• The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET), launched for installation on the International Space Station (ISS) in August, 2015, has been accumulating scientific data since October, 2015. CALET is intended to perform long-duration observations of high-energy cosmic rays onboard the ISS. CALET directly measures the cosmic-ray electron spectrum in the energy range of 1 GeV to 20 TeV with a 2% energy resolution above 30 GeV. In addition, the instrument can measure the spectrum of gamma rays well into the TeV range, and the spectra of protons and nuclei up to a PeV. In order to operate the CALET onboard ISS, JAXA Ground Support Equipment (JAXA-GSE) and the Waseda CALET Operations Center (WCOC) have been established. Scientific operations using CALET are planned at WCOC, taking into account orbital variations of geomagnetic rigidity cutoff. Scheduled command sequences are used to control the CALET observation modes on orbit. Calibration data acquisition by, for example, recording pedestal and penetrating particle events, a low-energy electron trigger mode operating at high geomagnetic latitude, a low-energy gamma-ray trigger mode operating at low geomagnetic latitude, and an ultra heavy trigger mode, are scheduled around the ISS orbit while maintaining maximum exposure to high-energy electrons and other high-energy shower events by always having the high-energy trigger mode active. The WCOC also prepares and distributes CALET flight data to collaborators in Italy and the United States. As of August 31, 2017, the total observation time is 689 days with a live time fraction of the total time of approximately 84%. Nearly 450 million events are collected with a high-energy (E>10 GeV) trigger. By combining all operation modes with the excellent-quality on-orbit data collected thus far, it is expected that a five-year observation period will provide a wealth of new and interesting results.
  • We apply three data science techniques, Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF), Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA), to simulated X-ray energy spectra of a particular class of super-massive black holes. Two competing physical models, one whose variable components are additive and the other whose variable components are multiplicative, are known to successfully describe X-ray spectral variation of these super-massive black holes, within accuracy of the contemporary observation. We hope to utilize these techniques to compare the viability of the models by probing the mathematical structure of the observed spectra, while comparing advantages and disadvantages of each technique. We find that PCA is best to determine the dimensionality of a dataset, while NMF is better suited for interpreting spectral components and comparing them in terms of the physical models in question. ICA is able to reconstruct the parameters responsible for spectral variation. In addition, we find that the results of these techniques are sufficiently different that applying them to observed data may be a useful test in comparing the accuracy of the two spectral models.
  • We present upper limits in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray bands at the time of the LIGO gravitational-wave event GW 151226 derived from the CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) observation. The main instrument of CALET, CALorimeter (CAL), observes gamma-rays from ~1 GeV up to 10 TeV with a field of view of ~2 sr. The CALET gamma-ray burst monitor (CGBM) views ~3 sr and ~2pi sr of the sky in the 7 keV - 1 MeV and the 40 keV - 20 MeV bands, respectively, by using two different scintillator-based instruments. The CGBM covered 32.5% and 49.1% of the GW 151226 sky localization probability in the 7 keV - 1 MeV and 40 keV - 20 MeV bands respectively. We place a 90% upper limit of 2 x 10^{-7} erg cm-2 s-1 in the 1 - 100 GeV band where CAL reaches 15% of the integrated LIGO probability (~1.1 sr). The CGBM 7 sigma upper limits are 1.0 x 10^{-6} erg cm-2 s-1 (7-500 keV) and 1.8 x 10^{-6} erg cm-2 s-1 (50-1000 keV) for one second exposure. Those upper limits correspond to the luminosity of 3-5 x 10^{49} erg s-1 which is significantly lower than typical short GRBs.
  • We apply the light bending model of X-ray variability to Suzaku data of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15. We analyze the energy dependence of the root mean square (rms) variability, and discuss conditions necessary for the model to explain the characteristic decrease of the source variability around 5-8 keV. A model, where the X-ray source moves radially rather than vertically close to the disk surface, can indeed reproduce the reduced variability near the energy of the Fe Kalpha line, although the formal fit quality is poor. The model then predicts the energy spectra, which can be compared to observational data. The spectra are strongly reflection dominated, and do not provide a good fit to Suzaku spectral data of the source. The inconsistency of this result with some previous claims can be traced to our using data in a broader energy band, where effects of warm absorber in the spectrum cannot be neglected.
