• Twisted magnetic flux ropes are ubiquitous in space and laboratory plasmas, and the merging of such flux ropes through magnetic reconnection is an important mechanism for restructuring magnetic fields and releasing free magnetic energy. The merging-compression scenario is one possible start up scheme for spherical tokamaks, which has been used on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak MAST. Two current-carrying plasma rings, or flux ropes, approach each other through the mutual attraction of their like currents, and merge, through magnetic reconnection, into a single plasma torus, with substantial plasma heating. 2D resistive MHD and Hall MHD simulations of this process are reported, and new results for the temperature distribution of ions and electrons are presented. A model of the based on relaxation theory is also described, which is now extended to tight aspect ratio geometry. This model allows prediction of the final merged state and the heating. The implications of the relaxation model for heating of the solar corona are also discussed, and a model of the merger of two or more twisted coronal flux ropes is presented, allowing for different senses of twist.
  • The results of a comprehensive investigation into the effects of toroidicity-induced Alfv\'{e}n eigenmodes (TAE) and energetic particle modes on the NBI-generated fast-ion population in MAST plasmas are reported. Fast-ion redistribution due to frequency-chirping TAE in the range 50 kHz to 100 kHz, and frequency-chirping energetic particle modes known as fishbones in the range 20 kHz to 50 kHz, is observed. TAE and fishbones are also observed to cause losses of fast ions from the plasma. The spatial and temporal evolution of the fast-ion distribution is determined using a fission chamber, a radially-scanning collimated neutron flux monitor, a fast-ion deuterium alpha spectrometer and a charged fusion product detector. Modelling using the global transport analysis code TRANSP, with ad hoc anomalous diffusion and fishbone loss models introduced, reproduces the coarsest features of the affected fast-ion distribution in the presence of energetic-particle-driven modes. The spectrally and spatially resolved measurements show however that these models do not fully capture the effects of chirping modes on the fast-ion distribution.
  • In the merging-compression method of plasma start-up, two flux-ropes with parallel toroidal current are formed around in-vessel poloidal field coils, before merging to form a spherical tokamak plasma. This start-up method, used in the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST), is studied as a high Lundquist number and low plasma-beta magnetic reconnection experiment. In this paper, 2D fluid simulations are presented of this merging process in order to understand the underlying physics, and better interpret the experimental data. These simulations examine the individual and combined effects of tight-aspect ratio geometry and two-fluid physics on the merging. The ideal self-driven flux-rope dynamics are coupled to the diffusion layer physics, resulting in a large range of phenomena. For resistive MHD simulations, the flux-ropes enter the sloshing regime for normalised resistivity eta < 1E-5. In Hall-MHD three regimes are found for the qualitative behaviour of the current sheet, depending on the ratio of the current sheet width to the ion-sound radius. These are a stable collisional regime, an open X-point regime, and an intermediate regime that is highly unstable to tearing-type instabilities. In toroidal axisymmetric geometry, the final state after merging is a MAST-like spherical tokamak with nested flux-surfaces. It is also shown that the evolution of simulated 1D radial density profiles closely resembles the Thomson scattering electron density measurements in MAST. An intuitive explanation for the origin of the measured density structures is proposed, based upon the results of the toroidal Hall-MHD simulations.
  • Using the recently-installed Fast-Ion Deuterium Alpha (FIDA) spectrometer, the effects of low-frequency (20-50 kHz) chirping energetic particle modes with toroidal mode number n \geq 1 on the fast-ion population in MAST plasmas are considered. Results from the FIDA diagnostic are presented and discussed in the light of the present theoretical understanding of these modes, known as fishbones, in plasmas with reversed shear. Measurements of the fast-ion population reveal strong redistribution of fast ions in both real and velocity space as a result of the fishbones. Time-resolved measurements throughout the evolution of a fishbone show radial redistribution of fast ions with energies up to 95% of the primary beam injection energy. Correlations between changes in the FIDA signal and the peak time derivative of the magnetic field perturbation are observed in a limited range of operating scenarios. The transient reduction in signal caused by a fishbone may in some cases reach 50% of the signal intensity before mode onset.
