• The inner Galactic Bulge has, until recently, been avoided in chemical evolution studies due to extreme extinction and stellar crowding. Large, near-IR spectroscopic surveys, such as APOGEE, allow for the first time the measurement of metallicities in the inner region of our Galaxy. We study metallicities of 33 K/M giants situated in the Galactic Center region from observations obtained with the APOGEE survey. We selected K/M giants with reliable stellar parameters from the APOGEE/ASPCAP pipeline. Distances, interstellar extinction values, and radial velocities were checked to confirm that these stars are indeed situated in the inner Galactic Bulge. We find a metal-rich population centered at [M/H] = +0.4 dex, in agreement with earlier studies of other bulge regions, but also a peak at low metallicity around $\rm [M/H] = -1.0\,dex$, suggesting the presence of a metal-poor population which has not previously been detected in the central region. Our results indicate a dominant metal-rich population with a metal-poor component that is enhanced in the $\alpha$-elements. This metal-poor population may be associated with the classical bulge and a fast formation scenario.
  • The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution infrared spectroscopic survey spanning all Galactic environments (i.e., bulge, disk, and halo), with the principal goal of constraining dynamical and chemical evolution models of the Milky Way. APOGEE takes advantage of the reduced effects of extinction at infrared wavelengths to observe the inner Galaxy and bulge at an unprecedented level of detail. The survey's broad spatial and wavelength coverage enables users of APOGEE data to address numerous Galactic structure and stellar populations issues. In this paper we describe the APOGEE targeting scheme and document its various target classes to provide the necessary background and reference information to analyze samples of APOGEE data with awareness of the imposed selection criteria and resulting sample properties. APOGEE's primary sample consists of ~100,000 red giant stars, selected to minimize observational biases in age and metallicity. We present the methodology and considerations that drive the selection of this sample and evaluate the accuracy, efficiency, and caveats of the selection and sampling algorithms. We also describe additional target classes that contribute to the APOGEE sample, including numerous ancillary science programs, and we outline the targeting data that will be included in the public data releases.
  • We use the Spitzer IRAC catalogue of the Galactic Center (GC) point sources (Ramirez et al. 2008) and combine it with new isochrones (Marigo et al. 2008) to derive extinctions based on photometry of red giants and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. This new extinction map extends to much higher values of Av than previoulsy available. Our new extinction map of the GC region covers 2.0 x 1.4 degree (280 x 200 pc at a distance of 8 kpc). We apply it to deredden the LPVs found by Glass et al. (2001) near the GC. We make period-magnitude diagrams and compare them to those from other regions of different metallicity. The Glass-LPVs follow well-defined period-luminosity relations (PL) in the IRAC filter bands at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 micron. The period-luminosity relations are similar to those in the Large Magellanic Cloud, suggesting that the PL relation in the IRAC bands is universal. We use ISOGAL data to derive mass-loss rates and find for the Glass-LPV sample some correlation between mass-loss and pulsation period, as expected theoretically.The GC has an excess of high luminosity and long period LPVs compared to the Bulge, which supports previous suggestions that it contains a younger stellar population.
  • We have studied the correlation between 2357 Chandra X-ray point sources in a 40 x 40 parsec field and ~20,000 infrared sources we observed in the corresponding subset of our 2 x 1.4 degree Spitzer/IRAC Galactic Center Survey at 3.6-8.0 um, using various spatial and X-ray hardness thresholds. The correlation was determined for source separations of less than 0.5", 1" or 2". Only the soft X-ray sources show any correlation with infrared point sources on these scales, and that correlation is very weak. The upper limit on hard X-ray sources that have infrared counterparts is <1.7% (3 sigma). However, because of the confusion limit of the IR catalog, we only detect IR sources with absolute magnitudes < ~1. As a result, a stronger correlation with fainter sources cannot be ruled out. Only one compact infrared source, IRS 13, coincides with any of the dozen prominent X-ray emission features in the 3 x 3 parsec region centered on Sgr A*, and the diffuse X-ray and infrared emission around Sgr A* seems to be anti-correlated on a few-arcsecond scale. We compare our results with previous identifications of near-infrared companions to Chandra X-ray sources.
  • A mid-infrared (3.6-8 um) survey of the Galactic Center has been carried out with the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. This survey covers the central 2x1.4 degree (~280x200 pc) of the Galaxy. At 3.6 and 4.5 um the emission is dominated by stellar sources, the fainter ones merging into an unresolved background. At 5.8 and 8 um the stellar sources are fainter, and large-scale diffuse emission from the ISM of the Galaxy's central molecular zone becomes prominent. The survey reveals that the 8 to 5.8 um color of the ISM emission is highly uniform across the surveyed region. This uniform color is consistent with a flat extinction law and emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Models indicate that this broadband color should not be expected to change if the incident radiation field heating the dust and PAHs is <10^4 times that of the solar neighborhood. The few regions with unusually red emission are areas where the PAHs are underabundant and the radiation field is locally strong enough to heat large dust grains to produce significant 8 um emission. These red regions include compact H II regions, Sgr B1, and wider regions around the Arches and Quintuplet Clusters. In these regions the radiation field is >10^4 times that of the solar neighborhood. Other regions of very red emission indicate cases where thick dust clouds obscure deeply embedded objects or very early stages of star formation.
