• JWST was conceived and built to answer one of the most fundamental questions that humans can address empirically: "How did the Universe make its first stars?". Our First Lights At REionization (FLARE) project transforms the quest for the epoch of reionization from the static to the time domain. It targets the complementary question: "What happened to those first stars?". It will be answered by observations of the most luminous events: supernovae and accretion on to black holes formed by direct collapse from the primordial gas clouds. These transients provide direct constraints on star-formation rates (SFRs) and the truly initial Initial Mass Function (IMF), and they may identify possible stellar seeds of supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Furthermore, our knowledge of the physics of these events at ultra-low metallicity will be much expanded. JWST's unique capabilities will detect these most luminous and earliest cosmic messengers easily in fairly shallow observations. However, these events are very rare at the dawn of cosmic structure formation and so require large area coverage. Time domain astronomy can be advanced to an unprecedented depth by means of a shallow field of JWST reaching 27 mag AB in 2 and 4.4 microns over a field as large as 0.1 square degree visited multiple times each year. Such a survey may set strong constraints or detect massive Pop III SNe at redshifts beyond 10, pinpointing the redshift of the first stars, or at least their death. Based on our current knowledge of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), such a survey will find one or more SLSNe at redshifts above 6 in five years and possibly several direct collapse black holes. Although JWST is not designed as a wide field survey telescope, we show that such a wide field survey is possible with JWST and is critical in addressing several of its key scientific goals.
  • We study optical light curve(LC) relations of type Ia supernovae(SNe~Ia) for their use in cosmology using high-quality photometry published by the Carnegie-Supernovae-Project (CSP-I). We revisit the classical luminosity-decline-rate ($\Delta m_{15}$) relation and the Lira-relation, as well as investigate the time evolution of the ($B-V$) color and $B(B-V)$, which serves as the basis of the color-stretch relation and Color-MAGnitude-Intercept-Calibrations(CMAGIC). Our analysis is based on explosion and radiation transport simulations for spherically-symmetric delayed-detonation models(DDT) producing normal-bright and subluminous SNe~Ia. Empirical LC-relations can be understood as having the same physical underpinnings: i.e. the opacities, ionization balances in the photosphere, and radioactive energy deposition changing with time from below to above the photosphere. Some 3-4 weeks past maximum, the photosphere recedes to ${}^{56}$Ni-rich layers of similar density structure, leading to a similar color evolution. An important secondary parameter is the central density $\rho_c$ of the WD because at higher densities more electron capture elements are produced at the expense of ${}^{56}$Ni production. This results in a $\Delta m_{15}$ spread of 0.1 mag for normal-bright and 0.7 mag in sub-luminous SNe~Ia and $\approx0.2$ mag in the Lira-relation. We show why color-magnitude diagrams emphasize the transition between physical regimes, and allow to construct templates depend mostly on $\Delta m_{15}$ with little dispersion in both the CSP-I sample and our DDT-models. This allows to separate intrinsic SN~Ia variations from the interstellar reddening characterized by $E(B-V)$ and $R_{B}$. Mixing of different explosion scenarios causes a wide spread in empirical relations which may suggest one dominant scenario.
  • The first phase of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I) was a dedicated supernova follow-up program based at the Las Campanas Observatory that collected science data of young, low-redshift supernovae between 2004 and 2009. Presented in this paper is the CSP-I photometric data release of low-redshift stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae. The data consist of optical (uBgVri) photometry of 34 objects, with a subset of 26 having near-infrared (YJH) photometry. Twenty objects have optical pre-maximum coverage with a subset of 12 beginning at least five days prior to the epoch of B-band maximum brightness. In the near-infrared, 17 objects have pre-maximum observations with a subset of 14 beginning at least five days prior to the epoch of J-band maximum brightness. Analysis of this photometric data release is presented in companion papers focusing on techniques to estimate host-galaxy extinction (Stritzinger et al., submitted) and the light-curve and progenitor star properties of the sample (Taddia et al., submitted). The analysis of an accompanying visual-wavelength spectroscopy sample of ~150 spectra will be the subject of a future paper.
