• The sub-cycle dynamics of electrons driven by strong laser fields is central to the emerging field of attosecond science. We demonstrate how the dynamics can be probed through high-order harmonic generation, where different trajectories leading to the same harmonic order are initiated at different times, thereby probing different field strengths. We find large differences between the trajectories with respect to both their sensitivity to driving field ellipticity and resonant enhancement. To accurately describe the ellipticity dependence of the long trajectory harmonics we must include a sub-cycle change of the initial velocity distribution of the electron and its excursion time. The resonant enhancement is observed only for the long trajectory contribution of a particular harmonic when a window resonance in argon, which is off-resonant in the field-free case, is shifted into resonance due to a large dynamic Stark shift.
  • High harmonic generation (HHG) is used to measure the spectral phase of the recombination dipole matrix element (RDM) in argon over a broad frequency range that includes the 3p Cooper minimum (CM). The measured RDM phase agrees well with predictions based on the scattering phases and amplitudes of the interfering s- and d-channel contributions to the complementary photoionization process. The reconstructed attosecond bursts that underlie the HHG process show that the derivative of the RDM spectral phase, the group delay, does not have a straight-forward interpretation as an emission time, in contrast to the usual attochirp group delay. Instead, the rapid RDM phase variation caused by the CM reshapes the attosecond bursts.
  • We study the influence of phase matching on interference minima in high harmonic spectra. We concentrate on structures in atoms due to interference of different angular momentum channels during recombination. We use the Cooper minimum (CM) in argon at 47 eV as a marker in the harmonic spectrum. We measure 2d harmonic spectra in argon as a function of wavelength and angular divergence. While we identify a clear CM in the spectrum when the target gas jet is placed after the laser focus, we find that the appearance of the CM varies with angular divergence and can even be completely washed out when the gas jet is placed closer to the focus. We also show that the argon CM appears at different wavelengths in harmonic and photo-absorption spectra measured under conditions independent of any wavelength calibration. We model the experiment with a simulation based on coupled solutions of the time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation and the Maxwell wave equation, including both the single atom response and macroscopic effects of propagation. The single atom calculations confirm that the ground state of argon can be represented by its field free $p$ symmetry, despite the strong laser field used in high harmonic generation. Because of this, the CM structure in the harmonic spectrum can be described as the interference of continuum $s$ and $d$ channels, whose relative phase jumps by $\pi$ at the CM energy, resulting in a minimum shifted from the photoionization result. We also show that the full calculations reproduce the dependence of the CM on the macroscopic conditions. We calculate simple phase matching factors as a function of harmonic order and explain our experimental and theoretical observation in terms of the effect of phase matching on the shape of the harmonic spectrum. Phase matching must be taken into account to fully understand spectral features related to HHG spectroscopy.
  • We present an interferometric pump-probe technique for the characterization of attosecond electron wave packets (WPs) that uses a free WP as a reference to measure a bound WP. We demonstrate our method by exciting helium atoms using an attosecond pulse with a bandwidth centered near the ionization threshold, thus creating both a bound and a free WP simultaneously. After a variable delay, the bound WP is ionized by a few-cycle infrared laser precisely synchronized to the original attosecond pulse. By measuring the delay-dependent photoelectron spectrum we obtain an interferogram that contains both quantum beats as well as multi-path interference. Analysis of the interferogram allows us to determine the bound WP components with a spectral resolution much better than the inverse of the attosecond pulse duration.
  • We study resonant two-color two-photon ionization of Helium via the 1s3p 1P1 state. The first color is the 15th harmonic of a tunable titanium sapphire laser, while the second color is the fundamental laser radiation. Our method uses phase-locked high-order harmonics to determine the {\it phase} of the two-photon process by interferometry. The measurement of the two-photon ionization phase variation as a function of detuning from the resonance and intensity of the dressing field allows us to determine the intensity dependence of the transition energy.
  • We study experimentally the influence of the intensity of the infrared (IR) probe field on attosecond pulse train (APT) phase measurements performed with the RABITT method (Reconstruction of Attosecond Beating by Interference in Two-Photon Transitions). We find that if a strong IR field is applied, the attosecond pulses will appear to have lower-than-actual chirp rates. We also observe the onset of the streaking regime in the breakdown of the weak-field RABITT conditions. We perform a Fourier-analysis of harmonic and sideband continuum states and show that the mutual phase relation of the harmonics can be extracted from higher Fourier components.
  • The basic properties of atoms, molecules and solids are governed by electron dynamics which take place on extremely short time scales. To measure and control these dynamics therefore requires ultrafast sources of radiation combined with efficient detection techniques. The generation of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond (1 as = 10-18 s) pulses has, for the first time, made direct measurements of electron dynamics possible. Nevertheless, while various applications of attosecond pulses have been demonstrated experimentally, no one has yet captured or controlled the full three dimensional motion of an electron on an attosecond time scale. Here we demonstrate an attosecond quantum stroboscope capable of guiding and imaging electron motion on a sub-femtosecond (1 fs = 10-15 s) time scale. It is based on a sequence of identical attosecond pulses which are synchronized with a guiding laser field. The pulse to pulse separation in the train is tailored to exactly match an optical cycle of the laser field and the electron momentum distributions are detected with a velocity map imaging spectrometer (VMIS). This technique has enabled us to guide ionized electrons back to their parent ion and image the scattering event. We envision that coherent electron scattering from atoms, molecules and surfaces captured by the attosecond quantum stroboscope will complement more traditional scattering techniques since it provides high temporal as well as spatial resolution.
  • Attosecond pulses can be used to initiate and control electron dynamics on a sub-femtosecond time scale. The first step in this process occurs when an atom absorbs an ultraviolet photon leading to the formation of an attosecond electron wave packet (EWP). Until now, attosecond pulses have been used to create free EWPs in the continuum, where they quickly disperse. In this paper we use a train of attosecond pulses, synchronized to an infrared (IR) laser field, to create a series of EWPs that are below the ionization threshold in helium. We show that the ionization probability then becomes a function of the delay between the IR and attosecond fields. Calculations that reproduce the experimental results demonstrate that this ionization control results from interference between transiently bound EWPs created by different pulses in the train. In this way, we are able to observe, for the first time, wave packet interference in a strongly driven atomic system.