• We age-date the stellar populations associated with 12 historic nearby core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and 2 supernova impostors, and from these ages, we infer their initial masses and associated uncertainties. To do this, we have obtained new HST imaging covering these CCSNe. Using these images, we measure resolved stellar photometry for the stars surrounding the locations of the SNe. We then fit the color-magnitude distributions of this photometry with stellar evolution models to determine the ages of any young existing populations present. From these age distributions, we infer the most likely progenitor mass for all of the SNe in our sample. We find ages between 4 and 50 Myr, corresponding to masses from 7.5 to 59 solar masses. There were no SNe that lacked a young population within 50~pc. Our sample contains 4 type Ib/c SNe; their masses have a wide range of values, suggesting that the progenitors of stripped-envelope SNe are binary systems. Both impostors have masses constrained to be $\lesssim$7.5 solar masses. In cases with precursor imaging measurements, we find that age-dating and precursor imaging give consistent progenitor masses. This consistency implies that, although the uncertainties for each technique are significantly different, the results of both are reliable to the measured uncertainties. We combine these new measurements with those from our previous work and find that the distribution of 25 core-collapse SNe progenitor masses is consistent with a standard Salpeter power-law mass function, no upper mass cutoff, and an assumed minimum mass for core-collapse of 7.5~M$_{\odot}$.
  • Using the star formation histories (SFHs) near 94 supernova remnants (SNRs), we infer the progenitor mass distribution for core-collapse supernovae. We use Bayesian inference and model each SFH with multiple bursts of star formation (SF), one of which is assumed to be associated with the SNR. Assuming single-star evolution, the minimum mass of CCSNe is $7.33^{+0.02}_{-0.16}$ $\text{M}_\odot$, the slope of the progenitor mass distribution is $\alpha = -2.96^{+0.45}_{-0.25}$, and the maximum mass is greater than $\text{M}_\textrm{max} > 59$ $\text{M}_\odot$ with a 68% confidence. While these results are consistent with previous inferences, they also provide tighter constraints. The progenitor distribution is somewhat steeper than a Salpeter initial mass function ($\alpha$ = -2.35). This suggests that either SNR catalogs are biased against the youngest SF regions, or the most massive stars do not explode as easily as lower mass stars. If SNR catalogs are biased, it will most likely affect the slope but not the minimum mass. The uncertainties are dominated by three primary sources of uncertainty, the SFH resolution, the number of SF bursts, and the uncertainty on SF rate in each age bin. We address the first two of these uncertainties, with an emphasis on multiple bursts. The third will be addressed in future work.
  • We map the star formation history across M31 by fitting stellar evolution models to color-magnitude diagrams of each 83$''{\times}$83$''$ (0.3$\times$1.4 kpc, deprojected) region of the PHAT survey outside of the innermost 6$'{\times}$12$'$ portion. We find that most of the star formation occurred prior to $\sim$8 Gyr ago, followed by a relatively quiescent period until $\sim$4 Gyr ago, a subsequent star formation episode about 2 Gyr ago and a return to relative quiescence. There appears to be little, if any, structure visible for populations with ages older than 2 Gyr, suggesting significant mixing since that epoch. Finally, assuming a Kroupa IMF from 0.1$-$100 M$_{\odot}$, we find that the total amount of star formation over the past 14 Gyr in the area over which we have fit models is 5${\times}$10$^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$. Fitting the radial distribution of this star formation and assuming azimuthal symmetry, (1.5$\pm$0.2)${\times}$10$^{11}$ M$_{\odot}$ of stars have formed in the M31 disk as a whole, (9$\pm$2)${\times}$10$^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$ of which has likely survived to the present after accounting for evolutionary effects. This mass is about one fifth of the total dynamical mass of M31.