  • We discuss oxygen and iron abundance patterns in K and M red-giant members of the Galactic bulge and in the young and massive M-type stars inhabiting the very center of the Milky Way. The abundance results from the different bulge studies in the literature, both in the optical and the infrared, indicate that the [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] relation in the bulge does not follow the disk relation, with [O/Fe] values falling above those of the disk. Based on these elevated values of [O/Fe] extending to large Fe abundances, it is suggested that the bulge underwent a rapid chemical enrichment with perhaps a top-heavy initial mass function. The Galactic Center stars reveal a nearly uniform and slightly elevated (relative to solar) iron abundance for a studied sample which is composed of 10 red giants and supergiants. Perhaps of more significance is the fact that the young Galactic Center M-type stars show abundance patterns that are reminiscent of those observed for the bulge population and contain enhanced abundance ratios of alpha-elements relative to either the Sun or Milky Way disk at near-solar metallicities.
  • We present 15 - 20 micron long-slit spectra, from the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on Spitzer, of NGC 7023. We observe recently-discovered interstellar emission features, at 15.9, 16.4, 17.0, 17.4, 17.8, and 18.9 microns, throughout the reflection nebula. The 16.4 micron emission feature peaks near the photodissociation front northwest of the star, as do the aromatic emission features (AEFs) at 3.3, 6.2 and 11.3 microns. The 16.4 micron emission feature is thus likely related to the AEFs and radiates by non-equilibrium emission. The new 18.9 micron emission feature, by contrast, decreases monotonically with stellar distance. We consider candidate species for the 18.9 micron feature, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fullerenes, and diamonds. We describe future laboratory and observational research needed to identify the 18.9 micron feature carrier.
  • We present a re-analysis of our H- and K-band photometry and light-curves for GCIRS 16SW, a regular periodic source near the Galactic center. These data include those presented by DePoy et al. (2004); we correct a sign error in their reduction, finding GCIRS 16SW to be an eclipsing binary with no color variations. We find the system to be an equal mass overcontact binary (both stars overfilling their Roche lobes) in a circular orbit with a period P=19.4513 days, an inclination angle i=71 degrees. This confirms and strengthens the findings of Martins et al. (2006) that GCIRS 16SW is an eclipsing binary composed of two ~50Msun stars, further supporting evidence of recent star formation very close to the Galactic center. Finally, the calculated luminosity of each component is close to the Eddington luminosity, implying that the temperature of 24400 K given by Najarro et al. (1997) might be overestimated for these evolved stars.
  • We report measurements of the light curve of the variable Galactic Center source IRS16SW. The light curve is not consistent with an eclipsing binary or any other obvious variable star. The source may be an example of a high mass variable predicted theoretically but not observed previously.
  • We announce the initial release of data from the Ohio State University Bright Spiral Galaxy Survey, a BVRJHK imaging survey of a well-defined sample of 205 bright, nearby spiral galaxies. We present H-band morphological classification on the Hubble sequence for the OSU Survey sample. We compare the H-band classification to B-band classification from our own images and from standard galaxy catalogs. Our B-band classifications match well with those of the standard catalogs. On average, galaxies with optical classifications from Sa through Scd appear about one T-type earlier in the H-band than in the B-band, but with large scatter. This result does not support recent claims made in the literature that the optical and near-IR morphologies of spiral galaxies are uncorrelated. We present detailed descriptions of the H-band morphologies of our entire sample, as well as B- and H-band images for a set of 17 galaxies chosen as type examples, and BRH color-composite images of six galaxies chosen to demonstrate the range in morphological variation as a function of wavelength. Data from the survey are accessible at http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~survey/
  • We discuss the Aromatic Infrared Band (AIB) profiles observed by ISO-SWS towards a number of bright interstellar regions where dense molecular gas is illuminated by stellar radiation. Our sample spans a broad range of excitation conditions (exciting radiation fields with effective temperature, Teff, ranging from 23,000 to 45,000 K). The SWS spectra are decomposed coherently in our sample into Lorentz profiles and a broadband continuum. We find that the individual profiles of the main AIBs at 3.3, 6.2, 8.6 and 11.3 microns are well represented with at most two lorentzians. Furthermore, we show that the positions and widths of these AIBs are remarkably stable (within a few cm-1). We then extract the profiles of individual AIBs from the data and compare them to a model of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) cation emission which includes the temperature dependence of the AIB profiles. The present similarity of the AIB profiles requires that the PAH temperature distribution remains roughly the same whatever the radiation field hardness. Deriving the temperature distribution of interstellar PAHs, we show that its hot tail, which controls the AIB spectrum, sensitively depends on Nmin (the number of C-atoms in the smallest PAH) and Teff. Comparing the observed profiles of the individual AIBs to our model results, we can match most of the AIB profiles if Nmin is increased with Teff. We then discuss our results in the broader context of ISO observations of fainter interstellar regions where PAHs are expected to be in neutral form.
