• We conducted radio-interferometric observations of the well known binary cataclysmic system AM Herculis. This particular system is formed by the magnetic white dwarf (primary) and the red dwarf (secondary), and is the prototype of so-called polars. Our observations were conducted with the European VLBI Network (EVN) in the e-EVN mode at 5 GHz. We obtained six astrometric measurements spanning one year, which make it possible to update the annual parallax for this system with the best precision to date ($\pi=11.29\pm0.08$ mas), equivalent to the distance of $88.6\pm0.6$ pc. The system was observed mostly in the quiescent phase (visual magnitude $m_v\sim15.3$), when the radio emission was at the level of about $300~\mu$Jy. Our analysis suggests that the radio flux of AM Herculis is modulated with the orbital motion. Such specific properties of the radiation can be explained using the emission mechanism similar to the scenario proposed for V471 Tauri and, in general, for RS CVn type stars. In this scenario the radio emission arises near the surface of the red dwarf, where the global magnetic field strength may reach a few kG. We argue that the quiescent radio emission distinguishes AM Herculis together with AR Ursae Majoris (the second known persistent radio polar) from other polars, as the systems with a magnetized secondary star.
  • The main aim of this work is to estimate possible radio GHz emission of extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs and to check if such radiation can be detected by Very Large Baseline Interferometers (VLBI). In the estimation we assume that the emission may originate in processes similar to those observed in the Jupiter system. The frequency of the radio emission that is produced in this system depends mostly on the magnetic field strength. Jupiter's magnetic field ($\sim 9$ G on average) allows for radiation from kHz frequencies up to 40 MHz. This is well below the frequency range of VLBI. However, it was demonstrated that the magnetic field strength in massive and young object may be up to two orders of magnitude higher than for Jupiter, which is especially relevant for planets around short-lived A type stars. This should extend the range of the emission up to GHz frequencies. We calculated expected flux densities of radio emission for a variety of hypothetical young planetary systems. We analysed two different emission scenarios, and found that the radiation induced by moons (process similar to Jupiter-Io interactions) appears to be less efficient than the emission generated by a stellar wind on a planetary magnetosphere. We also estimated hypothetical emission of planets and brown dwarfs located around relatively young and massive main sequence A-type stars. Our results show that the emission produced by stellar winds could be detected by currently operating VLBI networks.
  • We study the mid-egress eclipse timing data gathered for the cataclysmic binary HU Aquarii during the years 1993-2014. The (O-C) residuals were previously attributed to a single ~7 Jupiter mass companion in ~5 au orbit or to a stable 2-planet system with an unconstrained outermost orbit. We present 22 new observations gathered between June, 2011 and July, 2014 with four instruments around the world. They reveal a systematic deviation of ~60 - 120 seconds from the older ephemeris. We re-analyse the whole set of the timing data available. Our results provide an erratum to the previous HU Aqr planetary models, indicating that the hypothesis for a third and fourth body in this system is uncertain. The dynamical stability criterion and a particular geometry of orbits rule out coplanar 2-planet configurations. A putative HU Aqr planetary system may be more complex, e.g., highly non-coplanar. Indeed, we found examples of 3-planet configurations with the middle planet in a retrograde orbit, which are stable for at least 1Gyr, and consistent with the observations. The (O-C) may be also driven by oscillations of the gravitational quadrupole moment of the secondary, as predicted by the Lanza et al. modification of the Applegate mechanism. Further systematic, long-term monitoring of HU Aqr is required to interpret the (O-C) residuals.
  • The transiting planet WASP-12 b was identified as a potential target for transit timing studies because a departure from a linear ephemeris was reported in the literature. Such deviations could be caused by an additional planet in the system. We attempt to confirm the existence of claimed variations in transit timing and interpret its origin. We organised a multi-site campaign to observe transits by WASP-12 b in three observing seasons, using 0.5-2.6-metre telescopes. We obtained 61 transit light curves, many of them with sub-millimagnitude precision. The simultaneous analysis of the best-quality datasets allowed us to obtain refined system parameters, which agree with values reported in previous studies. The residuals versus a linear ephemeris reveal a possible periodic signal that may be approximated by a sinusoid with an amplitude of 0.00068+/-0.00013 d and period of 500+/-20 orbital periods of WASP-12 b. The joint analysis of timing data and published radial velocity measurements results in a two-planet model which better explains observations than single-planet scenarios. We hypothesize that WASP-12 b might be not the only planet in the system and there might be the additional 0.1 M_Jup body on a 3.6-d eccentric orbit. A dynamical analysis indicates that the proposed two-planet system is stable over long timescales.
