• Quantum spin liquids are exotic Mott insulators that carry extraordinary spin excitations and thus, when doped, expected to afford novel metallic states coupled to the unconventional magnetic excitations. The organic triangular-lattice system k-(ET)4Hg2.89Br8 is a promising candidate for the doped spin-liquid and hosts a non-Fermi liquid at low pressures. We show that, in the non-Fermi liquid regime, the charge transport confined in the layer gets deconfined sharply at low temperatures, coinciding with the entrance of spins into a quantum regime as signified by a steep decrease in spin susceptibility behaving like the triangular-lattice Heisenberg model indicative of spin-charge separation at high temperatures. This suggests a new type of non-Fermi liquid, where interlayer charge-deconfimement is associated with spin-charge entanglement.
  • We have in detail characterized the anisotropic charge response of the dimer Mott insulator $\kappa$-(BEDT-TTF)$_2$\-Cu$_2$(CN)$_3$ by dc conductivity, Hall effect and dielectric spectroscopy. At room temperature the Hall coefficient is positive and close to the value expected from stoichiometry; the temperature behavior follows the dc resistivity $\rho(T)$. Within the planes the dc conductivity is well described by variable-range hopping in two dimensions; this model, however, fails for the out-of-plane direction. An unusually broad in-plane dielectric relaxation is detected below about 60 K; it slows down much faster than the dc conductivity following an Arrhenius law. At around 17 K we can identify a pronounced dielectric anomaly concomitantly with anomalous features in the mean relaxation time and spectral broadening. The out-of-plane relaxation, on the other hand, shows a much weaker dielectric anomaly; it closely follows the temperature behavior of the respective dc resistivity. At lower temperatures, the dielectric constant becomes smaller both within and perpendicular to the planes; also the relaxation levels off. The observed behavior bears features of relaxor-like ferroelectricity. Because heterogeneities impede its long-range development, only a weak tunneling-like dynamics persists at low temperatures. We suggest that the random potential and domain structure gradually emerge due to the coupling to the anion network.
  • We report the pressure study of a doped organic superconductor with Hall coefficient and conductivity measurements. We find that maximally enhanced superconductivity and a non-Fermi liquid appear around a certain pressure where mobile carriers increase critically, suggesting a possible quantum phase transition between strongly and weakly correlated regimes. Our description extends the conventional picture of a Mott metal-insulator transition at half filling to the case of a doped Mott insulator with tunable correlation.
  • Superconductivity is a quantum phenomena arising, in its simplest form, from pairing of fermions with opposite spin into a state with zero net momentum. Whether superconductivity can occur in fermionic systems with unequal number of two species distinguished by spin, atomic hyperfine states, flavor, presents an important open question in condensed matter, cold atoms, and quantum chromodynamics, physics. In the former case the imbalance between spin-up and spin-down electrons forming the Cooper pairs is indyced by the magnetic field. Nearly fifty years ago Fulde, Ferrell, Larkin and Ovchinnikov (FFLO) proposed that such imbalanced system can lead to exotic superconductivity in which pairs acquire finite momentum. The finite pair momentum leads to spatially inhomogeneous state consisting of of a periodic alternation of "normal" and "superconducting" regions. Here, we report nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements providing microscopic evidence for the existence of this new superconducting state through the observation of spin-polarized quasiparticles forming so-called Andreev bound states.
  • The critical cooling rate $R_{\rm c}$ above which charge ordering is kinetically avoided upon cooling, which results in charge-glass formation, was investigated for the geometrically frustrated system $\theta$-(BEDT-TTF)$_2X$. X-ray diffraction experiments revealed that $\theta$-(BEDT-TTF)$_2$TlCo(SCN)$_4$ exhibits a horizontally charge-ordered state, and kinetic avoidance of this state requires rapid cooling of faster than 150 K/min. This value is markedly higher than that reported for two other isostructural $\theta$-type compounds, thus demonstrating the lower charge-glass-forming ability of $X$ $=$ TlCo(SCN)$_4$. In accounting for the systematic variations of $R_{\rm c}$ among the three $\theta$-(BEDT-TTF)$_2X$, we found that stronger charge frustration leads to superior charge-glass former. Our results suggest that charge frustration tends to slow the kinetics of charge ordering.
  • Non-equilibrium charge dynamics, such as cooling-rate-dependent charge vitrification and physical aging, have been demonstrated for a charge-cluster glass in $\theta$-(BEDT-TTF)$_2$CsZn(SCN)$_4$ using electron transport measurements. The temperature evolution of the relaxation time obeys the Arrhenius law, indicating that the glass-forming charge liquid can be classified as a "`strong" liquid in the scheme of canonical structural-glass formers. X-ray diffuse scattering further reveals that the spatial growth of charge clusters in the charge liquid is frozen below the glass transition temperature, indicating an intrinsic relationship between dynamics and structure in the charge-cluster glass.
