• We present the results of 3 GHz radio continuum observations of the 8 host galaxies of super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe) at $0.1 < z < 0.3$ by using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. Four host galaxies are detected significantly, and two of them are found to have high star-formation rates (SFRs $>$ 20 $M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$) derived from radio emission, making them the most intensely star-forming host galaxies among SLSN host galaxies. We compare radio SFRs and optical SFRs, and find that three host galaxies have an excess in radio SFRs by a factor of $>$2, suggesting the existence of dust-obscured star formation, which cannot be traced by optical studies. Two of the three host galaxies, which are located in the galaxy main sequence based on optical SFRs, are found to be above the main sequence based on their radio SFRs. This suggests a higher fraction of starburst galaxies in SLSN hosts than estimated in previous studies. We calculate extinction from the ratio between radio SFRs and dust-uncorrected optical SFRs and find that the hosts are on the trend of increasing extinction with metallicity, which is consistent with the relation in local star-forming galaxies. We also place a constraint on a pulsar-driven SN model, which predicts quasi-steady synchrotron radio emission.
  • We investigate the X-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN) properties of millimeter galaxies in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey South (GOODS-S) field detected with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), by utilizing the Chandra 7-Ms data, the deepest X-ray survey to date. Our millimeter galaxy sample comes from the ASAGAO survey covering 26 arcmin$^2$ (12 sources at a 1.2-mm flux-density limit of $\approx$0.6 mJy), supplemented by the deeper but narrower 1.3-mm survey of a part of the ASAGAO field by Dunlop et al.\ (2017). Fourteen out of the total 25 millimeter galaxies have Chandra counterparts. The observed AGN fractions at $z=1.5-3$ is found to be 90$^{+8}_{-19}$\% and $57^{+23}_{-25}$\% for the ultra/luminous infrared galaxies with $\log L_{\rm IR}/L_{\odot} = 12-12.8$ and $\log L_{\rm IR}/L_{\odot} = 11.5-12$, respectively. The majority ($\sim$2/3) of the ALMA and/or Herschel detected X-ray AGNs at $z=1.5-3$ appear to be star-formation dominant populations, having $L_{\rm X}$/ $L_{\rm IR}$ ratios smaller than the "simultaneous evolution" value expected from the local black-hole mass to stellar mass ($M_{\rm BH}$-$M_*$) relation. On the basis of the $L_{\rm X}$ and stellar mass relation, we infer that a large fraction of star-forming galaxies at $z=1.5-3$ have black hole masses smaller than those expected from the local $M_{\rm BH}$-$M_*$ relation. This is opposite to previous reports on luminous AGN at same redshifts detected in wider and shallower surveys, which are subject to selection biases against lower luminosity AGN. Our results are consistent with an evolutionary scenario that star formation occurs first, and an AGN-dominant phase follows later, in objects finally evolving into galaxies with classical bulges.
  • ALMA observations of the long wavelength dust continuum are used to estimate the interstellar medium (ISM) masses in a sample of 708 galaxies at z = 0.3 to 4.5 in the COSMOS field. The galaxy sample has known far-infrared luminosities and, hence, star formation rates (SFRs), and stellar masses (M$_{\rm *}$) from the optical-infrared spectrum fitting. The galaxies sample SFRs from the main sequence (MS) to 50 times above the MS. The derived ISM masses are used to determine the dependence of gas mass on redshift, M$_{\rm *}$, and specific SFR (sSFR) relative to the MS. The ISM masses increase approximately 0.63 power of the rate of increase in SFRs with redshift and the 0.32 power of the sSFR/sSFR$_MS$. The SF efficiencies also increase as the 0.36 power of the SFR redshift evolutionary and the 0.7 power of the elevation above the MS; thus the increased activities at early epochs are driven by both increased ISM masses and SF efficiency. Using the derived ISM mass function we estimate the accretion rates of gas required to maintain continuity of the MS evolution ($>100$ \msun yr$^{-1}$ at z $>$ 2.5). Simple power-law dependences are similarly derived for the gas accretion rates. We argue that the overall evolution of galaxies is driven by the rates of gas accretion. The cosmic evolution of total ISM mass is estimated and linked to the evolution of SF and AGN activity at early epochs.