  • We present a framework to simultaneously constrain the values and uncertainties of the strength of convective core overshooting, metallicity, extinction, distance, and age in stellar populations. We then apply the framework to archival Hubble Space Telescope observations of six stellar clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud that have reported ages between ~1-2.5 Gyr. Assuming a canonical value of the strength of core convective overshooting, we recover the well-known age-metallicity correlation, and additional correlations between metallicity and extinction and metallicity and distance. If we allow the strength of core overshooting to vary, we find that for intermediate-aged stellar clusters, the measured values of distance and extinction are negligibly effected by uncertainties of core overshooting strength. However, cluster age and metallicity may have disconcertingly large systematic shifts when core overshooting strength is allowed to vary by more than +/- 0.05 Hp. Using the six stellar clusters, we combine their posterior distribution functions to obtain the most probable core overshooting value, 0.500 +0.016 -0.134 Hp, which is in line with canonical values.
  • We measure the mass function for a sample of 840 young star clusters with ages between 10-300 Myr observed by the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey in M31. The data show clear evidence of a high-mass truncation: only 15 clusters more massive than $10^4$ $M_{\odot}$ are observed, compared to $\sim$100 expected for a canonical $M^{-2}$ pure power-law mass function with the same total number of clusters above the catalog completeness limit. Adopting a Schechter function parameterization, we fit a characteristic truncation mass of $M_c = 8.5^{+2.8}_{-1.8} \times 10^3$ $M_{\odot}$. While previous studies have measured cluster mass function truncations, the characteristic truncation mass we measure is the lowest ever reported. Combining this M31 measurement with previous results, we find that the cluster mass function truncation correlates strongly with the characteristic star formation rate surface density of the host galaxy, where $M_c \propto$ $\langle \Sigma_{\mathrm{SFR}} \rangle^{\sim1.1}$. We also find evidence that suggests the observed $M_c$-$\Sigma_{\mathrm{SFR}}$ relation also applies to globular clusters, linking the two populations via a common formation pathway. If so, globular cluster mass functions could be useful tools for constraining the star formation properties of their progenitor host galaxies in the early Universe.
  • Accounting for nebular emission when modeling galaxy spectral energy distributions (SEDs) is important, as both line and continuum emission can contribute significantly to the total observed flux. In this work, we present a new nebular emission model integrated within the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis code that computes the total line and continuum emission for complex stellar populations using the photoionization code Cloudy. The self-consistent coupling of the nebular emission to the matched ionizing spectrum produces emission line intensities that correctly scale with the stellar population as a function of age and metallicity. This more complete model of galaxy SEDs will improve estimates of global gas properties derived with diagnostic diagrams, star formation rates based on H$\alpha$, and stellar masses derived from NIR broadband photometry. Our models agree well with results from other photoionization models and are able to reproduce observed emission from H II regions and star-forming galaxies. Our models show improved agreement with the observed H II regions in the Ne III/O II plane and show satisfactory agreement with He II emission from $z=2$ galaxies when including rotating stellar models. Models including post-asymptotic giant branch stars are able to reproduce line ratios consistent with low-ionization emission regions (LIERs).
  • We present a sample of 224 stars that emit H$\alpha$ (H$\alpha$ stars) in the Andromeda galaxy (M31). The stars were selected from $\sim$ 5000 spectra, collected as part of the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo survey using Keck II/DEIMOS. We used six-filter Hubble Space Telescope photometry from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey to classify and investigate the properties of the H$\alpha$ stars. We identified five distinct categories of H$\alpha$ star: B-type main sequence (MS) stars, `transitioning'-MS (T-MS) stars, red core He burning (RHeB) stars, non-C-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, and C-rich AGB stars. We found $\sim$ 12 per cent of B-type stars exhibit H$\alpha$ emission (Be stars). The frequency of Be to all B stars is known to vary with the metallicity of their environment. Comparing this proportion of Be stars with other environments around the Local Group, the result could indicate that M31 is more metal rich than the Milky Way. We predict that the 17 T-MS H$\alpha$ stars are Be stars evolving off the MS with fading H$\alpha$ emission. We separated RHeB from AGB H$\alpha$ stars. We conclude that the 61 RHeB and AGB stars are likely to be Long Period Variables. We found that $\sim$ 14 per cent of C-rich AGB stars (C stars) emit H$\alpha$, which is an upper limit for the ratio of C-rich Miras to C stars. This catalogue of H$\alpha$ stars will be useful to constrain stellar evolutionary models, calibrate distance indicators for intermediate age populations, and investigate the properties of M31.