  • A new global two-fluid electromagnetic turbulence code, CENTORI, has been developed for the purpose of studying magnetically-confined fusion plasmas on energy confinement timescales. This code is used to evolve the combined system of electron and ion fluid equations and Maxwell equations in toroidal configurations with axisymmetric equilibria. Uniquely, the equilibrium is co-evolved with the turbulence, and is thus modified by it. CENTORI is applicable to tokamaks of arbitrary aspect ratio and high plasma beta. A predictor-corrector, semi-implicit finite difference scheme is used to compute the time evolution of fluid quantities and fields. Vector operations and the evaluation of flux surface averages are speeded up by choosing the Jacobian of the transformation from laboratory to plasma coordinates to be a function of the equilibrium poloidal magnetic flux. A subroutine, GRASS, is used to co-evolve the plasma equilibrium by computing the steady-state solutions of a diffusion equation with a pseudo-time derivative. The code is written in Fortran 95 and is efficiently parallelized using Message Passing Interface (MPI). Illustrative examples of output from simulations of a tearing mode in a large aspect ratio tokamak plasma and of turbulence in an elongated conventional aspect ratio tokamak plasma are provided.
  • The highly dynamical, complex nature of the solar atmosphere naturally implies the presence of waves in a topologically varied magnetic environment. Here, the interaction of waves with topological features such as null points is inevitable and potentially important for energetics. The low resistivity of the solar coronal plasma implies that non-MHD effects should be considered in studies of magnetic energy release in this environment. This paper investigates the role of the Hall term in the propagation and dissipation of waves, their interaction with 2D magnetic X-points and the nature of the resulting reconnection. A Lagrangian remap shock-capturing code (Lare2d) is used to study the evolution of an initial fast magnetoacoustic wave annulus for a range of values of the ion skin depth in resistive Hall MHD. A magnetic null-point finding algorithm is also used to locate and track the evolution of the multiple null-points that are formed in the system. Depending on the ratio of ion skin depth to system size, our model demonstrates that Hall effects can play a key role in the wave-null interaction. In particular, the initial fast-wave pulse now consists of whistler and ion-cyclotron components; the dispersive nature of the whistler wave leads to (i) earlier interaction with the null, (ii) the creation of multiple additional, transient nulls and, hence, an increased number of energy release sites. In the Hall regime, the relevant timescales (such as the onset of reconnection and the period of the oscillatory relaxation) of the system are reduced significantly, and the reconnection rate is enhanced.
  • The collisional dynamics of test impurity ions in spherical tokamak plasmas with strongly-sheared radial electric fields is investigated by means of a test particle full orbit simulation code. The strength of the shear is such that the standard drift ordering can no longer be assumed and a full orbit approach is required. The effect of radial electric field shear on neoclassical particle transport is quantified for a range of test particle mass and charge numbers and electric field parameters. It is shown that the effect of a sheared electric field is to enhance the confinement of impurity species above the level observed in the absence of such a field. The effect may be explained in terms of a collisional drag force drift, which is proportional to particle charge number but independent of particle mass. This drift acts inwards for negative radial electric fields and outwards for positive fields, implying strongly enhanced confinement of highly ionized impurity ions in the presence of a negative radial electric field.
  • Aims. To determine the effect of the Hall term in the generalised Ohm's law on the damping and phase mixing of Alfven waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in uniform and non-uniform equilibrium plasmas. Methods. Wave damping in a uniform plasma is treated analytically, whilst a Lagrangian remap code (Lare2d) is used to study Hall effects on damping and phase mixing in the presence of an equilibrium density gradient. Results. The magnetic energy associated with an initially Gaussian field perturbation in a uniform resistive plasma is shown to decay algebraically at a rate that is unaffected by the Hall term to leading order in k^2di^2 where k is wavenumber and di is ion skin depth. A similar algebraic decay law applies to whistler perturbations in the limit k^2di^2>>1. In a non-uniform plasma it is found that the spatially-integrated damping rate due to phase mixing is lower in Hall MHD than it is in MHD, but the reduction in the damping rate, which can be attributed to the effects of wave dispersion, tends to zero in both the weak and strong phase mixing limits.
