• We present X-ray light curves of Cygnus X-3 as measured by the recently launched AstroSat satellite. The light curve folded over the binary period of 4.8 hours shows a remarkable stability over the past 45 years and we find that we can use this information to measure the zero point to better than 100 s. We revisit the historical binary phase measurements and examine the stability of the binary period over 45 years. We present a new binary ephemeris with the period and period derivative determined to an accuracy much better than previously reported. We do not find any evidence for a second derivative in the period variation. The precise binary period measurements, however, indicate a hint of short term episodic variations in periods. Interestingly, these short term period variations coincide with the period of enhanced jet activity exhibited by the source. We discuss the implications of these observations on the nature of the binary system.
  • Low-mass ultrafast rotators show the typical signatures of magnetic activity and are known to produce flares, probably as a result of magnetic reconnection. As a consequence, the coronae of these stars exhibit very large X-ray luminosities and high plasma temperatures, as well as a pronounced inverse FIP effect. To probe the relationship between the coronal properties with a spectral type of ultra-fast rotators with rotation period P < 1d, we analyse the K3 rapid-rotator LO Peg observed with XMM-Newton and compare it with other low-mass rapid rotators of spectral types G9-M1. We investigate the temporal evolution of coronal properties like the temperatures, emission measures, abundances, densities and the morphology of the involved coronal structures. We find two distinguishable levels of activity in the XMM-Newton observation of LO~Peg, which shows significant X-ray variability both in phase and amplitude, implying the presence of an evolving active region on the surface. The X-ray flux varies by 28%, possibly due to rotational modulation. During our observation, a large X-ray flare with a peak X-ray luminosity of 2E30 erg/s and an energy of 7.3E33 erg was observed. At the flare onset we obtain clear signatures for the occurrence of the Neupert effect. The flare plasma also shows an enhancement of iron by a factor of 2 during the rise and peak phase of the flare. Our modeling analysis suggests that the scale size of the flaring X-ray plasma is smaller than 0.5 R_star. Further, the flare loop length appears to be smaller than the pressure scale height of the flaring plasma. Our studies show that the X-ray properties of the LO~Peg are very similar to those of other low-mass ultrafast rotators, i.e., the X-ray luminosity is very close to saturation, its coronal abundances follow a trend of increasing abundance with increasing first ionisation potential, the so-called inverse FIP effect.
  • We present analyses of archival X-ray data obtained from the XMM-Newton satellite and optical photometric data obtained from 1 m class telescopes of ARIES, Nainital of a magnetic cataclysmic variable (MCV) Paloma. Two persistent periods at 156 $\pm$ 1 minutes and 130 $\pm$ 1 minutes are present in the X-ray data, which we interpret as the orbital and spin periods, respectively. These periods are similar to those obtained from the previous as well as new optical photometric observations. The soft-X-ray excess seen in the X-ray spectrum of Paloma and the averaged X-ray spectra are well fitted by two-temperature plasma models with temperatures of 0.10$_{-0.01}^{+0.02}$ and 13.0$_{-0.5}^{+0.5}$ keV with an Fe K$\alpha$ line and an absorbing column density of 4.6 $\times$ 10^{22} cm^{-2}. This material partially covers 60 $\pm$ 2 % of the X-ray source. We also present the orbital and spin-phase-resolved spectroscopy of Paloma in the $0.3 - 10.0$ keV energy band and find that the X-ray spectral parameters show orbital and spin-phase dependencies. New results obtained from optical and X-ray studies of Paloma indicate that it belongs to a class of a few magnetic CVs that seem to have the characteristics of both the polars and the intermediate polars.
  • AstroSat is a multi-wavelength astronomy satellite, launched on 2015 September 28. It carries a suite of scientific instruments for multi-wavelength observations of astronomical sources. It is a major Indian effort in space astronomy and the context of AstroSat is examined in a historical perspective. The Performance Verification phase of AstroSat has been completed and all instruments are working flawlessly and as planned. Some brief highlights of the scientific results are also given here.
  • We present a detailed Chandra study of a sample of ten clusters of galaxies selected based on the presence of substructures in their optical images. The X-ray surface brightness maps of most of these clusters show anisotropic morphologies, especially in the central regions. A total of 22 well resolved significantly bright X-ray peaks (corresponding with high-density regions) are seen in the central parts (within r$_{\rm c}/2$) of the clusters. Multiple peaks are seen in central parts of six clusters. Eleven peaks are found to have optical counterparts (10 coinciding with the BCGs of the 10 clusters and one coinciding with the second brightest galaxy in A539). For most of the clusters, the optical substructures detected in the previous studies are found to be outside the field of view of Chandra. In the spectroscopically produced 2-D temperature maps, significantly lower temperatures are seen at the location of three peaks (two in A539 and one in A376). The centres of five clusters in our sample also host regions of higher temperature compared to the ambient medium, indicating the presence of galaxy scale mergers. The X-ray luminosity, gas mass and central cooling time estimates for all the clusters are presented. The radial X-ray surface-brightness profiles of all but one of the clusters are found to be best-fitted with a double-$\beta$ model, pointing towards the presence of double-phased central gas due to cool-cores. The cooling time estimates of all the clusters, however, indicate that none of them hosts a strong cool-core, although the possibility of weak cool-cores cannot be ruled out.