  • We present synthetic far- and near-ultraviolet (FUV and NUV) maps of M31, both with and without dust reddening. These maps were constructed from spatially-resolved star formation histories (SFHs) derived from optical Hubble Space Telescope imaging of resolved stars, taken as part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury program. We use stellar population synthesis modeling to generate synthetic UV maps with projected spatial resolution of $\sim$100 pc ($\sim$24 arcseconds) The predicted UV flux agrees well with the observed flux, with median ratios between the modeled and observed flux of $\log_{10}(f^{syn}/f^{obs}) = 0.03\pm0.24$ and $-0.03\pm0.16$ in the FUV and NUV, respectively. This agreement is particularly impressive given that we used only optical photometry to construct these UV maps. We use the dust-free maps to examine properties of obscured flux and star formation by comparing our reddened and dust-free FUV flux maps with the observed FUV and FUV+24{\mu}m flux to examine the fraction of obscured flux. The synthetic flux maps require that $\sim$90% of the FUV flux in M31 is obscured by dust, while the GALEX-based methods suggest that $\sim$70% of the flux is obscured. This increase in the obscured flux estimate is driven by significant differences between the dust-free synthetic FUV flux and that derived when correcting the observed FUV for dust with 24{\mu}m observations. The difference is further illustrated when we compare the SFRs derived from the FUV+24{\mu}m flux with the 100 Myr average SFR from the SFHs. The 24{\mu}m-corrected FUV flux underestimates the SFR by a factor of $\sim$2.3 - 2.5. [abridged]
  • There is evidence that the well-established mass-metallicity relation in galaxies is correlated with a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The strength of this correlation may be used to disentangle the relative importance of different physical processes (e.g., infall of pristine gas, metal-enriched outflows) in governing chemical evolution. However, all three parameters are susceptible to biases that might affect the observed strength of the relation between them. We analyze possible sources of systematic error, including sample bias, application of signal-to-noise ratio cuts on emission lines, choice of metallicity calibration, uncertainty in stellar mass determination, aperture effects, and dust. We present the first analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity, and SFR using strong line abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. (2013) for ~130,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and provide a detailed comparison of these diagnostics in an appendix. Using these abundance diagnostics yields a 30-55% weaker anti-correlation between metallicity and SFR at fixed stellar mass than that reported by Mannucci et al. (2010). We find that, for all abundance diagnostics, the anti-correlation with SFR is stronger for the relatively few galaxies whose current SFRs are elevated above their past average SFRs. This is also true for the new abundance diagnostic of Dopita et al. (2016), which gives anti-correlation between metallicity and SFR only in the high specific star formation rate (sSFR) regime, in contrast to the recent results of Kashino et al. (2016). The poorly constrained strength of the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR must be carefully accounted for in theoretical studies of chemical evolution.
  • The recent star formation history (SFH) in the outer disk of NGC 300 is presented through the analysis of color magnitude diagrams (CMDs). We analyze resolved stellar photometry by creating CMDs from four Hubble Space Telescope fields containing a combination of images from the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the UVIS imager aboard the Wide Field Camera 3. From the best models of these CMDs, we derive the SFH in order to extract the young stellar component for the past 200 Myrs. We find that the young stellar disk of NGC 300 is unbroken out to at least ${\sim}$8 scale lengths (including an upper limit out to ${\sim}$10 scale lengths) with $r{_s}$ = 1.4 ${\pm}$ 0.1 kpc, which is similar to the total stellar surface brightness profile. This unbroken profile suggests that NGC 300 is undisturbed, similar to the isolated disk galaxy NGC 2403. We compare the environments of NGC 300, NGC 2403, and M33 along with the properties of the gas and stellar disks. We find that the disturbed HI outer disk morphology is not accompanied by a break in the young stellar disk. This may indicate that processes which affect the outer HI morphology may not leave an imprint on the young stellar disk.
