• We performed femtosecond reflection spectroscopy on a series of perovskite-type cobalt oxide $R$BaCo$_2$O$_{6-\delta}$ ($R$=Sm, Gd, and Tb) crystals, in which the electronic transfer was controlled by $R$. The transient reflectivity and the optical conductivity ($\sigma^{\rm PI}(\omega)$) obtained by Kramers-Kronig analysis showed an ultrafast change within a time resolution ($\approx 150$ fs) at room temperature and the appearance of signals of a hidden state different from the high temperature metallic state. The transferred spectral weight in $\sigma^{\rm PI}(\omega)$ upon photoexcitation sensitively depended on the $R$-species, indicating an important role of electronic correlation in the photoexcited state.
  • We report on the spectral cross-calibration results of the Konus-Wind, the Suzaku/WAM, and the Swift/BAT instruments using simultaneously observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). This is the first attempt to use simultaneously observed GRBs as a spectral calibration source to understand systematic problems among the instruments. Based on these joint spectral fits, we find that 1) although a constant factor (a normalization factor) agrees within 20% among the instruments, the BAT constant factor shows a systematically smaller value by 10-20% compared to that of Konus-Wind, 2) there is a systematic trend that the low-energy photon index becomes steeper by 0.1-0.2 and Epeak becomes systematically higher by 10-20% when including the BAT data in the joint fits, and 3) the high-energy photon index agrees within 0.2 among the instruments. Our results show that cross-calibration based on joint spectral analysis is an important step to understanding the instrumental effects which could be affecting the scientific results from the GRB prompt emission data.
  • One of the most prominent, yet controversial associations derived from the ensemble of prompt-phase observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the apparent correlation in the source frame between the peak energy Epeak) of the nu-F(nu) spectrum and the isotropic radiated energy, Eiso. Since most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have Epeak above the energy range (15-150 keV) of the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift, determining accurate Epeak values for large numbers of Swift bursts has been difficult. However, by combining data from Swift/BAT and the Suzaku Wide-band All-Sky Monitor (WAM), which covers the energy range from 50-5000 keV, for bursts which are simultaneously detected, one can accurately fit Epeak and Eiso and test the relationship between them for the Swift sample. Between the launch of Suzaku in July 2005 and the end of April 2009, there were 48 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) which triggered both Swift/BAT and WAM and an additional 48 bursts which triggered Swift and were detected by WAM, but did not trigger. A BAT-WAM team has cross-calibrated the two instruments using GRBs, and we are now able to perform joint fits on these bursts to determine their spectral parameters. For those bursts with spectroscopic redshifts, we can also calculate the isotropic energy. Here we present the results of joint Swift/BAT-Suzaku/WAM spectral fits for 91 of the bursts detected by the two instruments. We show that the distribution of spectral fit parameters is consistent with distributions from earlier missions and confirm that Swift bursts are consistent with earlier reported relationships between Epeak and isotropic energy. We show through time-resolved spectroscopy that individual burst pulses are also consistent with this relationship.
  • The Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) is a function of the large lateral BGO shield of the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) onboard Suzaku. Its large geometrical area of 800 cm^2 per side, the large stopping power for the hard X-rays and the wide-field of view make the WAM an ideal detector for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observations in the energy range of 50-5000 keV. In fact, the WAM has observed 288 GRBs confirmed by other satellites, till the end of May 2007.
  • The origins of Gamma-ray Burst prompt emission are currently not well understood and in this context long, well-observed events are particularly important to study. We present the case of GRB 070616, analysing the exceptionally long-duration multipeaked prompt emission, and later afterglow, captured by all the instruments on-board Swift and by Suzaku WAM. The high energy light curve remained generally flat for several hundred seconds before going into a steep decline. Spectral evolution from hard to soft is clearly taking place throughout the prompt emission, beginning at 285 s after the trigger and extending to 1200 s. We track the movement of the spectral peak energy, whilst observing a softening of the low energy spectral slope. The steep decline in flux may be caused by a combination of this strong spectral evolution and the curvature effect. We investigate origins for the spectral evolution, ruling out a superposition of two power laws and considering instead an additional component dominant during the late prompt emission. We also discuss origins for the early optical emission and the physics of the afterglow. The case of GRB 070616 clearly demonstrates that both broadband coverage and good time resolution are crucial to pin down the origins of the complex prompt emission in GRBs.