  • The evolution of non-potential perturbations to a current-free magnetic X-point configuration is studied, taking into account electron inertial effects as well as resistivity. Electron inertia is shown to have a negligible effect on the evolution of the system whenever the collisionless skin depth is less than the resistive scale length. Non-potential magnetic field energy in this resistive MHD limit initially reaches equipartition with flow energy, in accordance with ideal MHD, and is then dissipated extremely rapidly, on an Alfvenic timescale that is essentially independent of Lundquist number. In agreement with resistive MHD results obtained by previous authors, the magnetic field energy and kinetic energy are then observed to decay on a longer timescale and exhibit oscillatory behavior, reflecting the existence of discrete normal modes with finite real frequency. When the collisionless skin depth exceeds the resistive scale length, the system again evolves initially according to ideal MHD. At the end of this ideal phase, the field energy decays typically on an Alfvenic timescale, while the kinetic energy (which is equally partitioned between ions and electrons in this case) is dissipated on the electron collision timescale. The oscillatory decay in the energy observed in the resistive case is absent, but short wavelength structures appear in the field and velocity profiles, suggesting the possibility of particle acceleration in oppositely-directed current channels. The model provides a possible framework for interpreting observations of energy release and particle acceleration on timescales down to less than a second in the impulsive phase of solar flares.
  • An explicitly energy-conserving full orbit code CUEBIT, developed originally to describe energetic particle effects in laboratory fusion experiments, has been applied to the problem of proton acceleration in solar flares. The model fields are obtained from solutions of the linearised MHD equations for reconnecting modes at an X-type neutral point, with the additional ingredient of a longitudinal magnetic field component. To accelerate protons to the highest observed energies on flare timescales, it is necessary to invoke anomalous resistivity in the MHD solution. It is shown that the addition of a longitudinal field component greatly increases the efficiency of ion acceleration, essentially because it greatly reduces the magnitude of drift motions away from the vicinity of the X-point, where the accelerating component of the electric field is largest. Using plasma parameters consistent with flare observations, we obtain proton distributions extending up to gamma-ray-emitting energies (>1MeV). In some cases the energy distributions exhibit a bump-on-tail in the MeV range. In general, the shape of the distribution is sensitive to the model parameters.
  • Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and two-fluid quasi-neutral equilibria with azimuthal symmetry, gravity and arbitrary ratios of (nonrelativistic) flow speed to acoustic and Alfven speeds are investigated. In the two-fluid case, the mass ratio of the two species is arbitrary, and the analysis is therefore applicable to electron-positron plasmas. The methods of derivation can be extended in an obvious manner to several charged species. Generalized Grad-Shafranov equations, describing the equilibrium magnetic field, are derived. Flux function equations and Bernoulli relations for each species, together with Poisson's equation for the gravitational potential, complete the set of equations required to determine the equilibrium. These are straightforward to solve numerically. The two-fluid system, unlike the MHD system, is shown to be free of singularities. It is demonstrated analytically that there exists a class of incompressible MHD equilibria with magnetic field-aligned flow. A special sub--class first identified by S. Chandrasekhar, in which the flow speed is everywhere equal to the local Alfven speed, is compatible with virtually any azimuthally symmetric magnetic configuration. Potential applications of this analysis include extragalactic and stellar jets, and accretion disks.
  • Observations of synchrotron radiation across a wide range of wavelengths provide clear evidence that electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies in supernova remnants (SNRs). However, a viable mechanism for the pre-acceleration of such electrons to mildly relativistic energies has not yet been established. In this paper an electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code is used to simulate acceleration of electrons from background energies to tens of keV at perpendicular collisionless shocks associated with SNRs. Free energy for electron energization is provided by ions reflected from the shock front, with speeds greater than the upstream electron thermal speed. The PIC simulation results contain several new features, including: the acceleration, rather than heating, of electrons via the Buneman instability; the acceleration of electrons to speeds exceeding those of the shock-reflected ions producing the instability; and strong acceleration of electrons perpendicular to the magnetic field. Electron energization takes place through a variety of resonant and non-resonant processes, of which the strongest involves stochastic wave-particle interactions. In SNRs the diffusive shock process could then supply the final step required for the production of fully relativistic electrons. The mechanisms identified in this paper thus provide a possible solution to the electron pre-acceleration problem.