  • We present the Bayesian Extinction And Stellar Tool (BEAST), a probabilistic approach to modeling the dust extinguished photometric spectral energy distribution of an individual star while accounting for observational uncertainties common to large resolved star surveys. Given a set of photometric measurements and an observational uncertainty model, the BEAST infers the physical properties of the stellar source using stellar evolution and atmosphere models and constrains the line of sight extinction using a newly developed mixture model that encompasses the full range of dust extinction curves seen in the Local Group. The BEAST is specifically formulated for use with large multi-band surveys of resolved stellar populations. Our approach accounts for measurement uncertainties and any covariance between them due to stellar crowding (both systematic biases and uncertainties in the bias) and absolute flux calibration, thereby incorporating the full information content of the measurement. We illustrate the accuracy and precision possible with the BEAST using data from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. While the BEAST has been developed for this survey, it can be easily applied to similar existing and planned resolved star surveys.
  • We use the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey dataset to perform spatially resolved measurements of star cluster formation efficiency ($\Gamma$), the fraction of stellar mass formed in long-lived star clusters. We use robust star formation history and cluster parameter constraints, obtained through color-magnitude diagram analysis of resolved stellar populations, to study Andromeda's cluster and field populations over the last $\sim$300 Myr. We measure $\Gamma$ of 4-8% for young, 10-100 Myr old populations in M31. We find that cluster formation efficiency varies systematically across the M31 disk, consistent with variations in mid-plane pressure. These $\Gamma$ measurements expand the range of well-studied galactic environments, providing precise constraints in an HI-dominated, low intensity star formation environment. Spatially resolved results from M31 are broadly consistent with previous trends observed on galaxy-integrated scales, where $\Gamma$ increases with increasing star formation rate surface density ($\Sigma_{\mathrm{SFR}}$). However, we can explain observed scatter in the relation and attain better agreement between observations and theoretical models if we account for environmental variations in gas depletion time ($\tau_{\mathrm{dep}}$) when modeling $\Gamma$, accounting for the qualitative shift in star formation behavior when transitioning from a H$_2$-dominated to a HI-dominated interstellar medium. We also demonstrate that $\Gamma$ measurements in high $\Sigma_{\mathrm{SFR}}$ starburst systems are well-explained by $\tau_{\mathrm{dep}}$-dependent fiducial $\Gamma$ models.
  • Thermally-Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch (TP-AGB) stars are relatively short lived (less than a few Myr), yet their cool effective temperatures, high luminosities, efficient mass-loss and dust production can dramatically effect the chemical enrichment histories and the spectral energy distributions of their host galaxies. The ability to accurately model TP-AGB stars is critical to the interpretation of the integrated light of distant galaxies, especially in redder wavelengths. We continue previous efforts to constrain the evolution and lifetimes of TP-AGB stars by modeling their underlying stellar populations. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical and near-infrared photometry taken of 12 fields of 10 nearby galaxies imaged via the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury and the near-infrared HST/SNAP follow-up campaign, we compare the model and observed TP-AGB luminosity functions as well as the number ratio of TP-AGB to red giant branch stars. We confirm the best-fitting mass-loss prescription, introduced by Rosenfield et al. 2014, in which two different wind regimes are active during the TP-AGB, significantly improves models of many galaxies that show evidence of recent star formation. This study extends previous efforts to constrain TP-AGB lifetimes to metallicities ranging -1.59 < [Fe/H] < -0.56 and initial TP-AGB masses up to ~ 4 Msun, which include TP-AGB stars that undergo hot-bottom burning.
  • To ensure progress in astronomy over the coming decades, the key questions are "what facilities will we build, and when?" Toward this end, the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) recently commissioned a study on future space-based options for UV and optical astronomy. The resulting study - "From Cosmic Birth to Living Earths" - concluded that a space telescope equipped with a 12-meter class primary mirror would make fundamental advances across virtually all of astrophysics, including finding and characterizing the atmospheres of dozens of Earth-like planets. This ambitious telescope concept is referred to as the High Definition Space Telescope (HDST). In a recent arXiv white paper, Elvis (2015) critiqued a subset of the findings of the AURA study, focusing on the detection and characterization of rocky exoplanets in the habitable zone. In this response, we clarify these issues to confirm that HDST would play a transformative role in the study of terrestrial worlds. Its capabilities for studying exoplanets would be truly unique, even in 2035, and would complement HDST's broad and deep range of exciting astrophysics.
