• We present well-sampled optical observations of the bright Type Ia supernova (SN~Ia) SN 2011fe in M101. Our data, starting from $\sim16$ days before maximum light and extending to $\sim463$ days after maximum, provide an unprecedented time series of spectra and photometry for a normal SN~Ia. Fitting the early-time rising light curve, we find that the luminosity evolution of SN 2011fe follows a $t^n$ law, with the index $n$ being close to 2.0 in the $VRI$ bands but slightly larger in the $U$ and $B$ bands. Combining the published ultraviolet (UV) and near-infrared (NIR) photometry, we derive the contribution of UV/NIR emission relative to the optical. SN 2011fe is found to have stronger UV emission and reaches its UV peak a few days earlier than other SNe~Ia with similar $\Delta m_{15}(B)$, suggestive of less trapping of high-energy photons in the ejecta. Moreover, the $U$-band light curve shows a notably faster decline at late phases ($t\approx 100$--300 days), which also suggests that the ejecta may be relatively transparent to UV photons. These results favor the notion that SN 2011fe might have a progenitor system with relatively lower metallicity. On the other hand, the early-phase spectra exhibit prominent high-velocity features (HVFs) of O~I $\lambda$7773 and the Ca~II~NIR triplet, but only barely detectable in Si~II~6355. This difference can be caused either by an ionization/temperature effect or an abundance enhancement scenario for the formation of HVFs; it suggests that the photospheric temperature of SN 2011fe is intrinsically low, perhaps owing to incomplete burning during the explosion of the white dwarf.
  • Photometric and spectroscopic observations of a slowly declining, luminous Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) SN 2011hr in the starburst galaxy NGC 2691 are presented. SN 2011hr is found to peak at $M_{B}=-19.84 \pm 0.40\,\rm{mag}$, with a post-maximum decline rate $\Delta$m$_{15}$(B) = 0.92 $\pm$ 0.03\,$\rm{mag}$. From the maximum-light bolometric luminosity, $L=(2.30 \pm 0.90) \times 10^{43}\,\rm{erg\,s^{-1}}$, we estimate the mass of synthesized \Nifs\ in SN 2011hr to be $M(\rm{^{56}Ni})=1.11 \pm 0.43\,M_{\sun}$. SN 2011hr appears more luminous than SN 1991T at around maximum light, and the absorption features from its intermediate-mass elements (IMEs) are noticeably weaker than the latter at similar phases. Spectral modeling suggests that SN 2011hr has the IMEs of $\sim$\,0.07 M$_{\sun}$ in the outer ejecta, which is much lower than the typical value of normal SNe Ia (i.e., 0.3 -- 0.4 M$_{\sun}$) and is also lower than the value of SN 1991T (i.e., $\sim$\,0.18 M$_{\sun}$). These results indicate that SN 2011hr may arise from a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf progenitor that experienced a more efficient burning process in the explosion. Nevertheless, it is still possible that SN 2011hr may serve as a transitional object connecting the SN 1991T-like SNe Ia with the superluminous subclass like SN 2007if given that the latter also shows very weak IMEs at all phases.
  • In this paper, we report the detections of stellar variabilities from the first 2-year observations of sky area of about 1300 square degrees from the Tsinghua University-NAOC Transient Survey (TNTS). A total of 1237 variable stars (including 299 new ones) were detected with brightness < 18.0 mag and magnitude variation >= 0.1 mag on a timescale from a few hours to few hundred days. Among such detections, we tentatively identified 661 RR Lyrae stars, 431 binaries, 72 Semiregular pulsators, 29 Mira stars, 11 slow irregular variables, 11 RS Canum Venaticorum stars, 7 Gamma Doradus stars, 5 long period variables, 3 W Virginis stars, 3 Delta Scuti stars, 2 Anomalous Cepheids, 1 Cepheid, and 1 nove-like star based on their time-series variability index Js and their phased diagrams. Moreover, we found that 14 RR Lyrae stars show the Blazhko effect and 67 contact eclipsing binaries exhibit the O'Connell effect. Since the period and amplitude of light variations of RR Lyrae variables depend on their chemical compositions, their photometric observations can be used to investigate distribution of metallicity along the direction perpendicular to the Galactic disk. We find that the metallicity of RR Lyrae stars shows large scatter at regions closer to the Galactic plane (e.g., -3.0 < [Fe/H] < 0) but tends to converge at [Fe/H]~ -1.7 at larger Galactic latitudes. This variation may be related to that the RRAB Lyrae stars in the Galactic halo come from globular clusters with different metallicity and vertical distances, i.e. OoI and OoII populations, favoring for the dual-halo model.
  • We present extensive ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared observations of the type IIP supernova (SN IIP) 2013ej in the nearby spiral galaxy M74. The multicolor light curves, spanning from $\sim$ 8--185 days after explosion, show that it has a higher peak luminosity (i.e., M$_{V}$ $\sim$$-$17.83 mag at maximum light), a faster post-peak decline, and a shorter plateau phase (i.e., $\sim$ 50 days) compared to the normal type IIP SN 1999em. The mass of $^{56}$Ni is estimated as 0.02$\pm$0.01 M$_{\odot}$ from the radioactive tail of the bolometric light curve. The spectral evolution of SN 2013ej is similar to that of SN 2004et and SN 2007od, but shows a larger expansion velocity (i.e., $v_{Fe II} \sim$ 4600 km s$^{-1}$ at t $\sim$ 50 days) and broader line profiles. In the nebular phase, the emission of H$\alpha$ line displays a double-peak structure, perhaps due to the asymmetric distribution of $^{56}$Ni produced in the explosion. With the constraints from the main observables such as bolometric light curve, expansion velocity and photospheric temperature of SN 2013ej, we performed hydrodynamical simulations of the explosion parameters, yielding the total explosion energy as $\sim$0.7$\times$ 10$^{51}$ erg, the radius of the progenitor as $\sim$600 R$_{\odot}$, and the ejected mass as $\sim$10.6 M$_{\odot}$. These results suggest that SN 2013ej likely arose from a red supergiant with a mass of 12--13 M$_{\odot}$ immediately before the explosion.
