• Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) is a component of diffuse Galactic radiation observed at frequencies in the range $\approx 10$-60 GHz. AME was first detected in 1996 and recognised as an additional component of emission in 1997. Since then, AME has been observed by a range of experiments and in a variety of environments. AME is spatially correlated with far-IR thermal dust emission but cannot be explained by synchrotron or free-free emission mechanisms, and is far in excess of the emission contributed by thermal dust emission with the power-law opacity consistent with the observed emission at sub-mm wavelengths. Polarization observations have shown that AME is very weakly polarized ($\lesssim 1$%). The most natural explanation for AME is rotational emission from ultra-small dust grains ("spinning dust"), first postulated in 1957. Magnetic dipole radiation from thermal fluctuations in the magnetization of magnetic grain materials may also be contributing to the AME, particularly at higher frequencies ($\gtrsim 50$ GHz). AME is also an important foreground for Cosmic Microwave Background analyses. This paper presents a review and the current state-of-play in AME research, which was discussed in an AME workshop held at ESTEC, The Netherlands, June 2016.
  • In this analysis we illustrate how the relatively new emission mechanism known as spinning dust can be used to characterize dust grains in the interstellar medium. We demonstrate this by using spinning dust emission observations to constrain the abundance of very small dust grains (a $\lesssim$ 10nm) in a sample of Galactic cold cores. Using the physical properties of the cores in our sample as inputs to a spinning dust model, we predict the expected level of emission at a wavelength of 1cm for four different very small dust grain abundances, which we constrain by comparing to 1cm CARMA observations. For all of our cores we find a depletion of very small grains, which we suggest is due to the process of grain growth. This work represents the first time that spinning dust emission has been used to constrain the physical properties of interstellar dust grains.
  • We present polarization observations of two Galactic plane fields centered on Galactic coordinates (l,b)=(0 deg,0 deg) and (329 deg, 0 deg) at Q- (43 GHz) and W-band (95 GHz), covering between 301 and 539 square degrees depending on frequency and field. These measurements were made with the QUIET instrument between 2008 October and 2010 December, and include a total of 1263 hours of observations. The resulting maps represent the deepest large-area Galactic polarization observations published to date at the relevant frequencies with instrumental rms noise varying between 1.8 and 2.8 uK deg, 2.3-6 times deeper than corresponding WMAP and Planck maps. The angular resolution is 27.3' and 12.8' FWHM at Q- and W-band, respectively. We find excellent agreement between the QUIET and WMAP maps over the entire fields, and no compelling evidence for significant residual instrumental systematic errors in either experiment, whereas the Planck 44 GHz map deviates from these in a manner consistent with reported systematic uncertainties for this channel. We combine QUIET and WMAP data to compute inverse-variance-weighted average maps, effectively retaining small angular scales from QUIET and large angular scales from WMAP. From these combined maps, we derive constraints on several important astrophysical quantities, including a robust detection of polarized synchrotron spectral index steepening of ~0.2 off the plane, as well as the Faraday rotation measure toward the Galactic center (RM=-4000 +/- 200 rad m^-2), all of which are consistent with previously published results. Both the raw QUIET and the co-added QUIET+WMAP maps are made publicly available together with all necessary ancillary information.
  • We present the first search for spinning dust emission from a sample of 34 Galactic cold cores, performed using the CARMA interferometer. For each of our cores we use photometric data from the Herschel Space Observatory to constrain N_{H}, T_{d}, n_{H}, and G_{0}. By computing the mass of the cores and comparing it to the Bonnor-Ebert mass, we determined that 29 of the 34 cores are gravitationally unstable and undergoing collapse. In fact, we found that 6 cores are associated with at least one young stellar object, suggestive of their proto-stellar nature. By investigating the physical conditions within each core, we can shed light on the cm emission revealed (or not) by our CARMA observations. Indeed, we find that only 3 of our cores have any significant detectable cm emission. Using a spinning dust model, we predict the expected level of spinning dust emission in each core and find that for all 34 cores, the predicted level of emission is larger than the observed cm emission constrained by the CARMA observations. Moreover, even in the cores for which we do detect cm emission, we cannot, at this stage, discriminate between free-free emission from young stellar objects and spinning dust emission. We emphasise that, although the CARMA observations described in this analysis place important constraints on the presence of spinning dust in cold, dense environments, the source sample targeted by these observations is not statistically representative of the entire population of Galactic cores.
