• The formation of dust gaps in protoplanetary disks is one of the most important signposts of disk evolution and possibly the formation of planets. We aim to characterize the 'flaring' disk structure around the Herbig Ae/Be stars HD 100453 and HD 34282. Their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) show an emission excess between 15-40{\mu}m, but very weak (HD 100453) and no (HD 34282) signs of the 10 and 20 {\mu}m amorphous silicate features. We investigate whether this implies the presence of large dust gaps. In this work, spatially resolved mid-infrared Q-band images taken with Gemini North/MICHELLE are investigated. We perform radiative transfer modeling and examine the radial distribution of dust. We simultaneously fit the Q-band images and SEDs of HD 100453 and HD 34282. Our solutions require that the inner-halos and outer-disks are likely separated by large dust gaps that are depleted wih respect to the outer disk by a factor of 1000 or more. The inner edges of the outer disks of HD 100453 and HD 34282 have temperatures of about $160 \pm 10$ K and $60 \pm 5$ K respectively. Because of the high surface brightnesses of these walls, they dominate the emission in the Q-band. Their radii are constrained at 20+2 AU and 92+31 AU, respectively. We conclude that, HD 100453 and HD 34282 likely have disk dust gaps and the upper limit on the dust mass in each gap is estimated to be about $10^{-7}$M$_{\odot}$. We find that the locations and sizes of disk dust gaps are connected to the SED, as traced by the mid-infrared flux ratio F30/F13.5. We propose a new classification scheme for the Meeus groups (Meeus et al. 2001) based on the F30/F13.5 ratio. The absence of amorphous silicate features in the observed SEDs is caused by the depletion of small (smaller than 1 {\mu}m) silicate dust at temperatures above 160 K, which could be related to the presence of a dust gap in that region of the disk.
  • HD 50138 is a B[e] star surrounded by a large amount of circumstellar gas and dust. Its spectrum shows characteristics which may indicate either a pre- or a post-main-sequence system. Mapping the kinematics of the gas in the inner few au of the system contributes to a better understanding of its physical nature. We present the first high spatial and spectral resolution interferometric observations of the Br-gamma line of HD~50138, obtained with VLTI/AMBER. The line emission originates from a region more compact (up to 3 au) than the continuum-emitting region. Blue- and red-shifted emission originates from the two different hemispheres of an elongated structure perpendicular to the polarization angle. The velocity of the emitting medium decreases radially. An overall offset along the NW direction between the line- and continuum-emitting regions is observed. We compare the data with a geometric model of a thin Keplerian disk and a spherical halo on top of a Gaussian continuum. Most of the data are well reproduced by this model, except for the variability, the global offset and the visibility at the systemic velocity. The evolutionary state of the system is discussed; most diagnostics are ambiguous and may point either to a post-main-sequence or a pre-main-sequence nature.
  • The spectra of protoplanetary disks contain mid- and far- infrared emission features produced by forsterite dust grains. The spectral features contain information about the forsterite temperature, chemical composition and grain size. We aim to characterize how the 23 and 69 micron features can be used to constrain the physical locations of forsterite in disks. We check for consistency between two independent forsterite temperature measurements: the 23/69 feature strength ratio and the shape of the 69 micron band. We performed radiative transfer modeling to study the effect of disk properties to the forsterite spectral features. Temperature-dependent forsterite opacities were considered in self-consistent models to compute forsterite emission from protoplanetary disks. Modelling grids are presented to study the effects of grain size, disk gaps, radial mixing and optical depth to the forsterite features. Independent temperature estimates derived from the 23/69 feature strength ratio and the 69 micron band shape are most inconsistent for HD141569 and Oph IRS 48. A case study of the disk of HD141569 shows two solutions to fit the forsterite spectrum. A model with T ~ 40 K, iron-rich (~0-1 % Fe) and 1 micron forsterite grains, and a model with warmer (T ~ 100 K), iron-free, and larger (10 micron) grains. We find that for disks with low upper limits of the 69 micron feature (most notably in flat, self-shadowed disks), the forsterite must be hot, and thus close to the star. We find no correlation between disk gaps and the presence or absence of forsterite features. We argue that the 69 micron feature of the evolved transitional disks HD141569 and Oph IRS 48 is most likely a tracer of larger (i.e. ~10 micron) forsterite grains.
  • Planet-forming disks of gas and dust around young stars contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We aim to characterize how the charge state of PAHs can be used as a probe of flows of gas through protoplanetary gaps. In this context, our goal is to understand the PAH spectra of four transitional disks. In addition, we want to explain the observed correlation between PAH ionization (traced by the 6.2/11.3 feature ratio) and the disk mass (traced by the 1.3 mm luminosity). We implement a model to calculate the charge state of PAHs in the radiative transfer code MCMax. The emission spectra and ionization balance are calculated. A benchmark modeling grid is presented that shows how PAH ionization and luminosity behave as a function of star and disk properties. The PAH ionization is most sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and the electron density. In optically thick disks, where the UV field is low and the electron density is high, PAHs are predominantly neutral. Ionized PAHs trace low-density optically thin disk regions where the UV field is high and the electron density is low. Such regions are characteristic of gas flows through the gaps of transitional disks. We demonstrate that fitting the PAH spectra of four transitional disks requires a contribution of ionized PAHs in gas flows through the gap. The PAH spectra of transitional disks can be understood as superpositions of neutral and ionized PAHs. For HD97048, neutral PAHs in the optically thick disk dominate the spectrum. In the cases of HD169142, HD135344B and Oph IRS 48, small amounts of ionized PAHs located in the gas flows through the gap are strong contributors to the total PAH luminosity. The observed trend between the disk mass and PAH ionization may imply that lower-mass disks have larger gaps. Ionized PAHs in gas flows through these gaps contribute strongly to their spectra.
