• We explore how the group environment may affect the evolution of star-forming galaxies. We select 1197 Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) groups at $0.05\leq z \leq 0.2$ and analyze the projected phase space (PPS) diagram, i.e. the galaxy velocity as a function of projected group-centric radius, as a local environmental metric in the low-mass halo regime $10^{12}\leq (M_{200}/M_{\odot})< 10^{14}$. We study the properties of star-forming group galaxies, exploring the correlation of star formation rate (SFR) with radial distance and stellar mass. We find that the fraction of star-forming group members is higher in the PPS regions dominated by recently accreted galaxies, whereas passive galaxies dominate the virialized regions. We observe a small decline in specific SFR of star-forming galaxies towards the group center by a factor $\sim 1.2$ with respect to field galaxies. Similar to cluster studies, we conclude for low-mass halos that star-forming group galaxies represent an infalling population from the field to the halo and show suppressed star formation.
  • There are multiple ways in which to select post-starburst galaxies in the literature. In this work, we present a study into how two well-used selection techniques have consequences on observable post-starburst galaxy parameters, such as colour, morphology and environment and how this affects interpretations of their role in the galaxy duty cycle. We identify a master sample of H$\delta$ strong (EW$_{H\delta}$ > 3\AA) post-starburst galaxies from the value-added catalogue in the 7th data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR7) over a redshift range 0.01 < $z$ < 0.1. From this sample we select two E+A subsets, both having a very little [OII] emission (EW$_{[OII]}$ $> -2.5$\AA) but one having an additional cut on EW$_{H\alpha}$ ($> -3$\AA). We examine the differences in observables and AGN fractions to see what effect the H$\alpha$ cut has on the properties of post-starburst galaxies and what these differing samples can tell us about the duty cycle of post-starburst galaxies. We find that H$\delta$ strong galaxies peak in the `blue cloud', E+As in the `green valley' and pure E+As in the `red sequence'. We also find that pure E+As have a more early-type morphology and a higher fraction in denser environments compared with the H$\delta$ strong and E+A galaxies. These results suggest that there is an evolutionary sequence in the post-starburst phase from blue disky galaxies with residual star formation to passive red early-types.
  • We present the Large Area Radio Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Survey (LARGESS), a spectroscopic catalogue of radio sources designed to include the full range of radio AGN populations out to redshift z = 0.8. The catalogue covers roughly 800 square degrees of sky, and provides optical identifications for 19,179 radio sources from the 1.4 GHz Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST) survey down to an optical magnitude limit of i_mod < 20.5 in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images. Both galaxies and point-like objects are included, and no colour cuts are applied. In collaboration with the WiggleZ and Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) spectroscopic survey teams, we have obtained new spectra for over 5,000 objects in the LARGESS sample. Combining these new spectra with data from earlier surveys provides spectroscopic data for 12,329 radio sources in the survey area, of which 10,856 have reliable redshifts. 85% of the LARGESS spectroscopic sample are radio AGN (median redshift z = 0.44), and 15% are nearby star-forming galaxies (median z = 0.08). Low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) comprise the majority (83%) of LARGESS radio AGN at z < 0.8, with 12% being high-excitation radio galaxies (HERGs) and 5% radio-loud QSOs. Unlike the more homogeneous LERG and QSO sub-populations, HERGs are a heterogeneous class of objects with relatively blue optical colours and a wide dispersion in mid-infrared colours. This is consistent with a picture in which most HERGs are hosted by galaxies with recent or ongoing star formation as well as a classical accretion disk.