  • Geometrically frustrated spin systems often do not exhibit long-range ordering, resulting in either quantum-mechanically disordered states, such as quantum spin liquids, or classically disordered states, such as spin ices or spin glasses. Geometric frustration may play a similar role in charge ordering, potentially leading to unconventional electronic states without long-range order; however, there are no previous experimental demonstrations of this phenomenon. Here, we show that a charge-cluster glass evolves upon cooling in the absence of long-range charge ordering for an organic conductor with a triangular lattice, theta-(BEDT-TTF)2RbZn(SCN)4. A combination of time-resolved transport measurements and x-ray diffraction reveal that the charge-liquid phase has charge clusters that fluctuate extremely slowly (<10-100 Hz) and heterogeneously. Upon further cooling, the cluster dynamics freeze, and a charge-cluster glass is formed. Surprisingly, these observations correspond to recent ideas regarding the structural glass formation of supercooled liquids, indicating that a glass-forming charge liquid relates correlated-electron physics to glass physics in soft matter.
  • We present the results of our $^{13}$C NMR study of the quasi-two-dimensional organic conductor $\theta$-(BEDT-TTF)$_2$I$_{3}$ under pressure, which is suggested to be a zero-gap conductor by transport measurements. We found that NMR spin shift is proportional to $T$ and that spin-lattice relaxation rate follows the power law $T^{\alpha}$ ($\alpha =3 \sim 4$), where $T$ is the temperature. This behavior is consistent with the cone-like band dispersion and provides microscopic evidence for the realization of the zero-gap state in the present material under pressure.
  • We investigated the magnetism under a magnetic field in the quasi-two-dimensional organic Mott insulator $\kappa$-(BEDT-TTF)$_{2}$Cu[N(CN)$_{2}$]Cl through magnetization and $^{13}$C-NMR measurements. We found that in the nominally paramagnetic phase (i.e., above N\'eel temperature) the field-induced local moments have a staggered component perpendicular to the applied field. As a result, the antiferromagnetic transition well defined at a zero field becomes crossover under a finite field. This unconventional behavior is qualitatively reproduced by the molecular-field calculation for Hamiltonian including the exchange, Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya (DM), and Zeeman interactions. This calculation also explains other unconventional magnetic features in $\kappa$-(BEDT-TTF)$_{2}$Cu[N(CN)$_{2}$]Cl reported in the literature. The present results highlight the importance of the DM interaction in field-induced magnetism in a nominally paramagnetic phase, especially in low-dimensional spin systems.
  • We present the results of a ^{1}H NMR study of the single-component molecular conductor, [Au(tmdt)_{2}]. A steep increase in the NMR line width and a peak formation of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T_{1}, were observed at around 110 K. This behavior provides clear and microscopic evidences for a magnetic phase transition at considerably high temperature among organic conductors. The observed variation in 1/T_{1} with respect to temperature indicates the highly correlated nature of the metallic phase.
  • Frequency shifts and nuclear relaxations of 13C NMR of the metal-insulator alternating material, (Me-3,5-DIP)[Ni(dmit)2]2, are presented. The NMR absorption lines originating from metallic and insulating layers are well resolved, which evidences the coexistence of localized spins (\pi_loc) and conduction \pi-electrons. The insulating layer is newly found to undergo antiferromagnetic long range order at about 2.5 K, suggesting emergence of S=1/2 Mott insulator. In the metallic layer, we found significant suppressions of static and dynamical susceptibilities of conduction electrons below 35 K, where antiferromagnetic correlation in the insulating layer evolves. We propose a dynamical effect through strong \pi-\pi_loc coupling between the metallic and insulating layers as an origin of the reduction of the density of states.
  • Changing the interactions between particles in an ensemble-by varying the temperature or pressure, for example-can lead to phase transitions whose critical behaviour depends on the collective nature of the many-body system. Despite the diversity of ingredients, which include atoms, molecules, electrons and their spins, the collective behaviour can be grouped into several families (called 'universality classes') represented by canonical spin models1. One kind of transition, the Mott transition2, occurs when the repulsive Coulomb interaction between electrons is increased, causing wave-like electrons to behave as particles. In two dimensions, the attractive behaviour responsible for the superconductivity in high-transition temperature copper oxide3,4 and organic5-7 compounds appears near the Mott transition, but the universality class to which two-dimensional, repulsive electronic systems belongs remains unknown. Here we present an observation of the critical phenomena at the pressure-induced Mott transition in a quasi-two-dimensional organic conductor using conductance measurements as a probe. We find that the Mott transition in two dimensions is not consistent with known universality classes, as the observed collective behaviour has previously not been seen. This peculiarity must be involved in any emergent behaviour near the Mott transition in two dimensions.