  • Two observational campaigns were carried out during the eclipses of EE Cep in 2003 and 2008/9 to verify whether the eclipsing body in the system is indeed a dark disk and to understand the observed changes in the depth and durations of the eclipses. Multicolour photometric data and spectroscopic observations at both low and high resolution were collected. We numerically modelled the variations in brightness and colour during the eclipses. We tested models with different disk structure. We considered the possibility of disk precession. The complete set of observational data collected during the last three eclipses are made available to the astronomical community. Two blue maxima in the colour indices were detected during these two eclipses, one before and one after the photometric minimum. The first (stronger) blue maximum is simultaneous with a "bump" that is very clear in all the UBVRI light curves. Variations in the spectral line profiles seem to be recurrent during each cycle. NaI lines always show at least three absorption components during the eclipse minimum and strong absorption is superimposed on the H_alpha emission. These observations confirm that the eclipsing object in EE Cep system is indeed a dark, dusty disk around a low luminosity object. The primary appears to be a rapidly rotating Be star that is strongly darkened at the equator and brightened at the poles. Some of the conclusions of this work require verification in future studies: (i) a complex, possibly multi-ring structure of the disk in EE Cep; (ii) our explanation of the "bump" observed during the last two eclipses in terms of the different times of obscuration of the hot polar regions of the Be star by the disk; and (iii) our suggested period of the disk precession (~11-12 P_orb) and predicted depth of about 2 mag the forthcoming eclipse in 2014.
  • In a recent study, Lee et al. presented new photometric follow-up timing observations of the semi-detached binary system SZ Herculis and proposed the existence of two hierarchical cirumbinary companions. Based on the light-travel time effect, the two low-mass M-dwarf companions are found to orbit the binary pair on moderate to high eccentric orbits. The derived periods of these two companions are close to a 2:1 mean-motion orbital resonance. We have studied the stability of the system using the osculating orbital elements as presented by Lee et al. Results indicate an orbit-crossing architecture exhibiting short-term dynamical instabilities leading to the escape of one of the proposed companions. We have examined the system's underlying model parameter-space by following a Monte Carlo approach and found an improved fit to the timing data. A study of the stability of our best-fitting orbits also indicates that the proposed system is generally unstable. If the observed anomalous timing variations of the binary period is due to additional circumbinary companions, then the resulting system should exhibit a long-term stable orbital configuration much different from the orbits suggested by Lee et al. We, therefore, suggest that based on Newtonian-dynamical considerations, the proposed quadruple system cannot exist. To uncover the true nature of the observed period variations of this system, we recommend future photometric follow-up observations that could further constrain eclipse-timing variations and/or refine light-travel time models.
  • More than 450 extrasolar planets are known to date. To detect these intriguing objects, many photometric and radial velocity (RV) surveys are in progress. We developed the Keplerian FITting (KFIT) code, to model published and available RV data. KFIT is based on a hybrid, quasi-global optimization technique relying on the Genetic Algorithms and simplex algorithm. Here, we re-analyse the RV data of evolved K3III star HD 240210. We confirm three equally good solutions which might be interpreted as signals of 2-planet systems. Remarkably, one of these best-fits describes the long-term stable two-planet system, involved in the 2:1~mean motion resonance (MMR). It may be the first instance of this strong MMR in a multi-planet system hosted by evolved star, as the 2:1 MMR configurations are already found around a few solar dwarfs.
  • The detailed study of the exoplanetary systems HD189733 and HD209458 has given rise to a wealth of exciting information on the physics of exoplanetary atmospheres. To further our understanding of the make-up and processes within these atmospheres we require a larger sample of bright transiting planets. We have began a project to detect more bright transiting planets in the southern hemisphere by utilising precision radial-velocity measurements. We have observed a constrained sample of bright, inactive and metal-rich stars using the HARPS instrument and here we present the current status of this project, along with our first discoveries which include a brown dwarf/extreme-Jovian exoplanet found in the brown dwarf desert region around the star HD191760 and improved orbits for three other exoplanetary systems HD48265, HD143361 and HD154672. Finally, we briefly discuss the future of this project and the current prospects we have for discovering more bright transiting planets.
  • We report the discovery of one or more planet-mass companions to the K0-giant HD 102272 with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. In the absence of any correlation of the observed periodicities with the standard indicators of stellar activity, the observed radial velocity variations are most plausibly explained in terms of a Keplerian motion of at least one planet-mass body around the star. With the estimated stellar mass of 1.9M$_\odot$, the minimum mass of the confirmed planet is 5.9M$_J$. The planet's orbit is characterized by a small but nonzero eccentricity of $e$=0.05 and the semi-major axis of 0.61 AU, which makes it the most compact one discovered so far around GK-giants. This detection adds to the existing evidence that, as predicted by theory, the minimum size of planetary orbits around intermediate-mass giants is affected by both planet formation processes and stellar evolution. The currently available evidence for another planet around HD 102272 is insufficient to obtain an unambiguous two-orbit solution.