  • The Shapley Supercluster Survey is a multi-wavelength survey covering an area of ~23 deg^2 (~260 Mpc^2 at z=0.048) around the supercluster core, including nine Abell and two poor clusters, having redshifts in the range 0.045-0.050. The survey aims to investigate the role of the cluster-scale mass assembly on the evolution of galaxies, mapping the effects of the environment from the cores of the clusters to their outskirts and along the filaments. The optical (ugri) imaging acquired with OmegaCAM on the VLT Survey Telescope is essential to achieve the project goals providing accurate multi-band photometry for the galaxy population down to m*+6. We describe the methodology adopted to construct the optical catalogues and to separate extended and point-like sources. The catalogues reach average 5sigma limiting magnitudes within a 3\arcsec diameter aperture of ugri=[24.4,24.6,24.1,23.3] and are 93% complete down to ugri=[23.8,23.8,23.5,22.0] mag, corresponding to ~m*_r+8.5. The data are highly uniform in terms of observing conditions and all acquired with seeing less than 1.1 arcsec full width at half-maximum. The median seeing in r-band is 0.6 arcsec, corresponding to 0.56 kpc h^{-1}_{70} at z=0.048. While the observations in the u, g and r bands are still ongoing, the i-band observations have been completed, and we present the i-band catalogue over the whole survey area. The latter is released and it will be regularly updated, through the use of the Virtual Observatory tools. This includes 734,319 sources down to i=22.0 mag and it is the first optical homogeneous catalogue at such a depth, covering the central region of the Shapley supercluster.
  • We examine the properties of galaxies in the Galaxies and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey located in voids with radii $>10~h^{-1}$ Mpc. Utilising the GAMA equatorial survey, 592 void galaxies are identified out to z~0.1 brighter than $M_{r} = -18.4$, our magnitude completeness limit. Using the $W_{\rm{H\alpha}}$ vs. [NII]/H$\alpha$ (WHAN) line strength diagnostic diagram, we classify their spectra as star forming, AGN, or dominated by old stellar populations. For objects more massive than $5\times10^{9}$ M$_{\odot}$, we identify a sample of 26 void galaxies with old stellar populations classed as passive and retired galaxies in the WHAN diagnostic diagram, else they lack any emission lines in their spectra. When matched to WISE mid-IR photometry, these passive and retired galaxies exhibit a range of mid-IR colour, with a number of void galaxies exhibiting [4.6]-[12] colours inconsistent with completely quenched stellar populations, with a similar spread in colour seen for a randomly drawn non-void comparison sample. We hypothesise that a number of these galaxies host obscured star formation, else they are star forming outside of their central regions targeted for single fibre spectroscopy. When matched to a randomly drawn sample of non-void galaxies, the void and non-void galaxies exhibit similar properties in terms of optical and mid-IR colour, morphology, and star formation activity, suggesting comparable mass assembly and quenching histories. A trend in mid-IR [4.6]-[12] colour is seen, such that both void and non-void galaxies with quenched/passive colours <1.5 typically have masses higher than $10^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$, where internally driven processes play an increasingly important role in galaxy evolution.
  • We present an overview of a multi-wavelength survey of the Shapley supercluster (SSC; z~0.05) covering a contiguous area of 260 h^-2_70 Mpc^2 including the supercluster core. The project main aim is to quantify the influence of cluster-scale mass assembly on galaxy evolution in one of the most massive structures in the local Universe. The Shapley supercluster survey (ShaSS) includes nine Abell clusters (A3552, A3554, A3556, A3558, A3559, A3560, A3562, AS0724, AS0726) and two poor clusters (SC1327- 312, SC1329-313) showing evidence of cluster-cluster interactions. Optical (ugri) and near-infrared (K) imaging acquired with VST and VISTA allow us to study the galaxy population down to m*+6 at the supercluster redshift. A dedicated spectroscopic survey with AAOmega on the Anglo-Australian Telescope provides a magnitude-limited sample of supercluster members with 80% completeness at ~m*+3. We derive the galaxy density across the whole area, demonstrating that all structures within this area are embedded in a single network of clusters, groups and filaments. The stellar mass density in the core of the SSC is always higher than 9E09 M_sun Mpc^-3, which is ~40x the cosmic stellar mass density for galaxies in the local Universe. We find a new filamentary structure (~7 Mpc long in projection) connecting the SSC core to the cluster A3559, as well as previously unidentified density peaks. We perform a weak-lensing analysis of the central 1 sqdeg field of the survey obtaining for the central cluster A3558 a mass of M_500=7.63E14 M_sun, in agreement with X-ray based estimates.