  • Pressure-temperature phase diagram of the organic Mott insulator $\kappa$-(ET)$_2$Cu$_2$(CN)$_3$, a model system of the spin liquid on triangular lattice, has been investigated by $^1$H NMR and resistivity measurements. The spin-liquid phase is persistent before the Mott transition to the metal or superconducting phase under pressure. At the Mott transition, the spin fluctuations are rapidly suppressed and the Fermi-liquid features are observed in the temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate and resistivity. The characteristic curvature of Mott boundary in the phase diagram highlights a crucial effect of the spin frustration on the Mott transition.
  • The direct observation of the phase separation between the metallic and insulating states of 75 %-deuterated $\kappa$-(ET)$_2$Cu[N(CN)$_2$]Br ($d33$) using infrared magneto-optical imaging spectroscopy is reported, as well as the associated temperature, cooling rate, and magnetic field dependencies of the separation. The distribution of the center of spectral weight ($< \omega >$) of $d33$ did not change under any of the conditions in which data were taken and was wider than that of the non-deuterated material. This result indicates that the inhomogenity of the sample itself is important as part of the origin of the metal - insulator phase separation.
  • We investigated the effect of magnetic field on the highly correlated metal near the Mott transition in the quasi-two-dimensional layered organic conductor, $\kappa$-(BEDT-TTF)$_{2}$Cu[N(CN)$_{2}$]Cl, by the resistance measurements under control of temperature, pressure, and magnetic field. It was demonstrated that the marginal metallic phase near the Mott transition is susceptible to the field-induced localization transition of the first order, as was predicted theoretically. The thermodynamic consideration of the present results gives a conceptual pressure-field phase diagram of the Mott transition at low temperatures.
  • An organic Mott insulator, $\kappa$-(BEDT-TTF)$_{2}$Cu[N(CN)$_{2}$]Cl, was investigated by resistance measurements under continuously controllable He gas pressure. The first-order Mott transition was demonstrated by observation of clear jump in the resistance variation against pressure. Its critical endpoint at 38 K is featured by vanishing of the resistive jump and critical divergence in pressure derivative of resistance, $|\frac{1}{R}\frac{\partial R}{\partial P}|$, which are consistent with the prediction of the dynamical mean field theory and have phenomenological correspondence with the liquid-gas transition. The present results provide the experimental basis for physics of the Mott transition criticality.
  • $^{1}$H NMR and static susceptibility measurements have been performed in an organic Mott insulator with nearly isotropic triangular lattice, $\kappa$-(BEDT-TTF)$_{2}$Cu$_{2}$(CN)$_{3}$, which is a model system of frustrated quantum spins. The static susceptibility is described by the spin $S$ = 1/2 antiferromagnetic triangular-lattice Heisenberg model with the exchange constant $J$ $\sim$ 250 K. Regardless of the large magnetic interactions, the $^{1}$H NMR spectra show no indication of long-range magnetic ordering down to 32 mK, which is four-orders of magnitude smaller than $J$. These results suggest that a quantum spin liquid state is realized in the close proximity of the superconducting state appearing under pressure.
  • Raman and IR spectra of k-(BEDT-TTF)_2Cu[N(CN)_2]Br [BEDT-TTF denotes bis(ethylenedithiolo)tetrathiafulvalene] and its deuterated and partially deuterated analogues were measured at temperatures between 5 and 300 K and cooling rates from 1 to 20 K/min. It was found that, in partially deuterated samples, the interdimer electron-molecular vibration splitting of nu_3 mode in Raman spectra, the magnitude of the resonance enhancement in Raman spectra, and linewidths of some phonon peaks both in Raman and infrared spectra depend on the cooling rate. These observations were explained by disorder-related effects.
  • The C=C stretching modes in resonance Raman spectra and infrared reflectivity were measured at temperatures between 15 K and 300 K using various polarizations in k-(BEDT-TTF)_2Cu[N(CN)_2]Br, its fully and partially deuterated analogues, and ^{13}C-substituted analogue. The infrared- and Raman-active bands were re-assigned based on the factor group analysis. We found a Raman-active EMV-coupled \nu_3 mode near 1420 cm_{-1}, which shows a large downshift and broadening through the inter-dimer EMV interaction. The mixing of the bridge and ring C=C stretching vibrations depends upon the symmetry of the crystal mode. In contrast to deuterated crystals, the non-deuterated crystals show a splitting in the \nu_2, \nu_3, and \nu_{27} bands.