  • We present a study of spatial variations in the metallicity of old red giant branch stars in the Andromeda galaxy. Photometric metallicity estimates are derived by interpolating isochrones for over seven million stars in the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey. This is the first systematic study of stellar metallicities over the inner 20 kpc of Andromeda's galactic disk. We see a clear metallicity gradient of $-0.020\pm0.004$ dex/kpc from $\sim4-20$ kpc assuming a constant RGB age. This metallicity gradient is derived after correcting for the effects of photometric bias and completeness and dust extinction and is quite insensitive to these effects. The unknown age gradient in M31's disk creates the dominant systematic uncertainty in our derived metallicity gradient. However, spectroscopic analyses of galaxies similar to M31 show that they typically have small age gradients that make this systematic error comparable to the 1$\sigma$ error on our metallicity gradient measurement. In addition to the metallicity gradient, we observe an asymmetric local enhancement in metallicity at radii of 3-6 kpc that appears to be associated with Andromeda's elongated bar. This same region also appears to have an enhanced stellar density and velocity dispersion.
  • We map the distribution of dust in M31 at 25pc resolution, using stellar photometry from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. We develop a new mapping technique that models the NIR color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of red giant branch (RGB) stars. The model CMDs combine an unreddened foreground of RGB stars with a reddened background population viewed through a log-normal column density distribution of dust. Fits to the model constrain the median extinction, the width of the extinction distribution, and the fraction of reddened stars. The resulting extinction map has >4 times better resolution than maps of dust emission, while providing a more direct measurement of the dust column. There is superb morphological agreement between the new map and maps of the extinction inferred from dust emission by Draine et al. 2014. However, the widely-used Draine & Li (2007) dust models overpredict the observed extinction by a factor of ~2.5, suggesting that M31's true dust mass is lower and that dust grains are significantly more emissive than assumed in Draine et al. (2014). The discrepancy we identify is consistent with similar findings in the Milky Way by the Planck Collaboration (2015), but has a more complex dependence on parameters from the Draine & Li (2007) dust models. We also show that the discrepancy with the Draine et al. (2014) map is lowest where the interstellar radiation field has a harder spectrum than average. We discuss possible improvements to the CMD dust mapping technique, and explore further applications.
  • We present a sample of 11 M31 Cepheids in stellar clusters, derived from the overlap of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) cluster catalog and the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) disk Cepheid catalog. After identifying the PS1 Cepheids in the HST catalog, we calibrate the PS1 mean magnitudes using the higher resolution HST photometry, revealing up to 1 magnitude offsets due to crowding effects in the ground-based catalog. We measure ages of the clusters by performing single stellar population fits to their color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) excluding their Cepheids. From these cluster age measurements, we derive an empirical period-age relation which agrees well with the existing literature values. By confirming this relation for M31 Cepheids, we justify its application in high-precision pointwise age estimation across M31.
  • Stationary density waves rotating at a constant pattern speed $\Omega_{\rm P}$ would produce age gradients across spiral arms. We test whether such age gradients are present in M81 by deriving the recent star formation histories (SFHs) of 20 regions around one of M81's grand-design spiral arms. For each region, we use resolved stellar populations to determine the SFH by modeling the observed color-magnitude diagram (CMD) constructed from archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) F435W and F606W imaging. Although we should be able to detect systematic time delays in our spatially-resolved SFHs, we find no evidence of star formation propagation across the spiral arm. Our data therefore provide no convincing evidence for a stationary density wave with a single pattern speed in M81, and instead favor the scenario of kinematic spiral patterns that are likely driven by tidal interactions with the companion galaxies M82 and NGC 3077.
