• The oxygen-bearing molecular ions OH+, H2O+, and H3O+ are key species that probe the ionization rate of (partially) molecular gas that is ionized by X-rays and cosmic rays permeating the interstellar medium. We report Herschel far-infrared and submillimeter spectroscopic observations of OH+ in Mrk 231, showing both ground-state P-Cygni profiles, and excited line profiles with blueshifted absorption wings extending up to ~1000 km s^{-1}. In addition, OH+ probes an excited component peaking at central velocities, likely arising from the torus probed by the OH centimeter-wave megamaser. Four lines of H2O+ are also detected at systemic velocities, but H3O+ is undetected. Based on our earlier OH studies, we estimate an abundance ratio of OH/OH+~5-10 for the outflowing components and ~20 for the torus, and an OH+ abundance relative to H nuclei of ~>10^{-7}. We also find high OH+/H2O+ and OH+/H3O+ ratios, both are ~>4 in the torus and ~>10-20 in the outflowing gas components. Chemical models indicate that these high OH+ abundances relative to OH, H2O+, and H3O+ are characteristic of gas with a high ionization rate per unit density, \zeta/n_H~(1-5)x10^{-17} cm^3 s^{-1} and ~(1-2)x10^{-16} cm^3 s^{-1} for the above components, respectively, and an ionization rate of \zeta~(0.5-2)x10^{-12} s^{-1}. X-rays appear to be unable to explain the inferred ionization rate, and thus we suggest that low-energy (10-400 MeV) cosmic-rays are primarily responsible for the ionization with \dot{M}_{CR}~0.01 M_{sun} yr^{-1} and \dot{E}_{CR}~10^{44} erg s^{-1}, the latter corresponding to 1% of the AGN luminosity and similar to the energetics of the molecular outflow. We suggest that cosmic-rays accelerated in the forward shock associated with the molecular outflow are responsible for the ionization, as they diffuse through the outflowing molecular phase downstream.
  • We report on the energetics of molecular outflows in 14 local Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) that show unambiguous outflow signatures (P-Cygni profiles or high-velocity absorption wings) in the far-infrared lines of OH measured with the Herschel/PACS spectrometer. Detection of both ground-state (at 119 and 79 um) and one or more radiatively-excited (at 65 and 84 um) lines allows us to model the nuclear gas (<~300 pc) as well as the more extended components using spherically symmetric radiative transfer models. The highest molecular outflow velocities are found in buried sources, in which slower but massive expansion of the nuclear gas is also observed. With the exception of a few outliers, the outflows have momentum fluxes of (2-5)xL_IR/c and mechanical luminosities of (0.1-0.3)% of L_IR. The moderate momentum boosts in these sources (<~3) suggest that the outflows are mostly momentum-driven by the combined effects of AGN and nuclear starbursts, as a result of radiation pressure, winds, and supernovae remnants. In some sources (~20%), however, powerful (10^{10.5-11} Lsun) AGN feedback and (partially) energy-conserving phases are required, with momentum boosts in the range 3-20. These outflows appear to be stochastic strong-AGN feedback events that occur throughout the merging process. In a few sources, the outflow activity in the innermost regions has subsided in the last ~1 Myr. While OH traces the molecular outflows at sub-kpc scales, comparison of the masses traced by OH with those previously inferred from tracers of more extended outflowing gas suggests that most mass is loaded (with loading factors of Mdot/SFR=1-10) from the central galactic cores (a few x 100 pc). Outflow depletion timescales are <10^8 yr, shorter than the gas consumption timescales by factors of 1.1-15, and are anti-correlated with the AGN luminosity.
  • The first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1) was completed in April 2011 and is currently performing observations resulting from its first call for proposals in addition to a continuing program of commissioning and characterization observations. The instrument consists of 258 dual-polarization dipoles, which are digitized and combined into beams. Four independently-steerable dual-polarization beams are available, each with two "tunings" of 16 MHz bandwidth that can be independently tuned to any frequency between 10 MHz and 88 MHz. The system equivalent flux density for zenith pointing is ~3 kJy and is approximately independent of frequency; this corresponds to a sensitivity of ~5 Jy/beam (5sigma, 1 s); making it one of the most sensitive meter-wavelength radio telescopes. LWA1 also has two "transient buffer" modes which allow coherent recording from all dipoles simultaneously, providing instantaneous all-sky field of view. LWA1 provides versatile and unique new capabilities for Galactic science, pulsar science, solar and planetary science, space weather, cosmology, and searches for astrophysical transients. Results from LWA1 will detect or tightly constrain the presence of hot Jupiters within 50 parsecs of Earth. LWA1 will provide excellent resolution in frequency and in time to examine phenomena such as solar bursts, and pulsars over a 4:1 frequency range that includes the poorly understood turnover and steep-spectrum regimes. Observations to date have proven LWA1's potential for pulsar observing, and just a few seconds with the completed 256-dipole LWA1 provide the most sensitive images of the sky at 23 MHz obtained yet. We are operating LWA1 as an open skies radio observatory, offering ~2000 beam-hours per year to the general community.