  • LDN 1622 has previously been identified as a possible strong source of dust-correlated Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME). Previous observations were limited by resolution meaning that the radio emission could not be compared with current generation high-resolution infrared data from Herschel, Spitzer or WISE. This Paper presents arcminute resolution mapping observations of LDN 1622 at 4.85 GHz and 13.7 GHz using the 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. The 4.85 GHz map reveals a corona of free-free emission enclosing LDN 1622 that traces the photo-dissociation region of the cloud. The brightest peaks of the 4.85 GHz map are found to be within 10% agreement with the expected free-free predicted by SHASSA H{\alpha} data of LDN 1622. At 13.7 GHz the AME flux density was found to be 7.0 $\pm$ 1.4 mJy and evidence is presented for a rising spectrum between 13.7 GHz and 31 GHz. The spinning dust model of AME is found to naturally account for the flux seen at 13.7 GHz. Correlations between the diffuse 13.7 GHz emission and the diffuse mid-infrared emission are used to further demonstrate that the emission originating from LDN 1622 at 13.7 GHz is described by the spinning dust model.
  • We present polarization measurements of extragalactic radio sources observed during the Cosmic Microwave Background polarization survey of the Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET), operating at 43 GHz (Q-band) and 95 GHz (W-band). We examine sources selected at 20 GHz from the public, $>$40 mJy catalog of the Australia Telescope (AT20G) survey. There are $\sim$480 such sources within QUIET's four low-foreground survey patches, including the nearby radio galaxies Centaurus A and Pictor A. The median error on our polarized flux density measurements is 30--40 mJy per Stokes parameter. At S/N $> 3$ significance, we detect linear polarization for seven sources in Q-band and six in W-band; only $1.3 \pm 1.1$ detections per frequency band are expected by chance. For sources without a detection of polarized emission, we find that half of the sources have polarization amplitudes below 90 mJy (Q-band) and 106 mJy (W-band), at 95% confidence. Finally, we compare our polarization measurements to intensity and polarization measurements of the same sources from the literature. For the four sources with WMAP and Planck intensity measurements $>1$ Jy, the polarization fraction are above 1% in both QUIET bands. At high significance, we compute polarization fractions as much as 10--20% for some sources, but the effects of source variability may cut that level in half for contemporaneous comparisons. Our results indicate that simple models---ones that scale a fixed polarization fraction with frequency---are inadequate to model the behavior of these sources and their contributions to polarization maps.
  • We present observations performed with the Green Bank Telescope at 1.4 and 5 GHz of three strips coincident with the anomalous microwave emission features previously identified in the Perseus molecular cloud at 33 GHz with the Very Small Array. With these observations we determine the level of the low frequency (~1 - 5 GHz) emission. We do not detect any significant extended emission in these regions and we compute conservative 3\sigma upper limits on the fraction of free-free emission at 33 GHz of 27%, 12%, and 18% for the three strips, indicating that the level of the emission at 1.4 and 5 GHz cannot account for the emission observed at 33 GHz. Additionally, we find that the low frequency emission is not spatially correlated with the emission observed at 33 GHz. These results indicate that the emission observed in the Perseus molecular cloud at 33 GHz, is indeed in excess over the low frequency emission, hence confirming its anomalous nature.
  • The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95GHz. The 43-GHz results have been published in QUIET Collaboration et al. (2011), and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95-GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hours of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 uK sqrt(s). Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of ~1000 square degrees with an effective angular resolution of 12.8', allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high-signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-Cl (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB and BB power spectra between l=25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with LCDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r=1.1+0.9-0.8 (r<2.8 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the ML pipeline, and r=1.2+0.9-0.8 (r<2.7 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the PCL pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r=0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.