  • We present an analysis of high precision radial velocity (RV) observations of stars hosting multi-planet systems with Jovian companions. We use dynamical stability constraints and quasi-global methods of optimization. As an illustration, we present new results derived for the RV data of the Sun-like dwarfs HD 155358 and $\tau^1$ Gruis.
  • Precision radial velocity (RV) measurements of the Sun-like dwarf 14 Herculis published by Naef et. al (2004), Butler et. al (2006) and Wittenmyer et al (2007) reveal a Jovian planet in a 1760 day orbit and a trend indicating the second distant object. On the grounds of dynamical considerations, we test a hypothesis that the trend can be explained by the presence of an additional giant planet. We derive dynamical limits to th orbital parameters of the putative outer Jovian companion in an orbit within ~13 AU. In this case, the mutual interactions between the Jovian planets are important for the long-term stability of the system. The best self-consistent and stable Newtonian fit to an edge-on configuration of Jovian planets has the outer planet in 9 AU orbit with a moderate eccentricity ~0.2 and confined to a zone spanned by the low-order mean motion resonances 5:1 and 6:1. This solution lies in a shallow minimum of \Chi and persists over a wide range of the system inclination. Other stable configurations within 1\sigma confidence interval of the best fit are possible for the semi-major axis of the outer planet in the range of (6,13) AU and the eccentricity in the range of (0,0.3). The orbital inclination cannot yet be determined but when it decreases, both planetary masses approach ~10 Jupiter masses and for ~30 deg the hierarchy of the masses is reversed.
  • The kinematic structure of a sample of planetary nebulae, consisting of 23 [WR] central stars, 21 weak emission line stars (wels) and 57 non-emission line central stars, is studied. The [WR] stars are shown to be surrounded by turbulent nebulae, a characteristic shared by some wels but almost completely absent from the non-emission line stars. The fraction of objects showing turbulence for non-emission-line stars, wels and [WR] stars is 7%, 24% and 91%, respectively. The [WR] stars show a distinct IRAS 12-micron excess, indicative of small dust grains, which is not found for wels. The [WR]-star nebulae are on average more centrally condensed than those of other stars. On the age-temperature diagram, the wels are located on tracks of both high and low stellar mass, while [WR] stars trace a narrow range of intermediate masses. Emission-line stars are not found on the cooling track. One group of wels may form a sequence wels--[WO] stars with increasing temperature. For the other groups both the wels and the [WR] stars appear to represent several, independent evolutionary tracks. We find a discontinuity in the [WR] stellar temperature distribution and suggest different evolutionary sequences above and below the temperature gap. One group of cool [WR] stars has no counterpart among any other group of PNe and may represent binary evolution. A prime factor distinguishing wels and [WR] stars appears to be stellar luminosity. We find no evidence for an increase of nebular expansion velocity with time.
  • The set of radial velocity measurements of the HD 160691 has been recently published by Jones et.al 2002 (MNRAS). It reveals a linear trend that indicates a presence of the second planet in this system. The preliminary double-Keplerian orbital fit to the observations, announced by the discovery team, describes a highly unstable, self-disrupting configuration. Because the observational window of the HD 160691 system is narrow, the orbital parameters of the hypothetical second companion are unconstrained. In this paper we try to find out whether a second giant planet can exist up to the distance of Jupiter and search for the dynamical constraints on its orbital parameters. Our analysis employs a combination of fitting algorithms and simultaneous examination of the dynamical stability of the obtained orbital fits. It reveals that if the semi-major axis of the second planet is smaller than $\simeq 5.2$ AU, the observations are consistent with quasi-periodic, regular motions of the system confined to the islands of various low-order mean motion resonances, e.g., 3:1, 7:2, 4:1, 5:1, or to their vicinity. In such cases the second planet has smaller eccentricity $\simeq 0.2-0.5$ than estimated in the previous works. We show that the currently available Doppler data rather preclude the 2:1 mean motion resonance expected by some authors to be present in the HD 160691 planetary system. We also demonstrate that the MEGNO-penalty method, developed in this paper, which is a combination of the genetic minimization algorithm and the MEGNO analysis, can be efficiently used for predicting stable planetary configurations when only a limited number of observations is given or the data do not provide tight constraints on the orbital elements.