• We discuss how we can detect and identify counterparts of fast radio bursts (FRBs) in future optical follow up observations of FRBs if real-time alert of FRBs becomes available. We consider kilonovae as candidates of FRB optical counterparts, as expected in the case that FRBs originate from mergers of double neutron star binaries. Although theoretical predictions on luminosities of kilonovae are still highly uncertain, recent models suggest that kilonovae can be detected at redshifts up to z $\sim$ 0.3 within the range of the uncertainties. We expect $\sim$ 1--5 unrelated supernovae (SNe) down to a similar variability magnitude in 5 days interval within the typical error radius of a FRB. We show that, however, a kilonova can be distinguished from these SNe by its rapid decay and/or color evolution, making it possible to verify the existence of a kilonova associated with a FRB. We also discuss the case that SNe Ia are FRB optical counterparts, as it might be if FRBs originate from double white dwarf binaries. Verification of this scenario is also possible, since the chance probability of finding a SNe Ia having consistent explosion time with that of a FRB within the FRB error region is small (typically $\lesssim$ 0.01).
  • We present measurements of the rates of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae derived from the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS). We carried out repeat deep imaging observations with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope, and detected 1040 variable objects over 0.918 deg$^2$ in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Field. From the imaging observations, light curves in the observed $i'$-band are constructed for all objects, and we fit the observed light curves with template light curves. Out of the 1040 variable objects detected by the SXDS, 39 objects over the redshift range $0.2 < z < 1.4$ are classified as Type Ia supernovae using the light curves. These are among the most distant SN Ia rate measurements to date. We find that the Type Ia supernova rate increase up to $z \sim 0.8$ and may then flatten at higher redshift. The rates can be fitted by a simple power law, $r_V(z)=r_0(1+z)^\alpha$ with $r_0=0.20^{+0.52}_{-0.16}$(stat.)$^{+0.26}_{-0.07}$(syst.)$\times 10^{-4} {\rm yr}^{-1}{\rm Mpc}^{-3}$, and $\alpha=2.04^{+1.84}_{-1.96}$(stat.)$^{+2.11}_{-0.86}$(syst.).