  • We have analysed the growth of Brightest Group Galaxies and Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BGGs/BCGs) over the last 3 billion years using a large sample of 883 galaxies from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly Survey. By comparing the stellar mass of BGGs and BCGs in groups and clusters of similar dynamical masses, we find no significant growth between redshift $z=0.27$ and $z=0.09$. We also examine the number of BGGs/BCGs that have line emission, finding that approximately 65 per cent of BGGs/BCGs show H$\alpha$ in emission. From the galaxies where the necessary spectroscopic lines were accurately recovered (54 per cent of the sample), we find that half of this (i.e. 27 per cent of the sample) harbour on-going star formation with rates up to $10\,$M$_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$, and the other half (i.e. 27 per cent of the sample) have an active nucleus (AGN) at the centre. BGGs are more likely to have ongoing star formation, while BCGs show a higher fraction of AGN activity. By examining the position of the BGGs/BCGs with respect to their host dark matter halo we find that around 13 per cent of them do not lie at the centre of the dark matter halo. This could be an indicator of recent cluster-cluster mergers. We conclude that BGGs and BCGs acquired their stellar mass rapidly at higher redshifts as predicted by semi-analytic models, mildly slowing down at low redshifts.
  • A combination of $BRI$ photometry and archival Chandra X-ray data have been used to analyse the effects a minor merger has on the galaxy population of A1664. We utilise adaptive smoothing techniques in the 2D spatial distribution of cluster galaxies to reveal substructure $\sim$ 800 kpc South of the cluster core. We identify this substructure as most likely the remnant core of a merging group which has passed pericentre and responsible for triggering a cold front in the cluster core. We define two samples to represent two different environments within A1664 in accordance with the location of the substructure. We apply a morphological analysis using CAS, M$_{20}$ and Gini to these samples to deduce if there has been any significant effect on the cluster galaxies due to this interaction. We find there are more asymmetric galaxies found in the inner sample (at the 3.7$\sigma$ level) which is likely due to galaxy-galaxy interactions as the merging group passed through core passage. No other differences were found between the inner and outer cluster in our morphological analysis, which we attribute to the limited resolution of our imagery. The colour profiles of the galaxies are found to be consistent with the morphology-density relation suggesting there is no unique environmental effect in A1664 that has enhanced galaxy transformations. This study favours the star formation of cluster galaxies being quenched well before it is able to interact with the merging group and demonstrates that a minor cluster merger has little effect on the observable parameters of cluster galaxies such as morphology and colour.
  • Coma is frequently used as the archetype z~0 galaxy cluster to compare higher redshift work against. It is not clear, however, how representative the Coma cluster is for galaxy clusters of its mass or X-ray luminosity, and significantly: recent works have suggested that the galaxy population of Coma may be in some ways anomolous. In this work, we present a comparison of Coma to an X-ray selected control sample of clusters. We show that although Coma is typical against the control sample in terms of its internal kinematics (substructure and velocity dispersion profile), it has a significantly high (~3sigma) X-ray temperature set against clusters of comparable mass. By de-redshifting our control sample cluster galaxies star-formation rates using a fit to the galaxy main sequence evolution at z < 0.1, we determine that the typical star-formation rate of Coma galaxies as a function of mass is higher than for galaxies in our control sample at a confidence level of > 99 per cent. One way to alleviate this discrepency and bring Coma in-line with the control sample would be to have the distance to Coma to be slightly lower, perhaps through a non-negligible peculiar velocity with respect to the Hubble expansion, but we do not regard this as likely given precision measurements using a variety of approaches. Therefore in summary, we urge caution in using Coma as a z~0 baseline cluster in galaxy evolution studies.
