• We present experimental measurements and theoretical calculations of photoionization time delays from the $3s$ and $3p$ shells in Ar in the photon energy range of 32-42 eV. The experimental measurements are performed by interferometry using attosecond pulse trains and the infrared laser used for their generation. The theoretical approach includes intershell correlation effects between the 3s and 3p shells within the framework of the random phase approximation with exchange (RPAE). The connection between single-photon ionization and the two-color two-photon ionization process used in the measurement is established using the recently developed asymptotic approximation for the complex transition amplitudes of laser-assisted photoionization. We compare and discuss the theoretical and experimental results especially in the region where strong intershell correlations in the 3s to kp channel lead to an induced "Cooper" minimum in the 3s ionization cross-section.
  • We study the temporal aspects of laser-assisted extreme ultraviolet (XUV) photoionization using attosecond pulses of harmonic radiation. The aim of this paper is to establish the general form of the phase of the relevant transition amplitudes and to make the connection with the time-delays that have been recently measured in experiments. We find that the overall phase contains two distinct types of contributions: one is expressed in terms of the phase-shifts of the photoelectron continuum wavefunction while the other is linked to continuum--continuum transitions induced by the infrared (IR) laser probe. Our formalism applies to both kinds of measurements reported so far, namely the ones using attosecond pulse trains of XUV harmonics and the others based on the use of isolated attosecond pulses (streaking). The connection between the phases and the time-delays is established with the help of finite difference approximations to the energy derivatives of the phases. This makes clear that the observed time-delays is a sum of two components: a one-photon Wigner-like delay and an universal delay that originates from the probing process itself.
  • We study photoionization of argon atoms excited by attosecond pulses using an interferometric measurement technique. We measure the difference in time delays between electrons emitted from the $3s^2$ and from the $3p^6$ shell, at different excitation energies ranging from 32 to 42 eV. The determination of single photoemission time delays requires to take into account the measurement process, involving the interaction with a probing infrared field. This contribution can be estimated using an universal formula and is found to account for a substantial fraction of the measured delay.
  • We present an interferometric pump-probe technique for the characterization of attosecond electron wave packets (WPs) that uses a free WP as a reference to measure a bound WP. We demonstrate our method by exciting helium atoms using an attosecond pulse with a bandwidth centered near the ionization threshold, thus creating both a bound and a free WP simultaneously. After a variable delay, the bound WP is ionized by a few-cycle infrared laser precisely synchronized to the original attosecond pulse. By measuring the delay-dependent photoelectron spectrum we obtain an interferogram that contains both quantum beats as well as multi-path interference. Analysis of the interferogram allows us to determine the bound WP components with a spectral resolution much better than the inverse of the attosecond pulse duration.
  • We study resonant two-color two-photon ionization of Helium via the 1s3p 1P1 state. The first color is the 15th harmonic of a tunable titanium sapphire laser, while the second color is the fundamental laser radiation. Our method uses phase-locked high-order harmonics to determine the {\it phase} of the two-photon process by interferometry. The measurement of the two-photon ionization phase variation as a function of detuning from the resonance and intensity of the dressing field allows us to determine the intensity dependence of the transition energy.