  • We present extensive optical observations of the normal Type Ic supernova (SN) 2007gr, spanning from about one week before maximum light to more than one year thereafter. The optical light and color curves of SN 2007gr are very similar to those of the broad-lined Type Ic SN 2002ap, but the spectra show remarkable differences. The optical spectra of SN 2007gr are characterized by unusually narrow lines, prominent carbon lines, and slow evolution of the line velocity after maximum light. The earliest spectrum (taken at t=-8 days) shows a possible signature of helium (He~I 5876 at a velocity of ~19,000 km s{-1}). Moreover, the larger intensity ratio of the [O I] 6300 and 6364 lines inferred from the early nebular spectra implies a lower opacity of the ejecta shortly after the explosion. These results indicate that SN 2007gr perhaps underwent a less energetic explosion of a smaller-mass Wolf-Rayet star (~ 8--9 Msun) in a binary system, as favored by an analysis of the progenitor environment through pre-explosion and post-explosion Hubble Space Telescope images. In the nebular spectra, asymmetric double-peaked profiles can be seen in the [O~I] 6300 and Mg~I] 4571 lines. We suggest that the two peaks are contributed by the blueshifted and rest-frame components. The similarity in velocity structure and the different evolution of the strength of the two components favor an aspherical explosion with the ejecta distributed in a torus or disk-like geometry, but inside the ejecta the O and Mg have different distributions.
  • We present optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of the Type Ibn (SN 2006jc-like) supernova iPTF13beo. Detected by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory ~3 hours after the estimated first light, iPTF13beo is the youngest and the most distant (~430 Mpc) Type Ibn event ever observed. The iPTF13beo light curve is consistent with light curves of other Type Ibn SNe and with light curves of fast Type Ic events, but with a slightly faster rise-time of two days. In addition, the iPTF13beo R-band light curve exhibits a double-peak structure separated by ~9 days, not observed before in any Type Ibn SN. A low-resolution spectrum taken during the iPTF13beo rising stage is featureless, while a late-time spectrum obtained during the declining stage exhibits narrow and intermediate-width He I and Si II features with FWHM ~ 2000-5000 km/s and is remarkably similar to the prototypical SN Ibn 2006jc spectrum. We suggest that our observations support a model of a massive star exploding in a dense He-rich circumstellar medium (CSM). A shock breakout in a CSM model requires an eruption releasing a total mass of ~0.1 Msun over a time scale of couple of weeks prior to the SN explosion.
  • Extensive optical and ultraviolet (UV) observations of the type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2012fr are presented in this paper. It has a relatively high luminosity, with an absolute $B$-band peak magnitude of about $-19.5$ mag and a smaller post-maximum decline rate than normal SNe Ia [e.g., $\Delta m _{15}$($B$) $= 0.85 \pm 0.05$ mag]. Based on the UV and optical light curves, we derived that a $^{56}$Ni mass of about 0.88 solar masses was synthesized in the explosion. The earlier spectra are characterized by noticeable high-velocity features of \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 and \ion{Ca}{2} with velocities in the range of $\sim22,000$--$25,000$ km s$^{-1}$. At around the maximum light, these spectral features are dominated by the photospheric components which are noticeably narrower than normal SNe Ia. The post-maximum velocity of the photosphere remains almost constant at $\sim$12,000 km s$^{-1}$ for about one month, reminiscent of the behavior of some luminous SNe Ia like SN 1991T. We propose that SN 2012fr may represent a subset of the SN 1991T-like SNe Ia viewed in a direction with a clumpy or shell-like structure of ejecta, in terms of a significant level of polarization reported in Maund et al. (2013).
  • We present extensive optical observations of a Type IIn supernova (SN) 2010jl for the first 1.5 years after the discovery. The UBVRI light curves demonstrated an interesting two-stage evolution during the nebular phase, which almost flatten out after about 90 days from the optical maximum. SN 2010jl has one of the highest intrinsic H_alpha luminosity ever recorded for a SN IIn, especially at late phase, suggesting a strong interaction of SN ejecta with the dense circumstellar material (CSM) ejected by the progenitor. This is also indicated by the remarkably strong Balmer lines persisting in the optical spectra. One interesting spectral evolution about SN 2010jl is the appearance of asymmetry of the Balmer lines. These lines can be well decomposed into a narrow component and an intermediate-width component. The intermediate-width component showed a steady increase in both strength and blueshift with time until t ~ 400 days after maximum, but it became less blueshifted at t ~ 500 days when the line profile appeared relatively symmetric again. Owing to that a pure reddening effect will lead to a sudden decline of the light curves and a progressive blueshift of the spectral lines, we therefore propose that the asymmetric profiles of H lines seen in SN 2010jl is unlikely due to the extinction by newly formed dust inside the ejecta, contrary to the explanation by some early studies. Based on a simple CSM-interaction model, we speculate that the progenitor of SN 2010jl may suffer a gigantic mass loss (~ 30-50 M_sun) in a few decades before explosion. Considering a slow moving stellar wind (e.g., ~ 28 km/s) inferred for the preexisting, dense CSM shell and the extremely high mass-loss rate (1-2 M_sun per yr), we suggest that the progenitor of SN 2010jl might have experienced a red supergiant stage and explode finally as a post-red supergiant star with an initial mass above 30-40 M_sun.