  • The LaSilla/QUEST Variability Survey (LSQ) and the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP II) are collaborating to discover and obtain photometric light curves for a large sample of low redshift (z < 0.1) Type Ia supernovae. The supernovae are discovered in the LSQ survey using the 1 m ESO Schmidt telescope at the La Silla Observatory with the 10 square degree QUEST camera. The follow-up photometric observations are carried out using the 1 m Swope telescope and the 2.5 m du Pont telescopes at the Las Campanas Observatory. This paper describes the survey, discusses the methods of analyzing the data and presents the light curves for the first 31 Type Ia supernovae obtained in the survey. The SALT 2.4 supernova light curve fitter was used to analyze the photometric data, and the Hubble diagram for this first sample is presented. The measurement errors for these supernovae averaged 4%, and their intrinsic spread was 14%.
  • We present a Hubble diagram of type II supernovae using corrected magnitudes derived only from photometry, with no input of spectral information. We use a data set from the Carnegie Supernovae Project I (CSP) for which optical and near-infrared light-curves were obtained. The apparent magnitude is corrected by two observables, one corresponding to the slope of the plateau in the $V$ band and the second a colour term. We obtain a dispersion of 0.44 mag using a combination of the $(V-i)$ colour and the $r$ band and we are able to reduce the dispersion to 0.39 mag using our golden sample. A comparison of our photometric colour method (PCM) with the standardised candle method (SCM) is also performed. The dispersion obtained for the SCM (which uses both photometric and spectroscopic information) is 0.29 mag which compares with 0.43 mag from the PCM, for the same SN sample. The construction of a photometric Hubble diagram is of high importance in the coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys, which will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will prohibit spectroscopic follow-up in the vast majority of cases, and hence methods must be deployed which can proceed using solely photometric data.
  • We use observed UV through near IR spectra to examine whether SN 2011fe can be understood in the framework of Branch-normal SNe Ia and to examine its individual peculiarities. As a benchmark, we use a delayed-detonation model with a progenitor metallicity of Z_solar/20. We study the sensitivity of features to variations in progenitor metallicity, the outer density profile, and the distribution of radioactive nickel. The effect of metallicity variations in the progenitor have a relatively small effect on the synthetic spectra. We also find that the abundance stratification of SN 2011fe resembles closely that of a delayed detonation model with a transition density that has been fit to other Branch-normal Type Ia supernovae. At early times, the model photosphere is formed in material with velocities that are too high, indicating that the photosphere recedes too slowly or that SN 2011fe has a lower specific energy in the outer ~0.1 M_sun than does the model. We discuss several explanations for the discrepancies. Finally, we examine variations in both the spectral energy distribution and in the colors due to variations in the progenitor metallicity, which suggests that colors are only weak indicators for the progenitor metallicity, in the particular explosion model that we have studied. We do find that the flux in the U band is significantly higher at maximum light in the solar metallicity model than in the lower metallicity model and the lower metallicity model much better matches the observed spectrum.
  • We present near-infrared (NIR) time-series spectroscopy, as well as complementary ultraviolet (UV), optical, and NIR data, of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) iPTF13ebh, which was discovered within two days from the estimated time of explosion. The first NIR spectrum was taken merely 2.3 days after explosion and may be the earliest NIR spectrum yet obtained of a SN Ia. The most striking features in the spectrum are several NIR C I lines, and the C I {\lambda}1.0693 {\mu}m line is the strongest ever observed in a SN Ia. Interestingly, no strong optical C II counterparts were found, even though the optical spectroscopic time series began early and is densely-cadenced. Except at the very early epochs, within a few days from the time of explosion, we show that the strong NIR C I compared to the weaker optical C II appears to be general in SNe Ia. iPTF13ebh is a fast decliner with {\Delta}m15(B) = 1.79 $\pm$ 0.01, and its absolute magnitude obeys the linear part of the width-luminosity relation. It is therefore categorized as a "transitional" event, on the fast-declining end of normal SNe Ia as opposed to subluminous/91bg-like objects. iPTF13ebh shows NIR spectroscopic properties that are distinct from both the normal and subluminous/91bg-like classes, bridging the observed characteristics of the two classes. These NIR observations suggest composition and density of the inner core similar to that of 91bg-like events, and a deep reaching carbon burning layer not observed in slower declining SNe Ia. There is also a substantial difference between the explosion times inferred from the early-time light curve and the velocity evolution of the Si II {\lambda}0.6355 {\mu}m line, implying a long dark phase of ~ 4 days.