  • Observations of the optical afterglow of GRB 041006 with the Kiso Observatory 1.05 m Schmidt telescope, the Lulin Observatory 1.0 m telescope and the Xinglong Observatory 0.6 m telescope. Three-bands (B, V and R) of photometric data points were obtained on 2004 October 6, 0.025-0.329 days after the burst. These very early multi band light curves imply the existence of a color dependent plateau phase. The B-band light curve shows a clear plateau at around 0.03 days after the burst. The R band light curve shows the hint of a plateau, or a possible slope change, at around 0.1 days after the burst. The overall behavior of these multi-band light curves may be interpreted in terms of the sum of two separate components, one showing a monotonic decay the other exhibiting a rising and a falling phase, as described by the standard afterglow model.
  • Aims. Understand the shape and implications of the multiband light curve of GRB 050408, an X-ray rich (XRR) burst. Methods. We present a multiband optical light curve, covering the time from the onset of the gamma-ray event to several months after, when we only detect the host galaxy. Together with X-ray, millimetre and radio observations we compile what, to our knowledge, is the most complete multiband coverage of an XRR burst afterglow to date. Results. The optical and X-ray light curve is characterised by an early flattening and an intense bump peaking around 6 days after the burst onset. We explain the former by an off-axis viewed jet, in agreement with the predictions made for XRR by some models, and the latter with an energy injection equivalent in intensity to the initial shock. The analysis of the spectral flux distribution reveals an extinction compatible with a low chemical enrichment surrounding the burst. Together with the detection of an underlying starburst host galaxy we can strengthen the link between XRR and classical long-duration bursts.
  • Multi-wavelength B, V, R, I observations of the optical afterglow of GRB 050319 were performed by the 1.05-m telescope at Kiso Observatory and the 1.0-m telescope at Lulin Observatory from 1.31 hours to 9.92 hours after the burst. Our R band lightcurves, combined with other published data, can be described by the smooth broken power-law function, with $\alpha_1$ = -0.84 $\pm$0.02 to $\alpha_2$ = -0.48$\pm$0.03, 0.04 days after the GRB. The optical lightcurves are characterized by shallow decays-- as was also observed in the X-rays-- which may have a similar origin, related to energy injection. However, our observations indicate that there is still a puzzle concerning the chromatic breaks in the R band lightcurve (at 0.04 days) and the X-ray lightcurve (at 0.004 days) that remains to be solved.
  • The in-orbit performance and calibration of the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on board the X-ray astronomy satellite Suzaku are described. Its basic performances, including a wide energy bandpass of 10-600 keV, energy resolutions of ~4 keV (FWHM) at 40 keV and ~11% at 511 keV, and a high background rejection efficiency, have been confirmed by extensive in-orbit calibrations. The long-term gains of PIN-Si diodes have been stable within 1% for half a year, and those of scintillators have decreased by 5-20%. The residual non-X-ray background of the HXD is the lowest among past non-imaging hard X-ray instruments in energy ranges of 15-70 and 150-500 keV. We provide accurate calibrations of energy responses, angular responses, timing accuracy of the HXD, and relative normalizations to the X-ray CCD cameras using multiple observations of the Crab Nebula.