  • I present an overview of observational studies of quasars of all types, with particular emphasis on X-ray observational studies. The presentation is based on the most popularly accepted unified picture of quasars - collectively referred to as AGN (active galactic nuclei) in this review. Characteristics of X-ray spectra and X-ray variability obtained from various X-ray satellites over the last 5 decades have been presented and discussed. The contribution of AGN in understanding the cosmic X-ray background is discussed very briefly. Attempt has been made to provide up-to-date information; however, this is a vast subject and this presentation is not intended to be comprehensive.
  • I present a brief review of the present status of X-ray emission from Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables (MCVs). A short introduction to the types of Cataclysmic Variables (CVs) is followed by a presentation of some of the properties of the two types of MCVs - Polars and Intermediate Polars (IPs) as seen in X-rays. Finally X-ray spectra of MCVs and future prospects of their studies are discussed.
  • We present an X-ray study of the nuclear and extended emission of a nearby Fanaroff & Riley class I (FR-I) radio galaxy CTD 86 based on the \xmm{} observations. Two different components observed are : diffuse thermal emission from hot gas ($kT\sim 0.79\kev$, $n_e\sim 10^{-3}{\rm cm^{-3}}$, $L_X \sim 5\times10^{42}{\rm erg s^{-1}}$ extended over $\sim 186{\rm kpc}$), and unresolved nuclear emission exhibiting mild activity. The hot gaseous environment of CTD 86 is similar to that found in groups of galaxies or in bright early-type galaxies. No clear signatures of radio-lobe interaction with the diffuse hot gas is evident in this case. X-ray emission from the nucleus is well constrained by an intrinsically absorbed ($N_H \sim 5.9\times10^{22}{\rm cm^{-2}}$) power law ($\Gamma \sim 1.5$) with $2-10\kev$ luminosity $L_X \sim 2.1\times10^{42}{\rm erg s^{-1}}$. We have measured the stellar velocity dispersion, $\sigma=182\pm8\kms$, for the CTD 86 and estimated a mass $M_{BH}\sim 9\times 10^7{\rm M_\odot}$ with $L_{bol}/L_{Edd} \sim 4\times10^{-3}$. The low $L_{bol}/L_{Edd}$ rate and high $L_X/L_{[O III]}$ ratio suggest that the central engine of CTD 86 consists of a truncated accretion disk lacking a strong ionizing UV radiation and an inner hot flow producing the X-ray emission. The truncated disk is likely to be inclined with ($i\sim40^\circ-50^\circ$) such that our line of sight passes through the outer regions of a putative torus and thus results in high X-ray absorption. We have also identified two bright X-ray sources, SDSS J142452.11+263715.1 and SDSS J142443.78+263616.2, near CTD 86. SDSS J142452.11+263715.1 is a type 1 active galactic nucleus at $z=0.3761$ and unabsorbed $0.3-10\kev$ X-ray luminosity $L_X\sim 8 \times 10^{43}{\rm erg s^{-1}}$, while SDSS J142443.78+263616.2 is probably a galaxy with an active nucleus.
  • We present a detailed study of a close pair of clusters of galaxies, A3532 and A3530, and their environments. The \textit{Chandra} X-ray image of A3532 reveals presence of substructures on scales of $\sim$20$^{\prime\prime}$ in its core. XMM-Newton maps of the clusters show excess X-ray emission from an overlapping region between them. Spectrally determined projected temperature and entropy maps do not show any signs of cluster scale mergers either in the overlapping region or in any of the clusters. In A3532, however, some signs of the presence of galaxy scale mergers are visible e.g., anisotropic temperature variations in the projected thermodynamic maps, a wide angled tailed (WAT) radio source in the brighter nucleus of its dumbbell Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG), and a candidate X-ray cavity coincident with the northwestern extension of the WAT source in the low-frequency radio observations. The northwestern extension in A3532 seems either a part of the WAT or an unrelated diffuse source in A3532 or in the background. There is an indication that the cool core in A3532 has been disrupted by the central AGN activity. A reanalysis of the redshift data reinforces the close proximity of the clusters. The excess emission in the overlapping region appears to be a result of tidal interactions as the two clusters approach each other for the first time. However, we can not rule out the possibility of the excess being due to the chance superposition of their X-ray halos.
