• Far-infrared (FIR) images and photometry are presented for 201 Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies [LIRGs: log$(L_{\rm IR}/L_\odot) = 11.00 - 11.99$, ULIRGs: log$(L_{\rm IR}/L_\odot) = 12.00 - 12.99$], in the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) based on observations with the $Herschel$ $Space$ $Observatory$ Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) and the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) instruments. The image atlas displays each GOALS target in the three PACS bands (70, 100, and 160 $\mu$m) and the three SPIRE bands (250, 350, and 500 $\mu$m), optimized to reveal structures at both high and low surface brightness levels, with images scaled to simplify comparison of structures in the same physical areas of $\sim$$100\times100$ kpc$^2$. Flux densities of companion galaxies in merging systems are provided where possible, depending on their angular separation and the spatial resolution in each passband, along with integrated system fluxes (sum of components). This dataset constitutes the imaging and photometric component of the GOALS Herschel OT1 observing program, and is complementary to atlases presented for the Hubble Space Telescope (Evans et al. 2017, in prep.), Spitzer Space Telescope (Mazzarella et al. 2017, in prep.), and Chandra X-ray Observatory (Iwasawa et al. 2011, 2017, in prep.). Collectively these data will enable a wide range of detailed studies of AGN and starburst activity within the most luminous infrared galaxies in the local Universe.
  • We present the first Herschel spectroscopic detections of the [OI]63 and [CII]158 micron fine-structure transitions, and a single para-H2O line from the 35 x 15 kpc^2 shocked intergalactic filament in Stephan's Quintet. The filament is believed to have been formed when a high-speed intruder to the group collided with clumpy intergroup gas. Observations with the PACS spectrometer provide evidence for broad (> 1000 km s^-1) luminous [CII] line profiles, as well as fainter [OI]63micron emission. SPIRE FTS observations reveal water emission from the p-H2O (111-000) transition at several positions in the filament, but no other molecular lines. The H2O line is narrow, and may be associated with denser intermediate-velocity gas experiencing the strongest shock-heating. The [CII]/PAH{tot) and [CII]/FIR ratios are too large to be explained by normal photo-electric heating in PDRs. HII region excitation or X-ray/Cosmic Ray heating can also be ruled out. The observations lead to the conclusion that a large fraction the molecular gas is diffuse and warm. We propose that the [CII], [OI] and warm H2 line emission is powered by a turbulent cascade in which kinetic energy from the galaxy collision with the IGM is dissipated to small scales and low-velocities, via shocks and turbulent eddies. Low-velocity magnetic shocks can help explain both the [CII]/[OI] ratio, and the relatively high [CII]/H2 ratios observed. The discovery that [CII] emission can be enhanced, in large-scale turbulent regions in collisional environments has implications for the interpretation of [CII] emission in high-z galaxies.
  • We present the discovery of strong mid-infrared emission lines of molecular hydrogen of apparently high velocity dispersion (~870 km/s) originating from a group-wide shock wave in Stephan's Quintet. These Spitzer Space Telescope observations reveal emission lines of molecular hydrogen and little else. this is the first time an almost pure H_2 line spectrum has been seen in an extragalactic object. Along with the absence of PAH features and very low excitation ionized gas tracers, the spectra resemble shocked gas seen in Galactic supernova remnants, but on a vast scale. The molecular emission extends over 24 kpc along the X-ray emitting shock-front, but has ten times the surface luminosity as the soft X-rays, and about one-third the surface luminosity of the IR continuum. We suggest that the powerful H_2 emission is generated by the shock wave caused when a high-velocity intruder galaxy collides with filaments of gas in the galaxy group. Our observations suggest a close connection between galaxy-scale shock-waves and strong broad H_2 emission lines, like those seen in the spectra of Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies where high-speed collisions between galaxy disks are common.