  • The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is designed to measure polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background, targeting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves at large angular scales (~ 1 degree). Between 2008 October and 2010 December, two independent receiver arrays were deployed sequentially on a 1.4 m side-fed Dragonian telescope. The polarimeters which form the focal planes use a highly compact design based on High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) that provides simultaneous measurements of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and I in a single module. The 17-element Q-band polarimeter array, with a central frequency of 43.1 GHz, has the best sensitivity (69 uK sqrt(s)) and the lowest instrumental systematic errors ever achieved in this band, contributing to the tensor-to-scalar ratio at r < 0.1. The 84-element W-band polarimeter array has a sensitivity of 87 uK sqrt(s) at a central frequency of 94.5 GHz. It has the lowest systematic errors to date, contributing at r < 0.01. The two arrays together cover multipoles in the range l= 25-975. These are the largest HEMT-based arrays deployed to date. This article describes the design, calibration, performance of, and sources of systematic error for the instrument.
  • The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) employs coherent receivers at 43GHz and 95GHz, operating on the Chajnantor plateau in the Atacama Desert in Chile, to measure the anisotropy in the polarization of the CMB. QUIET primarily targets the B modes from primordial gravitational waves. The combination of these frequencies gives sensitivity to foreground contributions from diffuse Galactic synchrotron radiation. Between 2008 October and 2010 December, >10,000hours of data were collected, first with the 19-element 43GHz array (3458hours) and then with the 90-element 95GHz array. Each array observes the same four fields, selected for low foregrounds, together covering ~1000deg^2. This paper reports initial results from the 43GHz receiver which has an array sensitivity to CMB fluctuations of 69uK sqrt(s). The data were extensively studied with a large suite of null tests before the power spectra, determined with two independent pipelines, were examined. Analysis choices, including data selection, were modified until the null tests passed. Cross correlating maps with different telescope pointings is used to eliminate a bias. This paper reports the EE, BB and EB power spectra in the multipole range ell=25-475. With the exception of the lowest multipole bin for one of the fields, where a polarized foreground, consistent with Galactic synchrotron radiation, is detected with 3sigma significance, the E-mode spectrum is consistent with the LCDM model, confirming the only previous detection of the first acoustic peak. The B-mode spectrum is consistent with zero, leading to a measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r=0.35+1.06-0.87. The combination of a new time-stream double-demodulation technique, Mizuguchi-Dragone optics, natural sky rotation, and frequent boresight rotation leads to the lowest level of systematic contamination in the B-mode power so far reported, below the level of r=0.1
  • Simple broadband microwave interconnects are needed for increasing the size of focal plane heterodyne radiometer arrays. We have measured loss and cross-talk for arrays of microstrip transmission lines in flex circuit technology at 297 and 77 K, finding good performance to at least 20 GHz. The dielectric constant of Kapton substrates changes very little from 297 to 77 K, and the electrical loss drops. The small cross-sectional area of metal in a printed circuit structure yields overall thermal conductivities similar to stainless steel coaxial cable. Operationally, the main performance tradeoffs are between crosstalk and thermal conductivity. We tested a patterned ground plane to reduce heat flux.
  • The diffuse cm-wave IR-correlated signal, the "anomalous" CMB foreground, is thought to arise in the dust in cirrus clouds. We present Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) cm-wave data of two translucent clouds, {\zeta} Oph and LDN 1780 with the aim of characterising the anomalous emission in the translucent cloud environment. In {\zeta} Oph, the measured brightness at 31 GHz is 2.4{\sigma} higher than an extrapolation from 5 GHz measurements assuming a free-free spectrum on 8 arcmin scales. The SED of this cloud on angular scales of 1{\odot} is dominated by free-free emission in the cm-range. In LDN 1780 we detected a 3 {\sigma} excess in the SED on angular scales of 1{\odot} that can be fitted using a spinning dust model. In this cloud, there is a spatial correlation between the CBI data and IR images, which trace dust. The correlation is better with near-IR templates (IRAS 12 and 25 {\mu}m) than with IRAS 100 {\mu}m, which suggests a very small grain origin for the emission at 31 GHz. We calculated the 31 GHz emissivities in both clouds. They are similar and have intermediate values between that of cirrus clouds and dark clouds. Nevertheless, we found an indication of an inverse relationship between emissivity and column density, which further supports the VSGs origin for the cm-emission since the proportion of big relative to small grains is smaller in diffuse clouds.