  • The wide-band Suzaku spectra of the black hole binary GX 339-4, acquired in 2007 February during the Very High state, were reanalyzed. Effects of event pileup (significant within ~ 3' of the image center) and telemetry saturation of the XIS data were carefully considered. The source was detected up to ~ 300$ keV, with an unabsorbed 0.5--200 keV luminosity of ~3.8 10^{38} erg/s at 8 kpc. The spectrum can be approximated by a power-law of photon index 2.7, with a mild soft excess and a hard X-ray hump. When using the XIS data outside 2' of the image center, the Fe-K line appeared extremely broad, suggesting a high black hole spin as already reported by Miller et al. (2008) based on the Suzaku data and other CCD data. When the XIS data accumulation is further limited to >3' to avoid event pileup, the Fe-K profile becomes narrower, and there appears a marginally better solution that suggests the inner disk radius to be 5-14 times the gravitational radius (1-sigma), though a maximally spinning black hole is still allowed by the data at the 90% confidence level. Consistently, the optically-thick accretion disk is inferred to be truncated at a radius 5-32 times the gravitational radius. Thus, the Suzaku data allow an alternative explanation without invoking a rapidly spinning black hole. This inference is further supported by the disk radius measured previously in the High/Soft state.
  • The broad-band 1-300 keV Suzaku spectrum of IGR J17497-2821, the X-ray transient discovered by INTEGRAL in September 2006, is presented. Suzaku observed IGR J17497-2821 on September 25, eight days after its discovery, for a net exposure of about 53 ksec. During the Suzaku observation, IGR J17497-2821 is very bright, 2 x 10^37 erg/s at 8 kpc in the 1-300 keV range, and shows a hard spectrum, typical of black hole candidates in the low-hard state. Despite the multi-mission X-ray monitoring of the source, only with Suzaku is it possible to obtain a broad-band spectrum in the 1-300 keV range with a very high signal to noise ratio. A sum of a multi-color disc (DISKBB) and a thermal Comptonization component (COMPPS) with mild reflection is a good representation of our IGR J17497-2821 Suzaku spectrum. The spectral properties of the accretion disc as well as the cut-off energy in the spectrum at about 150 keV are clearly detected and constrained. We discuss the implications on the physical model used to interpret the data and the comparison with previous results.
  • We report the detection of a transient X-ray source toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) onboard the Suzaku telescope. The source was detected at the edge of the XIS image during a routine observation of the calibration source 1E 0102.2-7219, a supernova remnant in the SMC. We constrained the source position using ray-tracing simulations. No such transient source was found at the position in the other Suzaku observations nor in all the available archived images of other X-ray missions for the last ~28 years. The XIS spectrum can be explained by a single blackbody with a temperature of ~72 eV, and an interstellar extinction of ~4.9x10^{20} H atoms cm^{-2} consistent with the value to the SMC. An additional absorption edge at ~0.74 keV was also confirmed, which is presumably due to the absorption by helium-like oxygen ions. Assuming that the source is at the distance of the SMC, the X-ray luminosity in the 0.2-2.0 keV band is ~10^{37} erg s^{-1} and the radius of the source is ~10^{8} cm. The XIS light curve shows about a two-fold decline in X-ray flux during the 24 ks observation. Together with the archived data, the X-ray flux in the burst is at least three orders of magnitude brighter than the undetected quiescent level. All these properties are often seen among supersoft sources (SSSs). We conclude that the transient source is another example of SSS in the SMC.
  • We report on a Chandra grating observation of the recently discovered hard X-ray transient IGR J17497-2821. The observation took place about two weeks after the source discovery at a flux level of about 20 mCrab in the 0.8-8 keV range. We extracted the most precise X-ray position of IGR J17497-2821, RA=17 49 38.037, DEC= -28 21 17.37 (90% uncertainty of 0.6"). We also report on optical and near infra-red photometric follow-up observations based on this position. With the multi-wavelength information at hand, we discuss the possible nature of the source proposing that IGR J17497-2821 is a low-mass X-ray binary, most likely hosting a black hole, with a red giant K-type companion.
