• A significant and growing portion of systematic error on a number of fundamental parameters in astrophysics and cosmology is due to uncertainties from absolute photometric and flux standards. A path toward achieving major reduction in such uncertainties may be provided by satellite-mounted light sources, resulting in improvement in the ability to precisely characterize atmospheric extinction, and thus helping to usher in the coming generation of precision results in astronomy. Using a campaign of observations of the 532 nm pulsed laser aboard the CALIPSO satellite, collected using a portable network of cameras and photodiodes, we obtain initial measurements of atmospheric extinction, which can apparently be greatly improved by further data of this type. For a future satellite-mounted precision light source, a high-altitude balloon platform under development (together with colleagues) can provide testing as well as observational data for calibration of atmospheric uncertainties.
  • A significant and growing portion of systematic error on a number of fundamental parameters in astrophysics and cosmology is due to uncertainties from absolute photometric and flux standards. A path toward achieving major reduction in such uncertainties may be provided by satellite-mounted light sources, resulting in improvement in the ability to precisely characterize atmospheric extinction, and thus helping to usher in the coming generation of precision results in astronomy. Toward this end, we have performed a campaign of observations of the 532 nm pulsed laser aboard the CALIPSO satellite, using a portable network of cameras and photodiodes, to precisely measure atmospheric extinction.
  • (abridged) We examine the spatial and temporal stability of the HST ACS Wide Field Camera (WFC) point spread function (PSF) using the two square degree COSMOS survey. We show that stochastic aliasing of the PSF necessarily occurs during `drizzling'. This aliasing is maximal if the output pixel scale is equal to the input pixel scale of 0.05''. We show that this source of PSF variation can be significantly reduced by choosing a Gaussian drizzle kernel and by setting the output pixel size to 0.03''. We show that the PSF is temporally unstable, most likely due to thermal fluctuations in the telescope's focus. We find that the primary manifestation of this thermal drift in COSMOS images is an overall slow periodic focus change. Using a modified version of TinyTim, we create undistorted stars in a 30x30 grid across the ACS WFC CCDs. These PSF models are created for telescope focus values in the range -10 microns to +5 microns, thus spanning the allowed range of telescope focus values. We then use the approximately ten well measured stars in each COSMOS field to pick the best-fit focus value for each field. The TinyTim model stars are then used to perform PSF corrections for weak lensing allowing systematics due to incorrectly modeled PSFs to be greatly reduced. We have made the software for PSF modeling using our modified version of TinyTim available to the astronomical community. We show the effects of Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) degradation, which distorts the object in the readout direction, mimicking a weak lensing signal. We derive a parametric correction for the effect of CTE on the shapes of objects in the COSMOS field as a function of observation date, position within the ACS WFC field, and object flux.
  • We present a three dimensional cosmic shear analysis of the Hubble Space Telescope COSMOS survey, the largest ever optical imaging program performed in space. We have measured the shapes of galaxies for the tell-tale distortions caused by weak gravitational lensing, and traced the growth of that signal as a function of redshift. Using both 2D and 3D analyses, we measure cosmological parameters Omega_m, the density of matter in the universe, and sigma_8, the normalization of the matter power spectrum. The introduction of redshift information tightens the constraints by a factor of three, and also reduces the relative sampling (or "cosmic") variance compared to recent surveys that may be larger but are only two dimensional. From the 3D analysis, we find sigma_8*(Omega_m/0.3)^0.44=0.866+^0.085_-0.068 at 68% confidence limits, including both statistical and potential systematic sources of error in the total budget. Indeed, the absolute calibration of shear measurement methods is now the dominant source of uncertainty. Assuming instead a baseline cosmology to fix the geometry of the universe, we have measured the growth of structure on both linear and non-linear physical scales. Our results thus demonstrate a proof of concept for tomographic analysis techniques that have been proposed for future weak lensing surveys by a dedicated wide-field telescope in space.
  • We propose a tunable laser-based satellite-mounted spectrophotometric and absolute flux calibration system, to be utilized by ground- and space-based telescopes. As spectrophotometric calibration may play a significant role in the accuracy of photometric redshift measurement, and photometric redshift accuracy is important for measuring dark energy using SNIa, weak gravitational lensing, and baryon oscillations, a method for reducing such uncertainties is needed. We propose to improve spectrophotometric calibration, currently obtained using standard stars, by placing a tunable laser and a wide-angle light source on a satellite by early next decade (perhaps included in the upgrade to the GPS satellite network) to improve absolute flux calibration and relative spectrophotometric calibration across the visible and near-infrared spectrum. As well as fundamental astrophysical applications, the system proposed here potentially has broad utility for defense and national security applications such as ground target illumination and space communication.