  • We present photospheric-phase observations of LSQ12gdj, a slowly-declining, UV-bright Type Ia supernova. Classified well before maximum light, LSQ12gdj has extinction-corrected absolute magnitude $M_B = -19.8$, and pre-maximum spectroscopic evolution similar to SN 1991T and the super-Chandrasekhar-mass SN 2007if. We use ultraviolet photometry from Swift, ground-based optical photometry, and corrections from a near-infrared photometric template to construct the bolometric (1600-23800 \AA) light curve out to 45 days past $B$-band maximum light. We estimate that LSQ12gdj produced $0.96 \pm 0.07$ $M_\odot$ of $^{56}$Ni, with an ejected mass near or slightly above the Chandrasekhar mass. As much as 27% of the flux at the earliest observed phases, and 17% at maximum light, is emitted bluewards of 3300 \AA. The absence of excess luminosity at late times, the cutoff of the spectral energy distribution bluewards of 3000 \AA, and the absence of narrow line emission and strong Na I D absorption all argue against a significant contribution from ongoing shock interaction. However, up to 10% of LSQ12gdj's luminosity near maximum light could be produced by the release of trapped radiation, including kinetic energy thermalized during a brief interaction with a compact, hydrogen-poor envelope (radius $< 10^{13}$ cm) shortly after explosion; such an envelope arises generically in double-degenerate merger scenarios.
  • We present a study of the peculiar Type Ia supernova 2001ay (SN 2001ay). The defining features of its peculiarity are: high velocity, broad lines, and a fast rising light curve, combined with the slowest known rate of decline. It is one magnitude dimmer than would be predicted from its observed value of Delta-m15, and shows broad spectral features. We base our analysis on detailed calculations for the explosion, light curves, and spectra. We demonstrate that consistency is key for both validating the models and probing the underlying physics. We show that this SN can be understood within the physics underlying the Delta-m15 relation, and in the framework of pulsating delayed detonation models originating from a Chandrasekhar mass, white dwarf, but with a progenitor core composed of 80% carbon. We suggest a possible scenario for stellar evolution which leads to such a progenitor. We show that the unusual light curve decline can be understood with the same physics as has been used to understand the Delta-m15 relation for normal SNe Ia. The decline relation can be explained by a combination of the temperature dependence of the opacity and excess or deficit of the peak luminosity, alpha, measured relative to the instantaneous rate of radiative decay energy generation. What differentiates SN 2001ay from normal SNe Ia is a higher explosion energy which leads to a shift of the Ni56 distribution towards higher velocity and alpha < 1. This result is responsible for the fast rise and slow decline. We define a class of SN 2001ay-like SNe Ia, which will show an anti-Phillips relation.
  • We present an analysis of high precision V light curves (LC) for 18 local Type Ia Supernovae, SNe Ia, as obtained with the same telescope and setup at the Las Campanas Observatory (LCO). This homogeneity provides an intrinsic accuracy a few hundreds of a magnitude both with respect to individual LCs and between different objects. Based on the Single Degenerate Scenario, SD, we identify patterns which have been predicted by model calculations as signatures of the progenitor and accretion rate which change the explosion energy and the amount of electron capture, respectively. Using these templates as principle components and the overdetermined system of SN pairs, we reconstruct the properties of progenitors and progenitor systems. All LCO SNe Ia follow the brightness decline relation but 2001ay. After subtraction of the two components, the remaining scatter is reduced to 0.01-0.03m. Type SNe Ia seem to originate from progenitors with Main Sequence masses of 3Mo with the exception of two subluminous SNe Ia with < 2Mo. The component analysis indicates a wide range of accretion rates in the progenitor systems closing the gap to accretion induced collapses (AIC). SN1991t-like objects show differences in $dm15$ but no tracers of our secondary parameters. This may point to a different origin such as DD-Scenario or the Pulsating Delayed Detonations. SN2001ay does not follow the decline relation. It can be understood in the framework of C-rich WDs, and this group may produce an anti-Phillips relation. We suggest that this may be a result of a common envelope phase and mixing during central He burning as in SN1987A.