  • We explore the ratio (C/M) of carbon-rich to oxygen-rich thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch(TP-AGB) stars in the disk of M31 using a combination of moderate-resolution optical spectroscopy from the Spectroscopic Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey and six-filter Hubble Space Telescope photometry from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey.Carbon stars were identified spectroscopically. Oxygen-rich M-stars were identifed using three different photometric definitions designed to mimic, and thus evaluate, selection techniques common in the literature. We calculate the C/M ratio as a function of galactocentric radius, present-day gas-phase oxygen abundance, stellar metallicity, age (via proxy defined as the ratio of TP-AGB stars to red giant branch, RGB, stars), and mean star formation rate over the last 400 Myr. We find statistically significant correlations between log(C/M) and all parameters. These trends are consistent across different M-star selection methods, though the fiducial values change. Of particular note is our observed relationship between log(C/M) and stellar metallicity, which is fully consistent with the trend seen across Local Group satellite galaxies. The fact that this trend persists in stellar populations with very different star formation histories indicates that the C/M ratio is governed by stellar properties alone.
  • We explore the assembly history of the M31 bulge within a projected major-axis radius of 180" (~680 pc) by studying its stellar populations in Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 and ACS observations. Colors formed by comparing near-ultraviolet vs. optical bands are found to become bluer with increasing major-axis radius, which is opposite to that predicted if the sole sources of near-ultraviolet light were old extreme horizontal branch stars with a negative radial gradient in metallicity. Spectral energy distribution fits require a metal-rich intermediate-age stellar population (300 Myr to 1 Gyr old, ~solar metallicity) in addition to the dominant old population. The radial gradients in age and metallicity of the old stellar population are consistent with those in previous works. For the intermediate-age population, we find an increase in age with radius and a mass fraction that increases up to 2% at 680 pc away from the center. We exclude contamination from the M31 disk and/or halo as the main origin for this population. Our results thus suggest that intermediate-age stars exist beyond the central 5" (19 pc) of M31 and contribute ~1% of the total stellar mass in the bulge. These stars could be related to the secular growth of the M31 bulge.
  • We measure the recent star formation history (SFH) across M31 using optical images taken with the \texit{Hubble Space Telescope} as part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT). We fit the color-magnitude diagrams in ~9000 regions that are ~100 pc $\times$ 100 pc in projected size, covering a 0.5 square degree area (~380 kpc$^2$, deprojected) in the NE quadrant of M31. We show that the SFHs vary significantly on these small spatial scales but that there are also coherent galaxy-wide fluctuations in the SFH back to ~500 Myr, most notably in M31's 10-kpc star-forming ring. We find that the 10-kpc ring is at least 400 Myr old, showing ongoing star formation over the past ~500 Myr. This indicates the presence of molecular gas in the ring over at least 2 dynamical times at this radius. We also find that the ring's position is constant throughout this time, and is stationary at the level of 1 km/s, although there is evidence for broadening of the ring due to diffusion of stars into the disk. Based on existing models of M31's ring features, the lack of evolution in the ring's position makes a purely collisional ring origin highly unlikely. We find that the global SFR has been fairly constant over the last ~500 Myr, though it does show a small increase at 50 Myr that is 1.3 times the average SFR over the past 100 Myr. During the last ~500 Myr, ~60% of all SF occurs in the 10-kpc ring. Finally, we find that in the past 100 Myr, the average SFR over the PHAT survey area is $0.28\pm0.03$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ with an average deprojected intensity of $7.3 \times 10^{-4}$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$, which yields a total SFR of ~0.7 M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ when extrapolated to the entire area of M31's disk. This SFR is consistent with measurements from broadband estimates. [abridged]
  • We have identified a major global enhancement of star formation in the inner M31 disk that occurred between 2-4 Gyr ago, producing $\sim$60% of the stellar mass formed in the past 5 Gyr. The presence of this episode in the inner disk was discovered by modeling the optical resolved star color-magnitude diagrams of low extinction regions in the main disk of M31 (3$<$R$<$20 kpc) as part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. This measurement confirms and extends recent measurements of a widespread star formation enhancement of similar age in the outer disk, suggesting that this burst was both massive and global. Following the galaxy-wide burst, the star formation rate of M31 has significantly declined. We briefly discuss possible causes for these features of the M31 evolutionary history, including interactions with M32, M33 and/or a merger.