  • Two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in the nearby Sb galaxy NGC 1313, named X-1 and X-2, were observed with Suzaku on 2005 September 15. During the observation for a net exposure of 28~ks (but over a gross time span of 90~ks), both objects varied in intensity by about 50~%. The 0.4--10 keV X-ray luminosity of X-1 and X-2 was measured as $2.5 \times 10^{40}~{\rm erg~s^{-1}}$ and $5.8 \times 10^{39}~{\rm erg~s^{-1}}$, respectively, with the former the highest ever reported for this ULX. The spectrum of X-1 can be explained by a sum of a strong and variable power-law component with a high energy cutoff, and a stable multicolor blackbody with an innermost disk temperature of $\sim 0.2$ keV. These results suggest that X-1 was in a ``very high'' state, where the disk emission is strongly Comptonized. The absorber within NGC 1313 toward X-1 is suggested to have a subsolar oxygen abundance. The spectrum of X-2 is best represented, in its fainter phase, by a multicolor blackbody model with the innermost disk temperature of 1.2--1.3 keV, and becomes flatter as the source becomes brighter. Hence X-2 is interpreted to be in a slim-disk state. These results suggest that the two ULXs have black hole masses of a few tens to a few hundreds solar masses.
  • We have developed a framework for the Monte-Carlo simulation of the X-Ray Telescopes (XRT) and the X-ray Imaging Spectrometers (XIS) onboard Suzaku, mainly for the scientific analysis of spatially and spectroscopically complex celestial sources. A photon-by-photon instrumental simulator is built on the ANL platform, which has been successfully used in ASCA data analysis. The simulator has a modular structure, in which the XRT simulation is based on a ray-tracing library, while the XIS simulation utilizes a spectral "Redistribution Matrix File" (RMF), generated separately by other tools. Instrumental characteristics and calibration results, e.g., XRT geometry, reflectivity, mutual alignments, thermal shield transmission, build-up of the contamination on the XIS optical blocking filters (OBF), are incorporated as completely as possible. Most of this information is available in the form of the FITS (Flexible Image Transport System) files in the standard calibration database (CALDB). This simulator can also be utilized to generate an "Ancillary Response File" (ARF), which describes the XRT response and the amount of OBF contamination. The ARF is dependent on the spatial distribution of the celestial target and the photon accumulation region on the detector, as well as observing conditions such as the observation date and satellite attitude. We describe principles of the simulator and the ARF generator, and demonstrate their performance in comparison with in-flight data.
  • We report on observations of the X-ray pulsar IGR J16320-4751 (a.k.a. AX J1631.9-4752) performed simultaneously with INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton. We refine the source position and identify the most likely infrared counterpart. Our simultaneous coverage allows us to confirm the presence of X-ray pulsations at ~1300 s, that we detect above 20 keV with INTEGRAL for the first time. The pulse fraction is consistent with being constant with energy, which is compatible with a model of polar accretion by a pulsar. We study the spectral properties of IGR J16320-4751 during two major periods occurring during the simultaneous coverage with both satellites, namely a flare and a non-flare period. We detect the presence of a narrow 6.4 keV iron line in both periods. The presence of such a feature is typical of supergiant wind accretors such as Vela X-1 or GX 301-2. We inspect the spectral variations with respect to the pulse phase during the non-flare period, and show that the pulse is solely due to variations of the X-ray flux emitted by the source and not to variations of the spectral parameters. Our results are therefore compatible with the source being a pulsar in a High Mass X-ray Binary. We detect a soft excess appearing in the spectra as a blackbody with a temperature of ~0.07 keV. We discuss the origin of the X-ray emission in IGR J16320-4751: while the hard X-rays are likely the result of Compton emission produced in the close vicinity of the pulsar, based on energy argument we suggest that the soft excess is likely the emission by a collisionally energised cloud in which the compact object is embedded.
