• We study the critical behavior of Bose-Einstein condensation in the second band of a bipartite optical square lattice in a renormalization group framework at one-loop order. Within our field theoretical representation of the system, we approximate the system as a two-component Bose gas in three dimensions. We demonstrate that the system is in a different universality class than the previously studied condensation in a frustrated triangular lattice due to an additional Umklapp scattering term, which stabilizes the chiral superfluid order at low temperatures. We derive the renormalization group flow of the system and show that this order persists in the low energy limit. Furthermore, the renormalization flow suggests that the phase transition from the thermal phase to the chiral superfluid state is first order.
  • We investigate the quantum phases of mixed-dimensional cold atom mixtures. In particular, we consider a mixture of a Fermi gas in a two-dimensional lattice, interacting with a bulk Fermi gas or a Bose-Einstein condensate in a three-dimensional lattice. The effective interaction of the two-dimensional system mediated by the bulk system is determined. We perform a functional renormalization group analysis, and demonstrate that by tuning the properties of the bulk system, a subtle competition of several superconducting orders can be controlled among $s$-wave, $p$-wave, $d_{x^2-y^2}$-wave, and $g_{xy(x^2-y^2)}$-wave pairing symmetries. Other instabilities such as a charge-density wave order are also demonstrated to occur. In particular, we find that the critical temperature of the $d$-wave pairing induced by the next-nearest-neighbor interactions can be an order of magnitude larger than that of the same pairing induced by doping in the simple Hubbard model. We expect that by combining the nearest-neighbor interaction with the next-nearest-neighbor hopping (known to enhance $d$-wave pairing), an even higher critical temperature may be achieved.
  • We employ low-frequency Raman spectroscopy to study the nearly commensurate (NC) to commensurate (C) charge density wave (CDW) transition in 1T-TaS2 ultrathin flakes protected from oxidation. We identify new modes originating from C phase CDW phonons that are distinct from those seen in bulk 1T-TaS2. We attribute these to CDW modes from the surface layers. By monitoring individual modes with temperature, we find that surfaces undergo a separate, low-hysteresis NC-C phase transition that is decoupled from the transition in the bulk layers. This indicates the activation of a secondary phase nucleation process in the limit of weak interlayer interaction, which can be understood from energy considerations.
  • We briefly summarize the current status of driven solid-state and cold-atom systems, and introduce articles compiled in the Focus Section in Zeitschrift f\"ur Naturforschung A, Volume 71, Issue 10 (2016)
  • Using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, we demonstrate an unambiguous 1-D system that surprisingly undergoes a CDW instability on a metallic substrate. Our ability to directly and quantitatively measure the structural distortion of this system provides an accurate reference for comparison with first principles theory. In comparison to previously proposed physical mechanisms, we attribute this particular 1-D CDW instability to a ferromagnetic state. We show that though the linear arrayed dimers are not electronically isolated, they are magnetically independent, and hence can potentially serve as a binary spin-memory system.