  • We explore the quenching of low-mass galaxies (10^4 < Mstar < 10^8 Msun) as a function of lookback time using the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies. The SFHs were derived from analyzing color-magnitude diagrams of resolved stellar populations in archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. We find: (1) Lower mass galaxies quench earlier than higher mass galaxies; (2) Inside of virial radius there is no correlation between a satellite's current proximity to a massive host and its quenching epoch; (3) There are hints of systematic differences in quenching times of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites, although the sample sample size and uncertainties in the SFHs of M31 dwarfs prohibit definitive conclusions. Combined with literature results, we qualitatively consider the redshift evolution (z=0-1) of the quenched galaxy fraction over ~7 dex in stellar mass (10^4 < Mstar < 10^11.5 Msun). The quenched fraction of all galaxies generally increases toward the present, with both the lowest and highest mass systems exhibiting the largest quenched fractions at all redshifts. In contrast, galaxies between Mstar ~ 10^8-10^10 Msun have the lowest quenched fractions. We suggest that such intermediate-mass galaxies are the least efficient at quenching. Finally, we compare our quenching times with predictions for infall times of low-mass galaxies associated with the MW. We find that some of the lowest-mass satellites (e.g., CVn II, Leo IV) may have been quenched before infall while higher mass satellites (e.g., Leo I, Fornax) typically quench ~1-4 Gyr after infall.
  • We have undertaken the largest systematic study of the high-mass stellar initial mass function (IMF) to date using the optical color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of 85 resolved, young (4 Myr < t < 25 Myr), intermediate mass star clusters (10^3-10^4 Msun), observed as part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) program. We fit each cluster's CMD to measure its mass function (MF) slope for stars >2 Msun. For the ensemble of clusters, the distribution of stellar MF slopes is best described by $\Gamma=+1.45^{+0.03}_{-0.06}$ with a very small intrinsic scatter. The data also imply no significant dependencies of the MF slope on cluster age, mass, and size, providing direct observational evidence that the measured MF represents the IMF. This analysis implies that the high-mass IMF slope in M31 clusters is universal with a slope ($\Gamma=+1.45^{+0.03}_{-0.06}$) that is steeper than the canonical Kroupa (+1.30) and Salpeter (+1.35) values. Using our inference model on select Milky Way (MW) and LMC high-mass IMF studies from the literature, we find $\Gamma_{\rm MW} \sim+1.15\pm0.1$ and $\Gamma_{\rm LMC} \sim+1.3\pm0.1$, both with intrinsic scatter of ~0.3-0.4 dex. Thus, while the high-mass IMF in the Local Group may be universal, systematics in literature IMF studies preclude any definitive conclusions; homogenous investigations of the high-mass IMF in the local universe are needed to overcome this limitation. Consequently, the present study represents the most robust measurement of the high-mass IMF slope to date. We have grafted the M31 high-mass IMF slope onto widely used sub-solar mass Kroupa and Chabrier IMFs and show that commonly used UV- and Halpha-based star formation rates should be increased by a factor of ~1.3-1.5 and the number of stars with masses >8 Msun are ~25% fewer than expected for a Salpeter/Kroupa IMF. [abridged]
  • The stellar kinematics of galactic disks are key to constraining disk formation and evolution processes. In this paper, for the first time, we measure the stellar age-velocity dispersion correlation in the inner 20 kpc (3.5 disk scale lengths) of M31 and show that it is dramatically different from that in the Milky Way. We use optical Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys photometry of 5800 individual stars from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey and Keck/DEIMOS radial velocity measurements of the same stars from the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey. We show that the average line-of-sight velocity dispersion is a steadily increasing function of stellar age exterior to R=10 kpc, increasing from 30 km/s for the young upper main sequence stars to 90 km/s for the old red giant branch stars. This monotonic increase implies that a continuous or recurring process contributed to the evolution of the disk. Both the slope and normalization of the dispersion vs. age relation are significantly larger than in the Milky Way, allowing for the possibility that the disk of M31 has had a more violent history than the disk of the Milky Way, more in line with cosmological predictions. We also find evidence for an inhomogeneous distribution of stars from a second kinematical component in addition to the dominant disk component. One of the largest and hottest high-dispersion patches is present in all age bins, and may be the signature of the end of the long bar.