  • An extensive dataset for SN 2003hv that covers the flux evolution from maximum light to day +786 is presented. The data are combined with published nebular-phase infrared spectra, and the observations are compared to model light curves and synthetic nebular spectra. SN 2003hv is a normal Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) with photometric and spectroscopic properties consistent with its rarely observed B-band decline-rate parameter, Delta m_15 = 1.61 +- 0.02. The blueshift of the most isolated [Fe II] lines in the nebular-phase optical spectrum appears consistent with those observed in the infrared at similar epochs. At late times there is a prevalent color evolution from the optical toward the near-infrared bands. We present the latest-ever detection of a SN Ia in the near-infrared in Hubble Space Telescope images. The study of the ultraviolet/optical/infrared (UVOIR) light curve reveals that a substantial fraction of the flux is "missing" at late times. Between 300-700 days past maximum brightness, the UVOIR light curve declines linearly following the decay of radioactive Co56, assuming full and instantaneous positron trapping. At 700 days we detect a possible slowdown of the decline in optical bands, mainly in the V band. The data are incompatible with a dramatic infrared catastrophe. However, the idea that an infrared catastrophe occurred in the densest regions before 350 days can explain the missing flux from the UVOIR wavelengths and the flat-topped profiles in the near-infrared. We argue that such a scenario is possible if the ejecta are clumpy. The observations suggest that positrons are most likely trapped in the ejecta.
  • High-quality observations of $B$ and $V$ light curves obtained at Las Campanas Observatory for local Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) show clear evidence that SNe Ia with the same brightness decline or stretch may have systematic and independent deviations at times < 5 days before and at times > 30 days after maximum light. This suggests the existence of two independent secondary parameters which control the shape of SN Ia light curves in addition to the brightness decline relation. stretch. The differences are consistent in morphology of the time dependence and size with predictions by models within the delayed detonation scenario. The secondary parameters may reflect two independent physical effects caused by variations in the progenitor and accretion rates, and link the LC variations in shape with the intrinsic, absolute brightness.
  • In the next decade Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) will be used to test theories predicting changes in the Dark Energy equation of state with time. Ultimately this requires a dedicated space mission like JDEM. SNe Ia are mature cosmological probes --- their limitations are well characterized, and a path to improvement is clear. Dominant systematic errors include photometric calibration, selection effects, reddening, and population-dependent differences. Building on past lessons, well-controlled new surveys are poised to make strides in these areas: the Palomar Transient Factory, Skymapper, La Silla QUEST, Pan-STARRS, the Dark Energy Survey, LSST, and JDEM. They will obviate historical calibrations and selection biases, and allow comparisons via large subsamples. Some systematics follow from our ignorance of SN Ia progenitors, which there is hope of determining with SN Ia rate studies from 0<z<4. Aside from cosmology, SNe Ia regulate galactic and cluster chemical evolution, inform stellar evolution, and are laboratories for extreme physics. Essential probes of SNe Ia in these contexts include spectroscopy from the UV to the IR, X-ray cluster and SN remnant observations, spectropolarimetry, and advanced theoretical studies. While there are an abundance of discovery facilities planned, there is a deficit of follow-up resources. Living in the systematics era demands deep understanding rather than larger statistics. NOAO ReSTAR initiative to build 2-4m telescopes would provide necessary follow-up capability. Finally, to fully exploit LSST, well-matched wide-field spectroscopic capabilities are desirable.