  • We present observations of 18 galaxies from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey made with the SPIRAL optical integral field unit (IFU) on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The galaxies are selected to have a narrow range in stellar mass (6x10^9Msolar < M* <2x10^10 Msolar) in order to focus on the effects of environment. Local galaxy environments are measured quantitatively using 5th nearest neighbour surface densities. We find that the total star formation rates (SFR) measured from the IFU data are consistent with total SFRs measured from aperture correcting either GAMA or Sloan Digital Sky Survey single-fibre observations. The mean differences are SFR_GAMA/SFR_IFU = 1.26+/-0.23, sigma=0.90 and for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey we similarly find SFR_Brinchmann/SFR_IFU = 1.34+/-0.17, sigma=0.67. Examining the relationships with environment, we find off-centre and clumpy Halpha emission is not significantly dependent on environment, being present in 2/7 (29^+20_-11 per cent) galaxies in high-density environments (>0.77 Mpc^-2), and 5/11 (45^+15_-13 per cent) galaxies in low-density environments (<0.77 Mpc^-2). We find a weak but not significant relationship of the total star formation rates of star-forming galaxies with environment. Due to the size of our sample and the scatter observed we do not draw a definitive conclusion about a possible SFR dependence on environment. Examining the spatial distribution of the Halpha emission, we find no evidence for a change in shape or amplitude of the radial profile of star-forming galaxies with environment. If these observations are borne out in larger samples this would infer that any environment-driven star-formation suppression must either act very rapidly (the `infall-and-quench' model) or that galaxies must evolve in a density-dependent manner (an `in-situ evolution' model).
  • We present a combined optical and X-ray analysis of the rich cluster Abell 1882 with the aim of identifying merging substructure and understanding the recent assembly history of this system. Our optical data consist of spectra drawn from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, which lends itself to this kind of detailed study thanks to its depth and high spectroscopic completeness. We use 283 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members to detect and characterize substructure. We complement the optical data with X-ray data taken with both Chandra and XMM. Our analysis reveals that A1882 harbors two main components, A1882A and A1882B, which have a projected separation of 2Mpc and a line of sight velocity difference of v_{los}=-428km/s. The primary system, A1882A, has velocity dispersion sigma_v=500km/s and Chandra (XMM) temperature kT=3.57keV (3.31keV) while the secondary, A1882B, has sigma_v=457km/s and Chandra (XMM) temperature kT=2.39keV (2.12keV). The optical and X-ray estimates for the masses of the two systems are consistent within the uncertainties and indicate that there is twice as much mass in A1882A (M_{500}=1.5-1.9x10^{14}Msolar) when compared with A1882B (M_{500}=0.8-1.0x10^{14}Msolar). We interpret the A1882A/A1882B system as being observed prior to a core passage. Supporting this interpretation is the large projected separation of A1882A and A1882B and the dearth of evidence for a recent (<2Gyr) major interaction in the X-ray data. Two-body analyses indicate that A1882A and A1882B form a bound system with bound incoming solutions strongly favored. We compute blue fractions of f_b=0.28 and 0.18 for the spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies within r_{500} of the centers of A1882A and A1882B, respectively. These blue fractions do not differ significantly from the blue fraction measured from an ensemble of 20 clusters with similar mass and redshift.
  • [Abridged] We present an analysis of optical spectroscopically-identified AGN to M*+1 in a sample of 6 self-similar SDSS galaxy clusters at z=0.07. These clusters are specifically selected to lack significant substructure at bright limits in their central regions so that we are largely able to eliminate the local action of merging clusters on the frequency of AGN. We demonstrate that the AGN fraction increases significantly from the cluster centre to 1.5Rvirial, but tails off at larger radii. If only comparing the cluster core region to regions at ~2Rvirial, no significant variation would be found. We compute the AGN fraction by mass and show that massive galaxies (log(stellar mass)>10.7) are host to a systematically higher fraction of AGN than lower mass galaxies at all radii from the cluster centre. We attribute this deficit of AGN in the cluster centre to the changing mix of galaxy types with radius. We use the WHAN diagnostic to separate weak AGN from `retired' galaxies in which the main ionization mechanism comes from old stellar populations. These retired AGN are found at all radii, while the mass effect is much more pronounced: we find that massive galaxies are more likely to be in the retired class. Further, we show that our AGN have no special position inside galaxy clusters - they are neither preferentially located in the infall regions, nor situated at local maxima of galaxy density. However, we find that the most powerful AGN (with [OIII] equivalent widths <-10Ang) reside at significant velocity offsets in the cluster, and this brings our analysis into agreement with previous work on X-ray selected AGN. Our results suggest that if interactions with other galaxies are responsible for triggering AGN activity, the time-lag between trigger and AGN enhancement must be sufficiently long to obfuscate the encounter site and wipe out the local galaxy density signal.