  • Even with the renaissance in gamma-ray burst (GRB) research fostered by the Swift satellite, few bursts have both contemporaneous observations at long wavelengths and exquisite observations at later times across the electromagnetic spectrum. We present here contemporaneous imaging with the KAIT robotic optical telescope, dense optical sampling with Lulin, and supplemented with infrared data from PAIRITEL and radio to gamma-ray data from the literature. For the first time, we can test the constancy of microphysical parameters in the internal-external shock paradigm and carefully trace the flow of energy from the GRB to the surrounding medium. KAIT data taken <~1 minute after the start of GRB051111 and coinciding with the fading gamma-ray tail of the prompt emission indicate a smooth re-injection of energy into the shock. No color change is apparent in observations beginning ~1.5 minutes after the GRB and lasting for the first hour after the burst. There are achromatic flux modulations about the best-fit model at late (t~10^4 s) times, possibly due to variations in the external density. We find that the host-galaxy extinction is well fit by a curve similar to that ofthe Small Magellanic Cloud. Low visual extinction, A_V~0.2 mag, combined with high column densities determined from the X-ray and optical spectroscopy (N_H> 10^21 cm^-2), indicate a low dust-to-metals ratio and a possible over-abundance of the light metals. An apparent small ratio of total to selective extinction (R_V~2) argues against dust destruction by the GRB. Time constancy of both the IR/optical/UV spectral energy distribution and the soft X-ray absorption suggests that the absorbing material is not local to the GRB.
  • The 1-m telescope at Lulin Observatory and the 0.76-m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope at Lick Observatory were used to observe the optical afterglow of the short-duration (1.2--1.5 s) gamma-ray burst (GRB) 040924. This object has a soft high-energy spectrum, thus making it an exceptional case, perhaps actually belonging to the short-duration tail of the long-duration GRBs. Our data, combined with other reported measurements, show that the early R-band light curve can be described by two power laws with index alpha = -0.7 (at t = 16-50 min) and alpha = -1.06 (at later times). The rather small difference in the spectral indices can be more easily explained by an afterglow model invoking a cooling break rather than a jet break.
  • In 2004, we established a Japan-Taiwan-China collaboration for GRB study in the East-Asian region. This serves as a valuable addition to the world-wide optical and infrared follow-up network, because the East-Asia region would otherwise be blank. We have been carrying out imaging and spectroscopic follow-up observations at Lulin (Taiwan), Kiso (Japan), WIDGET (Japan) and Xinglong (China). From Xinglong and Kiso, we can locate candidates and obtain early time spectra for afterglows. While WIDGET provides early time observations before the burst, the high-time resolution for multi-band light curves can be obtained at Lulin. With the data from these sites, we can obtain detailed information about the light curve and redshift of GRBs, which are important to understand the mechanism of the afterglows. Up to March 2005, ten follow-up observations have been provided by this East-Asia cooperation. Two optical afterglows were detected, GRB 040924 and GRB 041006. The results of the two detected afterglows are reported in this article.
  • WIDGET is a robotic telescope for monitoring the HETE-2 field-of-view to detect Gamma-ray Burst optical flashes or possible optical precursors. The system has 62degx62deg wide field-of-view which covers about 80% of HETE-2 one with a 2kx2k Apogee U10 CCD camera and a Canon EF 24mm f/1.4 wide-angle lens without a bandpass filter. WIDGET has been in operation since June 2004 at Akeno observing site where is about 200 km apart from Tokyo. Typical limiting magnitude with S/N=3 at the site is V=10mag for 5 seconds exposure and V=11mag for 30 seconds exposure. We had already six coincident observations with HETE-2 position alerts. It was, however, cloudy for all cases due to rainy season in Japan. Expected number of coincident observations under clear sky is about 5 events per year. We will extend the system in early 2005 for Swift era to monitor optical transients in wider field-of-view, multi-color or polarization modes.
  • The Lulin GRB program, using the Lulin One-meter Telescope (LOT) in Taiwan started in July 2003. Its scientific aims are to discover optical counterparts of XRFs and short and long GRBs, then to quickly observe them in multiple bands. Thirteen follow-up observations were provided by LOT between July 2003 and Feb. 2005. One host galaxy was found at GRB 031203. Two optical afterglows were detected for GRB 040924 and GRB 041006. In addition, the optical observations of GRB 031203 and a discussion of the non-detection of the optical afterglow of GRB 031203 are also reported in this article.