  • We present the results of spectroscopic observations from the ESSENCE high-redshift supernova (SN) survey during its first four years of operation. This sample includes spectra of all SNe Ia whose light curves were presented by Miknaitis et al. (2007) and used in the cosmological analyses of Davis et al. (2007) and Wood-Vasey et al. (2007). The sample represents 273 hours of spectroscopic observations with 6.5 - 10-m-class telescopes of objects detected and selected for spectroscopy by the ESSENCE team. We present 174 spectra of 156 objects. Combining this sample with that of Matheson et al. (2005), we have a total sample of 329 spectra of 274 objects. From this, we are able to spectroscopically classify 118 Type Ia SNe. As the survey has matured, the efficiency of classifying SNe Ia has remained constant while we have observed both higher-redshift SNe Ia and SNe Ia farther from maximum brightness. Examining the subsample of SNe Ia with host-galaxy redshifts shows that redshifts derived from only the SN Ia spectra are consistent with redshifts found from host-galaxy spectra. Moreover, the phases derived from only the SN Ia spectra are consistent with those derived from light-curve fits. By comparing our spectra to local templates, we find that the rate of objects similar to the overluminous SN 1991T and the underluminous SN 1991bg in our sample are consistent with that of the local sample. We do note, however, that we detect no object spectroscopically or photometrically similar to SN 1991bg. Although systematic effects could reduce the high-redshift rate we expect based on the low-redshift surveys, it is possible that SN 1991bg-like SNe Ia are less prevalent at high redshift.
  • We report the discovery and orbit determination of 14 trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) from the ESSENCE Supernova Survey difference imaging dataset. Two additional objects discovered in a similar search of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey database were recovered in this effort. ESSENCE repeatedly observed fields far from the Solar System ecliptic (-21 deg < beta < -5 deg), reaching limiting magnitudes per observation of I~23.1 and R~23.7. We examine several of the newly detected objects in detail, including 2003 UC_414 which orbits entirely between Uranus and Neptune and lies very close to a dynamical region that would make it stable for the lifetime of the Solar System. 2003 SS_422 and 2007 TA_418 have high eccentricities and large perihelia, making them candidate members of an outer class of trans-Neptunian objects. We also report a new member of the ''extended'' or ''detached'' scattered disk, 2004 VN_112, and verify the stability of its orbit using numerical simulations. This object would have been visible to ESSENCE for only ~2% of its orbit, suggesting a vast number of similar objects across the sky. We emphasize that off-ecliptic surveys are optimal for uncovering the diversity of such objects, which in turn will constrain the history of gravitational influences that shaped our early Solar System.
  • We present multiepoch spectra of 13 high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) drawn from the literature, the ESSENCE and SNLS projects, and our own separate dedicated program on the ESO Very Large Telescope. We use the Supernova Identification (SNID) code of Blondin & Tonry to determine the spectral ages in the supernova rest frame. Comparison with the observed elapsed time yields an apparent aging rate consistent with the 1/(1+z) factor (where z is the redshift) expected in a homogeneous, isotropic, expanding universe. These measurements thus confirm the expansion hypothesis, while unambiguously excluding models that predict no time dilation, such as Zwicky's "tired light" hypothesis. We also test for power-law dependencies of the aging rate on redshift. The best-fit exponent for these models is consistent with the expected 1/(1+z) factor.
  • We present 838 ab-type RR Lyrae stars from the Lowell Observatory Near Earth Objects Survey Phase I (LONEOS-I). These objects cover 1430 deg^2 and span distances ranging from 3-30 kpc from the Galactic Center. Object selection is based on phased, photometric data with 28-50 epochs. We use this large sample to explore the bulk properties of the stellar halo, including the spatial distribution. The period-amplitude distribution of this sample shows that the majority of these RR Lyrae stars resemble Oosterhoff type I, but there is a significant fraction (26 %) which have longer periods and appear to be Oosterhoff type II. We find that the radial distributions of these two populations have significantly different profiles (rho_{OoI} ~ R^(-2.26 +- 0.07) and rho_{OoII} ~ R^(-2.88 +- 0.11). This suggests that the stellar halo was formed by at least two distinct accretion processes and supports dual-halo models.