  • We report on an observation of the recently discovered accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J00291+5934 performed with the RXTE-Proportional Counter Array (PCA) and Chandra-High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS). The RXTE data are from a two week follow-up of the source while the Chandra observation took place around the end of the follow-up, about 12 days after the discovery of the source, when the source flux had decreased already by a factor of ten. The analysis of the Chandra data allowed us to extract the most precise X-ray position of IGR J00291+5934, RA=00 29 03.08 and Dec=+59 34 19.2 (0.6sec error), compatible with the optical and radio ones. We find that the spectra of IGR J00291+5934 can be described by a combination of a thermal component and a power-law. Along the outburst detected by PCA, the power-law photon index shows no particular trend while the thermal component (~1 keV, interpreted as a hot spot on the neutron star surface) becomes weaker until non-detection. In the simultaneous observation of the weak Chandra/RXTE spectrum, there is no more indication for the ~1 keV thermal component while we detect a colder thermal component (~0.4 keV) that we interpret as the emission from the cold disc. A hint for a 6.4 keV iron line is detected, together with an excess around 6.8 keV and absorption feature around 7.1 keV. The latter two features have never been detected in the spectra of accretion-driven millisecond pulsars before and, if confirmed, would suggest the presence of an expanding hot corona with high outflow velocities.
  • We present the study of one year of INTEGRAL data on the neutron star low mass X-ray binary GX 5-1. Thanks to the excellent angular resolution and sensitivity of INTEGRAL, we are able to obtain a high quality spectrum of GX 5-1 from ~5 keV to ~100 keV, for the first time without contamination from the nearby black hole candidate GRS 1758-258 above 20 keV. During our observations, GX 5-1 is mostly found in the horizontal and normal branch of its hardness intensity diagram. A clear hard X-ray emission is observed above ~30 keV which exceeds the exponential cut-off spectrum expected from lower energies. This spectral flattening may have the same origin of the hard components observed in other Z sources as it shares the property of being characteristic to the horizontal branch. The hard excess is explained by introducing Compton up-scattering of soft photons from the neutron star surface due to a thin hot plasma expected in the boundary layer. The spectral changes of GX 5-1 downward along the "Z" pattern in the hardness intensity diagram can be well described in terms of monotonical decrease of the neutron star surface temperature. This may be a consequence of the gradual expansion of the boundary layer as the mass accretion rate increases.
  • Using the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer Imaging array (ACIS-I), we have carried out a deep hard X-ray observation of the Galactic plane region at (l,b) ~ (28.5, 0.0), where no discrete X-ray source had been reported previously. We have detected 274 new point X-ray sources (4 sigma confidence) as well as strong Galactic diffuse emission within two partially overlapping ACIS-I fields (~250 arcmin^2in total). Sum of all the detected point source fluxes accounts for only ~ 10 % of the total X-ray flux in the field of view. Even hypothesizing a new population of much dimmer and numerous Galactic point sources, the total observed X-ray flux cannot be explained. Therefore, we conclude that X-ray emission from the Galactic plane has truly diffuse origin. Only 26 point sources were detected both in the soft and hard bands, indicating that there are two distinct classes of the X-ray sources distinguished by the spectral hardness ratio. Surface number density of the hard sources is only slightly higher than that measured at the high Galactic latitude regions, indicating that majority of the hard sources are background AGNs. Following up the Chandra observation, we have performed a near-infrared (NIR) survey with SOFI at ESO/NTT. Almost all the soft X-ray sources have been identified in NIR and their spectral types are consistent with main-sequence stars, suggesting most of them are nearby X-ray active stars. On the other hand, only 22 % of the hard sources had NIR counterparts, which are presumably Galactic. From X-ray and NIR spectral study, they are most likely to be quiescent cataclysmic variables. We have also carried out a precise spectral study of the Galactic diffuse X-ray emission excluding the point sources.
  • A comparative XMM-Newton archival data spectral study of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M33 X-8 has been performed by using both the standard disk model and the newly developed slim disk models. The results of this analysis tend to confirm the hypothesis that M33 X-8 is an X-ray binary with a stellar-mass black hole accreting at super-Eddington rate.
  • We report the discovery of a high-energy transient with the IBIS/ISGRI detector on board the INTEGRAL observatory. The source, namely IGR J00291+5934, was first detected on 2nd December 2004 in the routine monitoring of the IBIS/ISGRI 20--60 keV images. The observations were conducted during Galactic Plane Scans, which are a key part of the INTEGRAL Core Programme observations. After verifying the basic source behaviour, the discovery was announced on 3rd December. The transient shows a hard Comptonised spectrum, with peak energy release at about 20 keV and a total luminosity of ~ 0.9E36 erg/s in the 5--100 keV range, assuming a distance of 3 kpc. Following the INTEGRAL announcement of the discovery of IGR J00291+5934, a number of observations were made by other instruments. We summarise the results of those observations and, together with the INTEGRAL data, identifiy IGR J00291+5934 as the 6th member of a class of accreting X-ray millisecond pulsars.