  • We present analysis of archival X-ray data obtained with the XMM-Newton and Suzaku for a new Intermediate Polar identified as a counterpart of an INTEGRAL discovered gamma-ray source, IGR J17195-4100. We report a new period of 1053.7\pm12.2 s in X-rays. A new binary orbital period of 3.52+1.43-0.80 h is strongly indicated in the power spectrum of the time series. An ephemeris of the new period proposed as the spin period of the system has also been obtained. The various peaks detected in the power spectrum suggest a probable disc-less accretion system. The soft X-rays (<3 keV) dominate the variability seen in the X-ray light curves. The spin modulation shows energy dependence suggesting the possibility of a variable partial covering accretion column. The averaged spectral data obtained with XMM-Newton EPIC cameras show a multi temperature spectra with a soft excess. The latter can be attributed to the varying coverage of accretion curtains.
  • We present X-ray analysis of two Wolf-Rayet (WR) binaries: V444 Cyg and CD Cru using the data from observations with XMM-Newton. The X-ray light curves show the phase locked variability in both binaries, where the flux increased by a factor of $\sim 2$ in the case of V444 Cyg and $\sim 1.5$ in the case of CD Cru from minimum to maximum. The maximum luminosities in the 0.3--7.5 keV energy band were found to be $5.8\times10^{32}$ and $2.8\times10^{32}$ erg s$^{-1}$ for V444 Cyg and CD Cru, respectively. X-ray spectra of these stars confirmed large extinction and revealed hot plasma with prominent emission line features of highly ionized Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca and Fe, and are found to be consistent with a two-temperature plasma model. The cooler plasma at a temperature of $\sim$ 0.6 keV was found to be constant at all phases of both binaries, and could be due to a distribution of small-scale shocks in radiation-driven outflows. The hot components in these binaries were found to be phase dependent. They varied from 1.85 to 9.61 keV for V444 Cyg and from 1.63 to 4.27 keV for CD Cru. The absorption of the hard component varied with orbital phase and found to be maximum during primary eclipse of V444 Cyg. The high plasma temperature and variability with orbital phase suggest that the hard-component emission is caused by a colliding wind shock between the binary components.
  • We present temporal and spectral characteristics of X-ray flares observed from six late-type G-K active dwarfs (V368 Cep, XI Boo, IM Vir, V471 Tau, CC Eri and EP Eri) using data from observations with the XMM-Newton observatory. All the stars were found to be flaring frequently and altogether a total of seventeen flares were detected above the ``quiescent'' state X-ray emission which varied from 0.5 to 8.3 x 10^{29} erg/s. The largest flare was observed in a low activity dwarf XI Boo with a decay time of 10 ks and ratio of peak flare luminosity to ``quiescent'' state luminosity of 2. We have studied the spectral changes during the flares by using colour-colour diagram and by detailed spectral analysis during the temporal evolution of the flares. The exponential decay of the X-ray light curves, and time evolution of the plasma temperature and emission measure are similar to those observed in compact solar flares. We have derived the semiloop lengths of flares based on the hydrodynamic flare model. The size of the flaring loops is found to be less than the stellar radius. The hydrodynamic flare decay analysis indicates the presence of sustained heating during the decay of most flares.
  • We report optimization of the synthesis parameters viz. heating temperature (TH), and hold time (thold) for vacuum (10-5 torr) annealed and LN2 (liquid nitrogen) quenched MgB2 compound. These are single-phase compounds crystallizing in the hexagonal structure (space group P6/mmm) at room temperature. Our XRD results indicated that for phase-pure MgB2, the TH for 10-5 torr annealed and LN2 quenched samples is 750 0C. The right stoichiometry i.e., MgB2 of the compound corresponding to 10-5 Torr and TH of 750 0C is found for the hold time (thold) of 2.30 hours. With varying thold from 1- 4 hours at fixed TH (750 0C) and vacuum (10-5 torr), the c-lattice parameter decreases first and later increases with thold (hours) before a near saturation, while the a-lattice parameter first increase and later decreases beyond thold of 2.30 hours. c/a ratio versus thold plot showed an inverted bell shape curve, touching the lowest value of 1.141 which is reported value for perfect stoichiometry of MgB2. The optimized stoichimetric MgB2 compound exhibited superconductivity at 39.2 K with transition width of 0.6 K. In conclusion, the synthesis parameters for phase pure stoichimetric vacuum annealed MgB2 compound are optimized and are compared with widely reported Ta tube encapsulated samples.