  • We present VRIJHK photometry, and optical and near-infrared spectroscopy, of the heavily extinguished Type Ia supernova (SN) 2002cv, located in NGC 3190, which is also the parent galaxy of the Type Ia SN 2002bo. SN 2002cv, not visible in the blue, has a total visual extinction of 8.74 +- 0.21 mag. In spite of this we were able to obtain the light curves between -10 and +207 days from the maximum in the I band, and also to follow the spectral evolution, deriving its key parameters. We found the peak I-band brightness to be Imax = 16.57 +- 0.10 mag, the maximum absolute I magnitude to be MmaxI = -18.79 +- 0.20, and the parameter dm15(B) specifying the width of the B-band light curve to be 1.46 +- 0.17 mag. The latter was derived using the relations between this parameter and dm40(I) and the time interval dtmax(I) between the two maxima in the I-band light curve. As has been found for previously observed, highly extinguished SNe Ia, a small value of 1.59 +- 0.07 was obtained here for the ratio Rv of the total-to-selective extinction ratio for SN 2002cv, which implies a small mean size for the grains along the line of sight toward us. Since it was found for SN 2002bo a canonical value of 3.1, here we present a clear evidence of different dust properties inside NGC 3190.
  • We present the first large-scale effort of creating composite spectra of high-redshift type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and comparing them to low-redshift counterparts. Through the ESSENCE project, we have obtained 107 spectra of 88 high-redshift SNe Ia with excellent light-curve information. In addition, we have obtained 397 spectra of low-redshift SNe through a multiple-decade effort at Lick and Keck Observatories, and we have used 45 UV spectra obtained by HST/IUE. The low-redshift spectra act as a control sample when comparing to the ESSENCE spectra. In all instances, the ESSENCE and Lick composite spectra appear very similar. The addition of galaxy light to the Lick composite spectra allows a nearly perfect match of the overall spectral-energy distribution with the ESSENCE composite spectra, indicating that the high-redshift SNe are more contaminated with host-galaxy light than their low-redshift counterparts. This is caused by observing objects at all redshifts with the same slit width, which corresponds to different projected distances. After correcting for the galaxy-light contamination, subtle differences in the spectra remain. We have estimated the systematic errors when using current spectral templates for K-corrections to be ~0.02 mag. The variance in the composite spectra give an estimate of the intrinsic variance in low-redshift maximum-light SN spectra of ~3% in the optical and growing toward the UV. The difference between the maximum light low and high-redshift spectra constrain SN evolution between our samples to be < 10% in the rest-frame optical.
  • The first cosmological results from the ESSENCE supernova survey (Wood-Vasey et al. 2007) are extended to a wider range of cosmological models including dynamical dark energy and non-standard cosmological models. We fold in a greater number of external data sets such as the recent Higher-z release of high-redshift supernovae (Riess et al. 2007) as well as several complementary cosmological probes. Model comparison statistics such as the Bayesian and Akaike information criteria are applied to gauge the worth of models. These statistics favor models that give a good fit with fewer parameters. Based on this analysis, the preferred cosmological model is the flat cosmological constant model, where the expansion history of the universe can be adequately described with only one free parameter describing the energy content of the universe. Among the more exotic models that provide good fits to the data, we note a preference for models whose best-fit parameters reduce them to the cosmological constant model.
  • We present extensive u'g'r'i'BVRIYJHKs photometry and optical spectroscopy of SN 2005hk. These data reveal that SN 2005hk was nearly identical in its observed properties to SN 2002cx, which has been called ``the most peculiar known type Ia supernova.'' Both supernovae exhibited high ionization SN 1991T-like pre-maximum spectra, yet low peak luminosities like SN 1991bg. The spectra reveal that SN 2005hk, like SN 2002cx, exhibited expansion velocities that were roughly half those of typical type Ia supernovae. The R and I light curves of both supernovae were also peculiar in not displaying the secondary maximum observed for normal type Ia supernovae. Our YJH photometry of SN 2005hk reveals the same peculiarity in the near-infrared. By combining our optical and near-infrared photometry of SN 2005hk with published ultraviolet light curves obtained with the Swift satellite, we are able to construct a bolometric light curve from ~10 days before to ~60 days after B maximum. The shape and unusually low peak luminosity of this light curve, plus the low expansion velocities and absence of a secondary maximum at red and near-infrared wavelengths, are all in reasonable agreement with model calculations of a 3D deflagration which produces ~0.25 M_sun of 56Ni.
