matter distribution in clusters of galaxies, through the direct determination of absolute magnifications.
  • A pressureless scenario for the Dark Matter (DM) fluid is a widely adopted hypothesis, despite the absence of a direct observational evidence. According to general relativity, the total mass-energy content of a system shapes the gravitational potential well, but different test particles perceive this potential in different ways depending on their properties. Cluster galaxy velocities, being $\ll$c, depend solely on the gravitational potential, whereas photon trajectories reflect the contributions from the gravitational potential plus a relativistic-pressure term that depends on the cluster mass. We exploit this phenomenon to constrain the Equation of State (EoS) parameter of the fluid, primarily DM, contained in galaxy clusters. We use the complementary information provided by the kinematic and lensing mass profiles of the galaxy cluster MACS 1206.2-0847 at $z=0.44$, as obtained in an extensive imaging and spectroscopic campaign within the CLASH survey. The unprecedented high quality of our data-set and the properties of this cluster are well suited to determine the EoS parameter of the cluster fluid. Since baryons contribute at most $15\%$ to the total mass in clusters and their pressure is negligible, the EoS parameter we derive describes the behavior of the DM fluid. We obtain the most stringent constraint on the DM EoS parameter to date, $w=(p_r+2\,p_t)/(3\,c^2\rho)=0.00\pm0.15\mathrm{(stat)}\pm0.08\mathrm{(syst)}$, averaged over the radial range $0.5\,\mathrm{Mpc}\leq$$r$$\leq$$r_{200}$, where $p_r$ and $p_t$ are the radial and tangential pressure, and $\rho$ is the density. We plan to further improve our constraint by applying the same procedure to all clusters from the ongoing CLASH-VLT program.
  • The galaxy cluster MACS J0717.5+3745 (z=0.55) is the largest known cosmic lens, with complex internal structures seen in deep X-ray, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect and dynamical observations. We perform a combined weak and strong lensing analysis with wide-field BVRi'z' Subaru/Suprime-Cam observations and 16-band Hubble Space Telescope observations taken as part of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). We find consistent weak distortion and magnification measurements of background galaxies, and combine these signals to construct an optimally estimated radial mass profile of the cluster and its surrounding large-scale structure out to 5 Mpc/h. We find consistency between strong-lensing and weak-lensing in the region where these independent data overlap, <500 kpc/h. The two-dimensional weak-lensing map reveals a clear filamentary structure traced by distinct mass halos. We model the lensing shear field with 9 halos, including the main cluster, corresponding to mass peaks detected above 2.5\sigma_\kappa. The total mass of the cluster as determined by the different methods is M_{vir}=(2.8\pm0.4) \times 10^15 M_sun. Although this is the most massive cluster known at z>0.5, in terms of extreme value statistics we conclude that the mass of MACS J0717.5+3745 by itself is not in serious tension with LambdaCDM, representing only a ~2{\sigma} departure above the maximum simulated halo mass at this redshift.
  • We provide a new observational test for a key prediction of the \Lambda CDM cosmological model: the contributions of mergers with different halo-to-main-cluster mass ratios to cluster-sized halo growth. We perform this test by dynamically analyzing seven galaxy clusters, spanning the redshift range $0.13 < z_c < 0.45$ and caustic mass range $0.4-1.5$ $10^{15} h_{0.73}^{-1}$ M$_{\odot}$, with an average of 293 spectroscopically-confirmed bound galaxies to each cluster. The large radial coverage (a few virial radii), which covers the whole infall region, with a high number of spectroscopically identified galaxies enables this new study. For each cluster, we identify bound galaxies. Out of these galaxies, we identify infalling and accreted halos and estimate their masses and their dynamical states. Using the estimated masses, we derive the contribution of different mass ratios to cluster-sized halo growth. For mass ratios between ~0.2 and ~0.7, we find a ~1 $\sigma$ agreement with \Lambda CDM expectations based on the Millennium simulations I and II. At low mass ratios, $\lesssim 0.2$, our derived contribution is underestimated since the detection efficiency decreases at low masses, $\sim 2 \times 10^{14}$ $h_{0.73}^{-1}$ M$_{\odot}$. At large mass ratios, $\gtrsim 0.7$, we do not detect halos probably because our sample, which was chosen to be quite X-ray relaxed, is biased against large mass ratios. Therefore, at large mass ratios, the derived contribution is also underestimated.
  • In this work we analyze the mass distribution of MACSJ1206.2-0847, especially focusing on the halo properties of its cluster members. The cluster appears relaxed in its X-ray emission, but has significant amounts of intracluster light which is not centrally concentrated, suggesting that galaxy-scale interactions are still ongoing despite the overall relaxed state. The cluster lenses 12 background galaxies into multiple images and one galaxy at $z=1.033$ into a giant arc and its counterimage. The multiple image positions and the surface brightness distribution (SFB) of the arc which is bent around several cluster members are sensitive to the cluster galaxy halo properties. We model the cluster mass distribution with a NFW profile and the galaxy halos with two parameters for the mass normalization and extent of a reference halo assuming scalings with their observed NIR--light. We match the multiple image positions at an r.m.s. level of $0.85\arcsec$ and can reconstruct the SFB distribution of the arc in several filters to a remarkable accuracy based on this cluster model. The length scale where the enclosed galaxy halo mass is best constrained is about 5 effective radii -- a scale in between those accessible to dynamical and field strong lensing mass estimates on one hand and galaxy--galaxy weak lensing results on the other hand. The velocity dispersion and halo size of a galaxy with $m_{\rm 160W,AB}=19.2$ or $M_{\rm B,Vega}=-20.7$ are $\sigma=150 \rm kms^{-1}$ and $r\approx 26\pm 6 \rm kpc$, indicating that the halos of the cluster galaxies are tidally stripped. We also reconstruct the unlensed source (which is smaller by a factor of $\sim5.8$ in area), demonstrating the increase of morphological information due to lensing and conclude that this galaxy has likely star--forming spiral arms with a red (older) central component.