  • Context: The mass-metallicity relationship (MMR) of star-forming galaxies is well-established, however there is still some disagreement with respect to its exact shape and its possible dependence on other observables. Aims: We measure the MMR in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We compare our measured MMR to that measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and study the dependence of the MMR on various selection criteria to identify potential causes for disparities seen in the literature. Methods: We use strong emission line ratio diagnostics to derive oxygen abundances. We then apply a range of selection criteria for the minimum signal-to-noise in various emission lines, as well as the apparent and absolute magnitude to study variations in the inferred MMR. Results: The shape and position of the MMR can differ significantly depending on the metallicity calibration and selection used. After selecting a robust metallicity calibration amongst those tested, we find that the mass-metallicity relation for redshifts 0.061< z<0.35 in GAMA is in reasonable agreement with that found in the SDSS despite the difference in the luminosity range probed. Conclusions: In view of the significant variations of the MMR brought about by reasonable changes in the sample selection criteria and method, we recommend that care be taken when comparing the MMR from different surveys and studies directly. We also conclude that there could be a modest level of evolution over 0.06<z<0.35 within the GAMA sample.
  • We use the GAMA I dataset combined with GALEX, SDSS and UKIDSS imaging to construct the low-redshift (z<0.1) galaxy luminosity functions in FUV, NUV, ugriz, and YJHK bands from within a single well constrained volume of 3.4 x 10^5 (Mpc/h)^{3}. The derived luminosity distributions are normalised to the SDSS DR7 main survey to reduce the estimated cosmic variance to the 5 per cent level. The data are used to construct the cosmic spectral energy distribution (CSED) from 0.1 to 2.1 \mum free from any wavelength dependent cosmic variance for both the elliptical and non-elliptical populations. The two populations exhibit dramatically different CSEDs as expected for a predominantly old and young population respectively. Using the Driver et al. (2008) prescription for the azimuthally averaged photon escape fraction, the non-ellipticals are corrected for the impact of dust attenuation and the combined CSED constructed. The final results show that the Universe is currently generating (1.8 +/- 0.3) x 10^{35} h W Mpc^{-3} of which (1.2 +/- 0.1) x 10^{35} h W Mpc^{-3} is directly released into the inter-galactic medium and (0.6 +/- 0.1) x 10^{35} h W Mpc^{-3} is reprocessed and reradiated by dust in the far-IR. Using the GAMA data and our dust model we predict the mid and far-IR emission which agrees remarkably well with available data. We therefore provide a robust description of the pre- and post dust attenuated energy output of the nearby Universe from 0.1micron to 0.6mm. The largest uncertainty in this measurement lies in the mid and far-IR bands stemming from the dust attenuation correction and its currently poorly constrained dependence on environment, stellar mass, and morphology.