  • The unified model of active galactic nuclei (AGN) predicts silicate emission features at 10 and 18 microns in type 1 AGN, and such features have now been observed in objects ranging from distant QSOs to nearby LINERs. More surprising, however, is the detection of silicate emission in a few type 2 AGN. By combining Gemini and Spitzer mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of NGC 2110, the closest known Seyfert 2 galaxy with silicate emission features, we can constrain the location of the silicate emitting region to within 32 pc of the nucleus. This is the strongest constraint yet on the size of the silicate emitting region in a Seyfert galaxy of any type. While this result is consistent with a narrow line region origin for the emission, comparison with clumpy torus models demonstrates that emission from an edge-on torus can also explain the silicate emission features and 2-20 micron spectral energy distribution of this object. In many of the best-fitting models the torus has only a small number of clouds along the line of sight, and does not extend far above the equatorial plane. Extended silicate-emitting regions may well be present in AGN, but this work establishes that emission from the torus itself is also a viable option for the origin of silicate emission features in active galaxies of both type 1 and type 2.
  • We have measured mid-infrared radiation from an orientation-unbiased sample of 3CRR galaxies and quasars at redshifts 0.4 < z < 1.2 with the IRS and MIPS instruments on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Powerful emission (L_24micron > 10^22.4 W/Hz/sr) was detected from all but one of the sources. We fit the Spitzer data as well as other measurements from the literature with synchrotron and dust components. The IRS data provide powerful constraints on the fits. At 15 microns, quasars are typically four times brighter than radio galaxies with the same isotropic radio power. Based on our fits, half of this difference can be attributed to the presence of non-thermal emission in the quasars but not the radio galaxies. The other half is consistent with dust absorption in the radio galaxies but not the quasars. Fitted optical depths are anti-correlated with core dominance, from which we infer an equatorial distribution of dust around the central engine. The median optical depth at 9.7 microns for objects with core-dominance factor R > 10^-2 is approximately 0.4; for objects with R < 10^-2, it is 1.1. We have thus addressed a long-standing question in the unification of FR II quasars and galaxies: quasars are more luminous in the mid-infrared than galaxies because of a combination of Doppler-boosted synchrotron emission in quasars and extinction in galaxies, both orientation-dependent effects.
  • We describe observations of 9.7 um silicate features in 97 AGNs, exhibiting a wide range of AGN types and of X-ray extinction toward the central nuclei. We find that the strength of the silicate feature correlates with the HI column density estimated from fitting the X-ray data, such that low HI columns correspond to silicate emission while high columns correspond to silicate absorption. The behavior is generally consistent with unification models where the large diversity in AGN properties is caused by viewing-angle-dependent obscuration of the nucleus. Radio-loud AGNs and radio-quiet quasars follow roughly the correlation between HI columns and the strength of the silicate feature defined by Seyfert galaxies. The agreement among AGN types suggests a high-level unification with similar characteristics for the structure of the obscuring material. We demonstrate the implications for unification models qualitatively with a conceptual disk model. The model includes an inner accretion disk (< 0.1 pc in radius), a middle disk (0.1-10 pc in radius) with a dense diffuse component and with embedded denser clouds, and an outer clumpy disk (10-300 pc in radius).
  • We present coincident observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from the Very Small Array (VSA) and Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) telescopes. The consistency of the full datasets is tested in the map plane and the Fourier plane, prior to the usual compression of CMB data into flat bandpowers. Of the three mosaics observed by each group, two are found to be in excellent agreement. In the third mosaic, there is a 2 sigma discrepancy between the correlation of the data and the level expected from Monte Carlo simulations. This is shown to be consistent with increased phase calibration errors on VSA data during summer observations. We also consider the parameter estimation method of each group. The key difference is the use of the variance window function in place of the bandpower window function, an approximation used by the VSA group. A re-evaluation of the VSA parameter estimates, using bandpower windows, shows that the two methods yield consistent results.