  • Measurements have been performed of the resistivity of the samples of MgB2, AlB2 and AgB2. The samples show presence of impurities. Analyzing the data in terms of the impurity scattering, electron-phonon scattering, and weak localization it has been found that the AlB2 (AgB2) sample involves maximum (minimum) effect of the impurity, electron-phonon interaction and weak localization.
  • Hard X-ray light curves and spectral parameters from our analysis of X-ray data of five AM Her type systems - V2301 Oph, V1432 Aql, EP Draconis, GG Leonis, V834 Cen, and one intermediate polar - TV Col, observed using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer satellite are presented. A new improved ephemeris has been derived for V2301 Oph using the mid-eclipse timings. Average intensity variations, without any change of shape of the light curve or hardness ratio, are observed on timescales of a few days to a few months in V2301 Oph. V1432 Aql shows erratic variations on a timescale of a day, at least 2 sharp dips near orbital phases 0.35 and 0.5, and a total eclipse. Hard X-ray eclipses are also reported in EP Dra and GG Leo. V834 Cen shows intensity variations on yearly timescale and is found to be in a low state in 2002. In TV Col, a binary orbital modulation at 5.5h, in addition to the spin period of 1910s, is reported for the first time. Maximum spectral temperatures in Polars have been determined and used to estimate the masses of the white dwarfs.
  • (Abridged) We present an analysis of a 10-day continuous ASCA observation of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy IRAS 13224-3809. The soft (0.7-1.3 keV) and hard (1.3-10 keV) X-ray band light curves binned to 5000s reveal trough-to-peak variations by a factor >25 and 20, respectively. The light curves in the soft and hard bands are strongly correlated without any significant delay. However, this correlation is not entirely due to changes in the power-law flux alone but also due to changes in the soft X-ray hump emission above the power law. The presence of a soft X-ray hump below 2 keV, previously detected in ROSAT and ASCA data, is confirmed. Time resolved spectroscopy using daily sampling reveals changes in the power-law slope, with Gamma in the range 1.74-2.47, however, day-to-day variations in Gamma are not significant. The Soft hump emission is found to dominate the observed variability on a timescale of a week, but on shorter timescales (20000s) the power-law component appears to dominate the observed variability. Flux resolved spectroscopy reveals that at high flux levels the power law becomes steeper and the soft hump more pronounced. The steepening of the photon index with the fluxes in the soft and hard bands can be understood in the framework of disk/corona models in which accretion disk is heated by viscous dissipation as well as by reprocessing of hard X-rays following an X-ray flare resulting from coronal dissipation through magnetic reconnection events.
  • We present a deep ($\sim$85 ksec) ASCA observation of the prototype Broad Absorption Line Quasar (BALQSO) PHL 5200. This is the best X-ray spectrum of a BALQSO yet. We find that (1) the source is not intrinsically X-ray weak, (2) the line of sight absorption is very strong with N_H=5 x 10^{23} cm^{-2}, (3) the absorber does not cover the source completely; the covering fraction is about 90%. This is consistent with the large optical polarization observed in this source, implying multiple lines of sight. The most surprising result of this observation is that (4) the spectrum of this BALQSO is not exactly similar to other radio-quiet quasars. The hard X-ray spectrum of PHL 5200 is steep with the power-law spectral index alpha ~1.5. This is similar to the steepest hard X-ray slopes observed so far. At low redshifts, such steep slopes are observed in narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies, believed to be accreting at a high Eddington rate. This observation strengthens the analogy between BALQSOs and NLS1 galaxies and supports the hypothesis that BALQSOs represent an early evolutionary state of quasars (Mathur 2000). It is well accepted that the orientation to the line of sight determines the appearance of a quasar; age seems to play a significant role as well.
  • We present results on the X-ray spectra of the radio-loud, high-polarization quasar, PKS 1510-089, based on new data obtained using ASCA, and from archival ROSAT data. The X-ray spectrum obtained by ASCA is unusually hard, with the photon index=1.30+-0.06, while the (non-simultaneous) ROSAT data indicate a steeper spectrum (1.9+-0.3). The X-ray flux at 1 keV is within 10% during both observations. A break in the underlying continuum at about 0.7 keV is suggested. Flat X-ray spectra seem to be the characteristic of high polarization quasars, and their spectra also appear to be harder than that of the other radio-loud but low-polarization quasars. The multiwavelength spectrum of PKS 1510-089 is similar to many other gamma-ray blazars, suggesting the emission is dominated by that from a relativistic jet. A big blue-bump is also seen in its multiwavelength spectrum, suggesting the presence of a strong thermal component as well.