  • We measure the two-point angular correlation function of a sample of 4,289,223 galaxies with r < 19.4 mag from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a function of photometric redshift, absolute magnitude and colour down to M_r - 5log h = -14 mag. Photometric redshifts are estimated from ugriz model magnitudes and two Petrosian radii using the artificial neural network package ANNz, taking advantage of the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) spectroscopic sample as our training set. The photometric redshifts are then used to determine absolute magnitudes and colours. For all our samples, we estimate the underlying redshift and absolute magnitude distributions using Monte-Carlo resampling. These redshift distributions are used in Limber's equation to obtain spatial correlation function parameters from power law fits to the angular correlation function. We confirm an increase in clustering strength for sub-L* red galaxies compared with ~L* red galaxies at small scales in all redshift bins, whereas for the blue population the correlation length is almost independent of luminosity for ~L* galaxies and fainter. A linear relation between relative bias and log luminosity is found to hold down to luminosities L~0.03L*. We find that the redshift dependence of the bias of the L* population can be described by the passive evolution model of Tegmark & Peebles (1998). A visual inspection of a random sample of our r < 19.4 sample of SDSS galaxies reveals that about 10 per cent are spurious, with a higher contamination rate towards very faint absolute magnitudes due to over-deblended nearby galaxies. We correct for this contamination in our clustering analysis.
  • We present a detailed investigation into the effects of galaxy environment on their star formation rates (SFR) using galaxies observed in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly Survey (GAMA). We use three independent volume-limited samples of galaxies within z < 0.2 and Mr < -17.8. We investigate the known SFR-density relationship and explore in detail the dependence of SFR on stellar mass and density. We show that the SFR-density trend is only visible when we include the passive galaxy population along with the star-forming population. This SFR-density relation is absent when we consider only the star-forming population of galaxies, consistent with previous work. While there is a strong dependence of the EWH?a on density we find, as in previous studies, that these trends are largely due to the passive galaxy population and this relationship is absent when considering a "star-forming" sample of galaxies. We find that stellar mass has the strongest influence on SFR and EWH?a with the environment having no significant effect on the star-formation properties of the star forming population. We also show that the SFR-density relationship is absent for both early and late-type star-forming galaxies. We conclude that the stellar mass has the largest impact on the current SFR of a galaxy, and any environmental effect is not detectable. The observation that the trends with density are due to the changing morphology fraction with density implies that the timescales must be very short for any quenching of the SFR in infalling galaxies. Alternatively galaxies may in fact undergo predominantly in-situ evolution where the infall and quenching of galaxies from the field into dense environments is not the dominant evolutionary mode.
  • Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) is a project to study galaxy formation and evolution, combining imaging data from ultraviolet to radio with spectroscopic data from the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. Using data from phase 1 of GAMA, taken over three observing seasons, and correcting for various minor sources of incompleteness, we calculate galaxy luminosity functions (LFs) and their evolution in the ugriz passbands. At low redshift, z < 0.1, we find that blue galaxies, defined according to a magnitude-dependent but non-evolving colour cut, are reasonably well fit over a range of more than ten magnitudes by simple Schechter functions in all bands. Red galaxies, and the combined blue-plus-red sample, require double power-law Schechter functions to fit a dip in their LF faintward of the characteristic magnitude M* before a steepening faint end. This upturn is at least partly due to dust-reddened disk galaxies. We measure evolution of the galaxy LF over the redshift range 0.002 < z < 0.5 using both a parametric fit and by measuring binned LFs in redshift slices. The characteristic luminosity L* is found to increase with redshift in all bands, with red galaxies showing stronger luminosity evolution than blue galaxies. The comoving number density of blue galaxies increases with redshift, while that of red galaxies decreases, consistent with prevailing movement from blue cloud to red sequence. As well as being more numerous at higher redshift, blue galaxies also dominate the overall luminosity density beyond redshifts z = 0.2. At lower redshifts, the luminosity density is dominated by red galaxies in the riz bands, by blue galaxies in u and g.
  • EMU is a wide-field radio continuum survey planned for the new Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope. The primary goal of EMU is to make a deep (rms ~ 10 microJy/beam) radio continuum survey of the entire Southern Sky at 1.3 GHz, extending as far North as +30 degrees declination, with a resolution of 10 arcsec. EMU is expected to detect and catalogue about 70 million galaxies, including typical star-forming galaxies up to z~1, powerful starbursts to even greater redshifts, and AGNs to the edge of the visible Universe. It will undoubtedly discover new classes of object. This paper defines the science goals and parameters of the survey, and describes the development of techniques necessary to maximise the science return from EMU.