  • We present the preliminary results of the observational campaign performed in 2003 to study the Galactic Nucleus with INTEGRAL. The mosaicked images obtained with the IBIS/ISGRI coded aperture instrument in the energy range above 20 keV, give a yet unseen view of the high-energy sources of this region in hard X and gamma-rays, with an angular resolution of 12'. We report on the discovery of a source, IGR J17456-2901, compatible with the instrument's point spread function and coincident with the Galactic Nucleus Sgr A* to within 0.9'. The source is visible up to 60-80 keV with a 20-100 keV luminosity at 8 kpc of 3 x 10E35 erg/s. Although we cannot unequivocally associate the new INTEGRAL source to the Galactic Nucleus, this is the first report of significant hard X-ray emission from within the inner 10' of the Galaxy and a contribution from the galactic center supermassive black hole itself cannot be excluded. Here we discuss the results obtained and the perspectives for future observations of the Galactic Nucleus with INTEGRAL and other observatories
  • Using the Chandra ACIS-I instruments, we have carried out a deep X-ray observation on the Galactic plane region at (l,b) ~ (28.5, 0.0), where no discrete X-ray sources have been known previously. We have detected, as well as strong diffuse emission, 274 new point X-ray sources (4 sigma confidence) within two partially overlapping fields (~250 arcmin^2 in total) down to the flux limit ~3 x 10^{-15} $ erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} (2 -- 10 keV) and ~ 7 x 10^{-16} erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} (0.5 -- 2 keV). We clearly resolved point sources and the Galactic diffuse emission, and found that ~ 90 % of the flux observed in our field of view originates from diffuse emission. Many point sources are detected either in the soft X-ray band (below 2 keV) or in the hard band (above 2 keV), and only a small number of sources are detected in both energy bands. On the other hand, most soft X-ray sources are considered to be nearby X-ray active stars. We have carried out a follow-up near-infrared (NIR) observation using SOFI at ESO/NTT. Most of the soft X-ray sources were identified, whereas only a small number of hard X-ray sources had counterparts in NIR. Using both X-ray and NIR information, we can efficiently classify the point X-ray sources detected in the Galactic plane. We conclude that most of the hard X-ray sources are background Active Galactic Nuclei seen through the Milky Way, whereas majority of the soft X-ray sources are nearby X-ray active stars.
  • Our collaboration is responsible for the study of a sample of 72 low mass X-ray binaries (LMXRB) using the INTEGRAL Core Programme data. In this paper we describe the monitoring programme we have started and the current variability and spectral results on a sample of 8 persistently bright LMXRBs hosting a neutron star (Z and Atoll sources). Current results show that among our sample of sources there seems to be no important difference in the variability of Z sources with respect to Atolls and the first colour-colour and hardness intensity diagrams built in the "traditional" energy bands display the expected patterns. Z sources seem to be harder than the bright Atolls of our sample (above 20 keV) and present no evident cut-off until about 50 keV. A hint of a non-thermal hard tail is seen in Sco X-1 with ISGRI and SPI, similarly to what was previously detected by D'Amico et al. (2001) with RXTE. These results, even if preliminary, show the importance of such a programme and the potential underlying it to understand these sources as a class.
  • The INTEGRAL Science Data Centre (ISDC) routinely monitors the Near Real Time data (NRT) from the INTEGRAL satellite. A first scientific analysis is made in order to check for the detection of new, transient or highly variable sources in the data. Of primary importance for this work is the Interactive Quick Look Analysis (IQLA), which produces JEM-X and ISGRI images and monitors them for interesting astrophysical events
  • We present the first INTEGRAL results on Cyg X-3 from the PV phase observations of the Cygnus region. The source was clearly detected by the JEM-X, ISGRI and SPI detectors. The INTEGRAL observations were supported by simultaneous pointed RXTE observations. Their lightcurves folded over the 4.8 hour binary period are compatible with the mean RXTE/ASM and CGRO/BATSE light curves. We fit our broad band X-ray/Gamma-ray spectra with a physical model, which represents the first such published model for Cyg X-3. The main physical processes in the source are thermal Comptonization and Compton reflection with parameters similar to those found for black-hole binaries at high Eddington rates.