  • The ability to accurately measure the shapes of faint objects in images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys(ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) depends upon detailed knowledge of the Point Spread Function (PSF). We show that thermal fluctuations cause the PSF of the ACS Wide Field Camera (WFC) to vary over time. We describe a modified version of the TinyTim PSF modeling software to create artificial grids of stars across the ACS field of view at a range of telescope focus values. These models closely resemble the stars in real ACS images. Using ~10 bright stars in a real image, we have been able to measure HST's apparent focus at the time of the exposure. TinyTim can then be used to model the PSF at any position on the ACS field of view. This obviates the need for images of dense stellar fields at different focus values, or interpolation between the few observed stars. We show that residual differences between our TinyTim models and real data are likely due to the effects of Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) degradation. Furthermore, we discuss stochastic noise that is added to the shape of point sources when distortion is removed, and we present Multidrizzle parameters that are optimal for weak lensing science. Specifically, we find that reducing the Multidrizzle output pixel scale and choosing a Gaussian kernel significantly stabilizes the resulting PSF after image combination, while still eliminating cosmic rays/bad pixels, and correcting the large geometric distortion in the ACS. We discuss future plans, which include more detailed study of the effects of CTE degradation on object shapes and releasing our TinyTim models to the astronomical community.
  • We report on the initial measurements of the angle gamma and the sum of angles 2 beta + gamma of the Unitarity Triangle. When compared with indirect information on the value of gamma from other measurements of CKM parameters, the measurement of these angles will provide a precise test of Standard Model predictions, as statistics increase. There are several methods for directly measuring gamma and 2 beta + gamma. We report on the status of each of these techniques, and the resulting constraints on the values of these angles.
  • Recently, it was proposed to use measurements of Bd(t) -> D(*)+ D(*)- and Bd -> Ds(*)+ D(*)- decays to measure the CP phase gamma. In this paper, we present the extraction of gamma using this method. We find that gamma is favored to lie in one of the ranges [19.4o - 80.6o] (+ 0o or 180o), [120o - 147o] (+ 0o or 180o), or [160o - 174o] (+ 0o or 180o) at 68% confidence level (the (+ 0o or 180o) represents an additional ambiguity for each range). These constraints come principally from the vector-vector final states; the vector-pseudoscalar decays improve the results only slightly. Although, with present data, the constraints disappear for larger confidence levels, this study does demonstrate the feasibility of the method. Strong constraints on gamma can be obtained with more data.
  • We study the accuracy with which weak lensing measurements could be made from a future space-based survey, predicting the subsequent precisions of 3-dimensional dark matter maps, projected 2-dimensional dark matter maps, and mass-selected cluster catalogues. As a baseline, we use the instrumental specifications of the Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) satellite. We first compute its sensitivity to weak lensing shear as a function of survey depth. Our predictions are based on detailed image simulations created using `shapelets', a complete and orthogonal parameterization of galaxy morphologies. We incorporate a realistic redshift distribution of source galaxies, and calculate the average precision of photometric redshift recovery using the SNAP filter set to be Delta z=0.034. The high density of background galaxies resolved in a wide space-based survey allows projected dark matter maps with a rms sensitivity of 3% shear in 1 square arcminute cells. This will be further improved using a proposed deep space-based survey, which will be able to detect isolated clusters using a 3D lensing inversion techniques with a 1 sigma mass sensitivity of approximately 10^13 solar masses at z~0.25. Weak lensing measurements from space will thus be able to capture non-Gaussian features arising from gravitational instability and map out dark matter in the universe with unprecedented resolution.
  • Weak gravitational lensing provides a unique method to directly map the dark matter in the universe and measure cosmological parameters. Current weak lensing surveys are limited by the atmospheric seeing from the ground and by the small field of view of existing space telescopes. We study how a future wide-field space telescope can measure the lensing power spectrum and skewness, and set constraints on cosmological parameters. The lensing sensitivity was calculated using detailed image simulations and instrumental specifications studied in earlier papers in this series. For instance, the planned SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will be able to measure the matter density parameter Omega_m and the dark energy equation of state parameter w with precisions comparable and nearly orthogonal to those derived with SNAP from supernovae. The constraints degrade by a factor of about 2 if redshift tomography is not used, but are little affected if the skewness only is dropped. We also study how the constraints on these parameters depend upon the survey geometry and define an optimal observing strategy.