  • The stellar initial mass function (IMF) describes the distribution in stellar masses produced from a burst of star formation. For more than fifty years, the implicit assumption underpinning most areas of research involving the IMF has been that it is universal, regardless of time and environment. We measure the high-mass IMF slope for a sample of low-to-moderate redshift galaxies from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. The large range in luminosities and galaxy masses of the sample permits the exploration of underlying IMF dependencies. A strong IMF-star formation rate dependency is discovered, which shows that highly star forming galaxies form proportionally more massive stars (they have IMFs with flatter power-law slopes) than galaxies with low star formation rates. This has a significant impact on a wide variety of galaxy evolution studies, all of which rely on assumptions about the slope of the IMF. Our result is supported by, and provides an explanation for, the results of numerous recent explorations suggesting a variation of or evolution in the IMF.
  • We use multiwavelength data from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) and Herschel ATLAS (H-ATLAS) surveys to compare the relationship between various dust obscuration measures in galaxies. We explore the connections between the ultraviolet (UV) spectral slope, $\beta$, the Balmer decrement, and the far infrared (IR) to $150\,$nm far ultraviolet (FUV) luminosity ratio. We explore trends with galaxy mass, star formation rate (SFR) and redshift in order to identify possible systematics in these various measures. We reiterate the finding of other authors that there is a large scatter between the Balmer decrement and the $\beta$ parameter, and that $\beta$ may be poorly constrained when derived from only two broad passbands in the UV. We also emphasise that FUV derived SFRs, corrected for dust obscuration using $\beta$, will be overestimated unless a modified relation between $\beta$ and the attenuation factor is used. Even in the optimum case, the resulting SFRs have a significant scatter, well over an order of magnitude. While there is a stronger correlation between the IR to FUV luminosity ratio and $\beta$ parameter than with the Balmer decrement, neither of these correlations are particularly tight, and dust corrections based on $\beta$ for high redshift galaxy SFRs must be treated with caution. We conclude with a description of the extent to which the different obscuration measures are consistent with each other as well as the effects of including other galactic properties on these correlations.
  • We present self-consistent star formation rates derived through pan-spectral analysis of galaxies drawn from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We determine the most appropriate form of dust obscuration correction via application of a range of extinction laws drawn from the literature as applied to Halpha, [O{II}] and UV luminosities. These corrections are applied to a sample of 31,508 galaxies from the GAMA survey at z < 0.35. We consider several different obscuration curves, including those of Milky Way, Calzetti (2001) and Fischera and Dopita (2005) curves and their effects on the observed luminosities. At the core of this technique is the observed Balmer decrement, and we provide a prescription to apply optimal obscuration corrections using the Balmer decrement. We carry out an analysis of the star formation history (SFH) using stellar population synthesis tools to investigate the evolutionary history of our sample of galaxies as well as to understand the effects of variation in the Initial Mass Function (IMF) and the effects this has on the evolutionary history of galaxies. We find that the Fischera and Dopita (2005) obscuration curve with an R_{v} value of 4.5 gives the best agreement between the different SFR indicators. The 2200A feature needed to be removed from this curve to obtain complete consistency between all SFR indicators suggesting that this feature may not be common in the average integrated attenuation of galaxy emission. We also find that the UV dust obscuration is strongly dependent on the SFR.