  • Early results from the INTEGRAL Core Program, for a sample of eight persistently bright neutron star low mass X-ray binaries in the energy range from 5 keV to 200 keV are presented. It is shown that INTEGRAL efficiently detects sources and that spectra may be obtained up to several hundreds of keV by combining data from three of the four INTEGRAL instruments: JEM-X, IBIS and SPI. For the source GX 17+2 it is shown that the spectrum extends well above 100 keV with a flattening of the spectrum above 30 keV. This might suggest a non-thermal comptonisation emission, but uncertainties in the current data reduction and background determination do not allow firm conclusions to be drawn.
  • We review highlights of the results obtained from recent Galactic X-ray survey observations, in particular ASCA Galactic center and plane survey and our Chandra deep survey on the (l,b)=(28.5,0) region. Strong hard X-ray diffuse components are observed from Galactic ridge, center and bulge, and they have both thermal and non-thermal spectral components. Dozens of discrete and extended sources have been discovered on the Galactic plane, which also indicate thermal and/or non-thermal X-ray energy spectra. They are often associated with radio sources and are considered to be SNR candidates. Most of the hard X-ray point sources in the outer part of the Galactic plane are considered to be background AGNs, while fraction of the Galactic hard X-ray sources (such as quiescent dwarf novae) increases toward the Galactic center. Most of the soft X-ray sources on the Galactic plane are presumably nearby active stars.
  • We present the results from a multiwavelength campaign of GRS 1915+105 performed from 2000 April 16 to 25. This is one of the largest coordinated set of observations ever performed for this source, covering the wide energy band in radio (13.3-0.3 cm), near-infrared (J-H-K), X-rays and Gamma-rays (from 1 keV to 10 MeV). During the campaign GRS 1915+105 was predominantly in the "plateau" (or low/hard) state but sometimes showed soft X-ray oscillations: before April 20.3, rapid, quasi-periodic (~= 45 min) flare-dip cycles were observed. The radio flares observed on April 17 shows frequency- dependent peak delay, consistent with an expansion of synchrotron-emitting region starting at the transition from the hard-dip to the soft-flare states in X-rays. On the other hand, infrared flares on April 20 appear to follow (or precede) the beginning of X-ray oscillations with an inconstant time delay of ~= 5-30 min. This implies that the infrared emitting region is located far from the black hole by >~ 10E13 cm, while its size is <~ 10E12 cm constrained from the time variability. We find a good correlation between the quasi-steady flux level in the near-infrared band and in the X-ray band. From this we estimate that the reprocessing of X-rays, probably occurring in the outer parts of the accretion disk, accounts for about 20-30% of the observed K magnitude in the plateau state. The OSSE spectrum in the 0.05-10 MeV band is represented by a single power law with a photon index of 3.1 extending to ~1 MeV with no cutoff. The power-law slope above ~30 keV is found to be very similar between different states in spite of large flux variations in soft X-rays, implying that the electron energy distribution is not affected by the change of the state in the accretion disk.
  • Using the Chandra ACIS-I instruments, we have carried out the deepest X-ray observation on a typical Galactic plane region at l 28.5 deg, where no discrete X-ray sources have been known previously. We have detected, as well as strong diffuse emission, 275 new point X-ray sources (4 sigma confidence) within two partially overlapping fields (~250 arcmin^2 in total) down to ~3 x 10^{-15} erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} (2 -- 10 keV) or ~ 7 x 10^{-16} erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} (0.5 -- 2 keV). We have studied spectral distribution of these point sources, and found that very soft sources detected only below ~ 3 keV are more numerous than hard sources detected only above ~ 3 keV. Only small number of sources are detected both in the soft and hard bands. Surface density of the hard sources is almost consistent with that at high Galactic regions, thus most of the hard sources are considered to be Active Galactic Nuclei seen through the milky way. On the other hand, some of the bright hard X-ray sources which show extremely flat spectra and iron line or edge features are considered to be Galactic, presumably quiescent dwarf novae. The soft sources show thermal spectra and small interstellar hydrogen column densities, and some of them exhibit X-ray flares. Therefore, most of the soft sources are probably X-ray active nearby late type stars.