• We present late-time optical spectroscopy and X-ray, UV, and optical photometry of the nearby ($d=214$ Mpc, $z=0.0479$) tidal disruption event (TDE) ASASSN-15oi. The optical spectra span 450 days after discovery and show little remaining transient emission or evolution after roughly 3 months. In contrast, the Swift and XMM-Newton observations indicate the presence of evolving X-ray emission and lingering thermal UV emission that is still present 600 days after discovery. The thermal component of the X-ray emission shows a unique, slow brightening by roughly an order of magnitude to become the dominant source of emission from the TDE at later times, while the hard component of the X-ray emission remains weak and relatively constant throughout the flare. The TDE radiated $(1.32\pm0.06)\times10^{51}$ ergs across all wavelengths, and the UV and optical emission is consistent with a power law decline and potentially indicative of a late-time shift in the power-law index that could be caused by a transition in the dominant emission mechanism.
  • We present the ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopic evolution of a tidal disruption event (TDE) for the first time. After the discovery of the nearby TDE iPTF16fnl, we obtained a series of observations with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The dominant emission features closely resemble those seen in the UV spectra of the TDE ASASSN-14li and are also similar to those of N-rich quasars. However, there is significant evolution in the shape and central wavelength of the line profiles over the course of our observations, such that at early times the lines are broad and redshifted, while at later times the lines are significantly narrower and peak near the wavelengths of their corresponding atomic transitions. Like ASASSN-14li, but unlike N-rich quasars, iPTF16fnl shows neither MgII$\lambda 2798$\AA\ nor CIII]$\lambda 1909$\AA\ emission features. We also present optical photometry and spectroscopy, which suggest that the complex HeII profiles observed in the optical spectra of many TDEs are in part due to the presence of NIII and CIII Wolf-Rayet features, which can potentially serve as probes of the far-UV when space-based observations are not possible. Finally, we use Swift XRT and UVOT observations to place strong limits on the X-ray emission and determine the characteristic temperature, radius, and luminosity of the emitting material. We find that iPTF16fnl is subluminous and evolves more rapidly than other optically discovered TDEs.
  • Fomalhaut b is a directly imaged object in the debris disk of the star Fomalhaut. It has been hypothesized to be a planet, however there are issues with the observed colours of the object that do not fit planetary models. An alternative hypothesis is that the object is a neutron star in the near fore- or background of Fomalhaut's disk. We test if Fomalhaut b could be a neutron star using X-ray observations with Chandra's HRC-I instrument in the energy range of 0.08-10 keV. We do not detect X-ray emission from either Fomalhaut b or the star Fomalhaut itself. Our nondetection corresponds to an upper limit on the X-ray flux of Fomalhaut b of F_X < 1.3e-14 erg/cm/s^2 in the energy range 0.08-10 keV. For the A-type central star Fomalhaut, we derive an X-ray upper limit of L_X < 2e25 erg/s in the energy range 0.08-10 keV. Fomalhaut b's X-ray non-detection constrains the parameter space for a possible neutron star significantly, implying surface temperatures lower than 91000 K and distances closer than 13.3 pc to the solar system. In addition we find that reflected starlight from the central star fits the available optical detections of Fomalhaut b; a smaller planet with a large ring system might explain such a scenario.
  • We present late-time optical spectroscopy taken with the Large Binocular Telescope's Multi-Object Double Spectrograph, late-time SWIFT UVOT and XRT observations, as well as improved ASAS-SN pre-discovery limits on the nearby (d=90.3 Mpc, z=0.0206) tidal disruption event (TDE) ASASSN-14li. The late-time optical spectra show H$\alpha$ emission well in excess of that seen in the SDSS host galaxy spectrum, indicating that the processes powering the luminous flares associated with TDEs can operate for several hundreds of days. The SWIFT observations reveal the presence of lingering apparently thermal UV (T$_{\rm UV} \sim 3.5\times10^4$ K) and X-ray (T$_{\rm X} \sim 7\times10^5$ K) emission. The characteristic temperatures evolve by, at most, a factor of $\sim2$ over the 600 day follow-up campaign. The X-ray, UV, and H$\alpha$ luminosities evolve roughly in tandem and at a rate that is consistent with a power-law decay at late times. This behavior is in stark contrast with the majority of optically discovered TDEs, which are X-ray faint and evolve on shorter timescales. Finally we address how the unique properties of ASASSN-14li can be used to probe the relationship between the TDE rate and host galaxy properties.