  • We perform an extensive analysis of the Civ line in three large spectroscopic surveys of quasars. Differing approaches for fitting the Civ line can be found in the literature, and we compare the most common methods to highlight the relative systematics associated with each. We develop a line fitting procedure and apply it to the Civ line in spectra from the SDSS, 2QZ and 2SLAQ surveys. Our results are compared with a previous study of the Mgii line in the same sample. Civ tends to be broader than the Mgii line in spectra that have both, and the average ratio between the lines is consistent with a simplistic model for a photoionised, virialised and stratified broad-line region. There is a statistically significant correlation between the widths of the Civ and Mgii lines. However, the correlation is weak, and the scatter around a best fit is only marginally less than the full dynamic range of line widths. Motivated by previous work, we examine the dispersion in the distribution of Civ line widths. We find that the dispersion in Civ line widths is essentially independent of both redshift and luminosity. This is in stark contrast to the Mgii line, which shows a strong luminosity dependence. Finally we consider our results in terms of their implications for virial black hole mass estimation. The inconsistency between Mgii and Civ line widths in single spectra, combined with the differing behaviour of the Mgii and Civ line width distributions, indicates that there must be an inconsistency between Mgii and Civ virial mass estimators. Furthermore, the level of intrinsic dispersion in Mgii and Civ line widths contributes less dynamic range to virial mass estimates than the error associated with the estimates. The indication is that the line width term in these UV virial mass estimators may be essentially irrelevant with respect to the typical uncertainty on a mass estimate.
  • The Aquarius project is the first simulation that can resolve the full mass range of potential globular cluster formation sites. With a particle mass $m_\mathrm{p}=1.4 \times 10^4$\Msun, Aquarius yields more than 100 million particles within the virial radius of the central halo which has a mass of $1.8 \times 10^{12}$\Msun, similar to that of the Milky Way. With this particle mass, dark matter concentrations (haloes) as small as 10$^6$ M$_\odot$ will contain a minimum of 100 particles.Here, we use this simulation to test a model of metal-poor globular cluster formation based on collapse physics. In our model, globular clusters form when the virial temperatures of haloes first exceed $10^4$ K as this is when electronic transitions allow the gas to cool efficiently. We calculate the ionising flux from the stars in these first clusters and stop the formation of new clusters when all the baryonic gas of the galaxy is ionised. This is achieved by adopting reasonable values for the star formation efficiencies and escape fraction of ionising photons. The model is successful in that it predicts ages (peak age $\sim$ 13.3 Gyrs) and a spatial distribution of metal-poor globular clusters which are consistent with the observed populations in the Milky Way. We then test a scenario of metal-rich cluster formation by examining mergers that trigger star formation within central gas disks. This results in younger ($\sim$ 7--13.3 Gyrs), more centrally-located clusters (40 metal-rich GCs within 18 kpc from the centre of the host) which are consistent with the Galactic metal-rich population. We test an alternate model in which metal-rich globular clusters form in dwarf galaxies that become stripped as they merge with the main halo. We find that this process is inconsistent with observed metal-rich globulars.
  • We investigate the evolution of the optical and near-infrared colour-magnitude relation in an homogeneous sample of massive clusters from z = 1 to the present epoch. By comparing deep Hubble Space Telescope ACS imaging of X-ray selected MACS survey clusters at z = 0.5 to the similarly selected LARCS sample at z = 0.1 we find that the rest-frame d(U -V)/dV slope of the colour-magnitude relation evolves with redshift which we attribute to the build up of the red sequence over time. This rest frame slope evolution is not adequately reproduced by that predicted from semi-analytic models based on the Millennium Simulation despite a prescription for the build up of the red sequence by in-falling galaxies, 'strangulation'. We observe no strong correlation between this slope and the cluster environment at a given redshift demonstrating that the observed evolution is not due to a secondary correlation. Also presented are near-infrared UKIRT WFCAM observations of the LARCS clusters which confirm and improve on the the result from Stott et al. (2007) finding that there has been a two-fold increase in faint MV > -20 galaxies on the red sequence since z = 0.5 to a significance of 5sigma.
  • We assemble a sample of galaxy clusters whose brightest members are dumbbell galaxies and compare them with a control sample in order to investigate if they are the result of recent mergers. We show that the dumbbell sample is no more likely than other clusters to exhibit subclustering. However, they are much more likely to have at least one dumbbell component possessing a significant peculiar velocity with respect to the parent cluster than a non-dumbbell brightest cluster member. We interpret this in the context of seeing the clusters at various stages of post-merger relaxation.