  • We present constraints on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter, w=P/(rho c^2), using 60 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the ESSENCE supernova survey. We derive a set of constraints on the nature of the dark energy assuming a flat Universe. By including constraints on (Omega_M, w) from baryon acoustic oscillations, we obtain a value for a static equation-of-state parameter w=-1.05^{+0.13}_{-0.12} (stat; 1 sigma) +- 0.11 (sys) and Omega_M=0.274^{+0.033}_{-0.020} (stat; 1 sigma) with a best-fit chi^2/DoF of 0.96. These results are consistent with those reported by the SuperNova Legacy Survey in a similar program measuring supernova distances and redshifts. We evaluate sources of systematic error that afflict supernova observations and present Monte Carlo simulations that explore these effects. Currently, the largest systematic currently with the potential to affect our measurements is the treatment of extinction due to dust in the supernova host galaxies. Combining our set of ESSENCE SNe Ia with the SuperNova Legacy Survey SNe Ia, we obtain a joint constraint of w=-1.07^{+0.09}_{-0.09} (stat; 1 sigma) +- 0.12 (sys), Omega_M=0.267^{+0.028}_{-0.018} (stat; 1 sigma) with a best-fit chi^2/DoF of 0.91. The current SN Ia data are fully consistent with a cosmological constant.
  • We describe the implementation and optimization of the ESSENCE supernova survey, which we have undertaken to measure the equation of state parameter of the dark energy. We present a method for optimizing the survey exposure times and cadence to maximize our sensitivity to the dark energy equation of state parameter w=P/rho c^2 for a given fixed amount of telescope time. For our survey on the CTIO 4m telescope, measuring the luminosity distances and redshifts for supernovae at modest redshifts (z~0.5 +- 0.2) is optimal for determining w. We describe the data analysis pipeline based on using reliable and robust image subtraction to find supernovae automatically and in near real-time. Since making cosmological inferences with supernovae relies crucially on accurate measurement of their brightnesses, we describe our efforts to establish a thorough calibration of the CTIO 4m natural photometric system. In its first four years, ESSENCE has discovered and spectroscopically confirmed 102 type Ia SNe, at redshifts from 0.10 to 0.78, identified through an impartial, effective methodology for spectroscopic classification and redshift determination. We present the resulting light curves for the all type Ia supernovae found by ESSENCE and used in our measurement of w, presented in Wood-Vasey et al, 2007.
  • We present a preliminary analysis of an extensive set of optical observations of the Type Ia SN 2005hk. We show that the evolution of SN 2005hk closely follows that of the peculiar SN 2002cx. SN 2005hk is more luminous than SN 2002cx, while still under-luminous compared to normal Type Ia supernovae. The spectrum at 9 days before maximum is dominated by conspicuous Fe III and Ni III lines, and the Si II 6355 line is also clearly visible. All these features have low velocity (~6000 km/s). The near maximum spectra show lines of Si II, S II, Fe II, Fe III, as well as other intermediate mass and iron group elements. Analysis with the code for synthetic spectra SYNOW indicates that all these spectral lines have similar velocities.
  • Using archival data of low-redshift (z < 0.01) Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) and recent observations of high-redshift (0.16 < z <0.64; Matheson et al. 2005) SN Ia, we study the "uniformity'' of the spectroscopic properties of nearby and distant SN Ia. We find no difference in the measures we describe here. In this paper, we base our analysis solely on line-profile morphology, focusing on measurements of the velocity location of maximum absorption (vabs) and peak emission (vpeak). We find that the evolution of vabs and vpeak for our sample lines (Ca II 3945, Si II 6355, and S II 5454, 5640) is similar for both the low- and high-redshift samples. We find that vabs for the weak S II 5454, 5640 lines, and vpeak for S II 5454, can be used to identify fast-declining [dm15 > 1.7] SN Ia, which are also subluminous. In addition, we give the first direct evidence in two high-z SN Ia spectra of a double-absorption feature in Ca II 3945, an event also observed, though infrequently, in low-redshift SN Ia spectra (6/22 SN Ia in our local sample). We report for the first time the unambiguous and systematic intrinsic blueshift of peak emission of optical P-Cygni line profiles in Type Ia spectra, by as much as 8000 km/s. All the high-z SN Ia analyzed in this paper were discovered and followed up by the ESSENCE collaboration, and are now publicly available.