  • Massive stars play a dominant role in the process of clustered star formation, with their feedback into the molecular cloud through ionizing radiation, stellar winds and outflows. The formation process of massive stars is poorly constrained because of their scarcity, the short formation timescale and obscuration. By obtaining a census of the newly formed stellar population, the star formation history of the young cluster and the role of the massive stars within it can be unraveled. We aim to reconstruct the formation history of the young stellar population of the massive star-forming region RCW 36. We study several dozens of individual objects, both photometrically and spectroscopically, look for signs of multiple generations of young stars and investigate the role of the massive stars in this process. We obtain a census of the physical parameters and evolutionary status of the young stellar population. Using a combination of near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy we estimate ages and masses of individual objects. We identify the population of embedded young stellar objects (YSO) by their infrared colors and emission line spectra. RCW 36 harbors a stellar population of massive and intermediate-mass stars located around the center of the cluster. Class 0/I and II sources are found throughout the cluster. The central population has a median age of 1.1 +/- 0.6 Myr. Of the stars which could be classified, the most massive ones are situated in the center of the cluster. The central cluster is surrounded by filamentary cloud structures; within these, some embedded and accreting YSOs are found. Our age determination is consistent with the filamentary structures having been shaped by the ionizing radiation and stellar winds of the central massive stars. The formation of a new generation of stars is ongoing, as demonstrated by the presence of embedded protostellar clumps, and two exposed jets.
  • *Context The evolution of young massive protoplanetary disks toward planetary systems is expected to include the formation of gaps and the depletion of dust and gas. *Aims A special group of flaring disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars do not show prominent silicate emission features. We focus our attention on four key Herbig Ae/Be stars to understand the structural properties responsible for the absence of silicate feature emission. *Methods We investigate Q- and N-band images taken with Subaru/COMICS, Gemini South/T-ReCS and VLT/VISIR. Our radiative transfer modeling solutions require a separation of inner- and outer- disks by a large gap. From this we characterize the radial density structure of dust and PAHs in the disk. *Results The inner edge of the outer disk has a high surface brightness and a typical temperature between ~100-150 K and therefore dominates the emission in the Q-band. We derive radii of the inner edge of the outer disk of 34, 23, 30 and 63 AU for HD97048, HD169142, HD135344B and Oph IRS 48 respectively. For HD97048 this is the first detection of a disk gap. The continuum emission in the N-band is not due to emission in the wings of PAHs. This continuum emission can be due to VSGs or to thermal emission from the inner disk. We find that PAH emission is not always dominated by PAHs on the surface of the outer disk. *Conclusions. The absence of silicate emission features is due to the presence of large gaps in the critical temperature regime. Many, if not all Herbig disks with Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) classification `group I' are disks with large gaps and can be characterized as (pre-) transitional. An evolutionary path from the observed group I to the observed group II sources seems no longer likely. Instead, both might derive from a common ancestor.
  • Context. The formation and early evolution of high- and intermediate-mass stars towards the main sequence involves the interplay of stars in a clustered and highly complex environment. To obtain a full census of this interaction, the Formation and Early evolution of Massive Stars (FEMS) collaboration studies a well-selected sample of 10 high-mass star-forming regions. Aims. In this study we examine the stellar content of the high-mass star-forming region centered on IRAS 06084-0611 in the Monoceros R2 cloud. Methods. Using the near-infrared H- and K-band spectra from the VLT/SINFONI instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT)and photometric near-infrared NTT/SOFI, 2MASS and Spitzer/IRAC data, we were able to determine the spectral types for the most luminous stars in the cluster. Results. Two very young and reddened massive stars have been detected by SINFONI: a massive Young Stellar Object (YSO) con- sistent with an early-B spectral type and a Herbig Be star. Furthermore, stars of spectral type G and K are detected while still in the Pre-Main Sequence (PMS) phase. We derive additional properties such as temperatures, extinctions, radii and masses. We present a Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and find most objects having intermediate masses between \sim1.5-2.5 M\odot. For these stars we derive a median cluster age of \sim4 Myr. Conclusions. Using Spitzer/IRAC data we confirm earlier studies that the younger class 0/I objects are centrally located while the class II objects are spread out over a larger area, with rough scale size radii of \sim0.5 pc and \sim1.25 pc respectively. Moreover, the presence of a massive YSO, an ultracompact H ii region and highly reddened objects in the center of the cluster suggest a much younger age of < 1 Myr. A possible scenario for this observation would be sequential star formation along the line of sight; from a cluster of intermediate-mass to high-mass stars.