  • New research is presented, and previous research is reviewed, on the emission and absorption of interstellar aromatic hydrocarbons. Emission from aromatic hydrocarbons dominate the mid-infrared emission of many galaxies, including our own Milky Way galaxy. Only recently have aromatic hydrocarbons been observed in absorption in the interstellar medium, along lines of sight with high column densities of interstellar gas and dust. Much work on interstellar aromatics has been done, with astronomical observations and laboratory and theoretical astrochemistry. In many cases the predictions of laboratory and theoretical work are confirmed by astronomical observations, but in other cases clear discrepancies exist which provide problems to be solved by a combination of astronomical observations, laboratory studies, and theoretical studies. The emphasis of this paper will be on current outstanding puzzles concerning aromatic hydrocarbons which require further laboratory and theoretical astrochemistry to resolve. This paper will also touch on related topics where laboratory and theoretical astrochemistry studies are needed to explain astrophysical observations, such as a possible absorption feature due to interstellar "diamonds" and the search for fullerenes in space.
  • The detection of a new 16.4 micron emission feature in the ISO-SWS spectra of NGC 7023, M17, and the Orion Bar is reported. Previous laboratory experiments measured a mode near this wavelength in spectra of PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons), and so we suggest the new interstellar 16.4 micron feature could be assigned to low-frequency vibrations of PAHs. The best carrier candidates seem to be PAH molecules containing pentagonal rings.
  • The first measurement of the photospheric abundances in a star at the Galactic Center are presented. A detailed abundance analysis of the Galactic Center M2 supergiant IRS 7 was carried out using high-resolution near-infrared echelle spectra. The Fe abundance for IRS 7 was found to be close to solar, [Fe/H] = -0.02 +/- 0.13, and nearly identical to the Fe abundances we obtained for the nearby M supergiants alpha Ori and VV Cep. Analysis of the first and second overtone lines of CO was used to derive an effective temperature of 3600 +/- 230 K, a microturbulent velocity of 3.0 +/- 0.3 km/s, and a carbon abundance log epsilon(C) = 7.78 +/- 0.13, or [C/H] = -0.77. In addition, we find a high depletion of 0.74 +/- 0.32 dex in O and an enhancement of 0.92 +/- 0.18 dex in N. These abundances are consistent with the dredge-up of CNO-cycle products but require deep mixing in excess of that predicted by standard models for red supergiants. In light of our measured solar Fe abundance for IRS 7, we discuss other indicators of metallicity at the Galactic Center, the interpretation of low-resolution near-infrared spectra of late-type giants and supergiants, including the need for caution in using such spectra as measures of metallicity, and the evolution of massive young stars at the Galactic Center. We suggest the possibility that rapid stellar rotation is common for stars formed under conditions in the Galactic Center, and that extra internal mixing induced by high rotation rates, rather than evolution at high metallicity, is the explanation for many of the unusual properties of the hot emission-line stars in the Galactic Center.
  • We present here the 7.0-8.7 micron spectrum of the bright reflection nebula NGC 7023. Our observations are made with the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) on the European satellite Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The vibrational bands of the ionized fullerene C60+ are expected at 7.11 and 7.51 microns, while those of the neutral fullerene C60 are expected at 7.0 and 8.45 microns. We estimate an upper limit in NGC 7023 for the C60+ abundance of <0.26% of the interstellar abundance of carbon, while C60 contains <0.27% of interstellar carbon.
  • We present near-infrared spectroscopy of fluorescent molecular hydrogen (H_2) emission from NGC 1333, NGC 2023, NGC 2068, and NGC 7023 and derive the physical properties of the molecular material in these reflection nebulae. Our observations of NGC 2023 and NGC 7023 and the physical parameters we derive for these nebulae are in good agreement with previous studies. Both NGC 1333 and NGC 2068 have no previously-published analysis of near-infrared spectra. Our study reveals that the rotational-vibrational states of molecular hydrogen in NGC 1333 are populated quite differently from NGC 2023 and NGC 7023. We determine that the relatively weak UV field illuminating NGC 1333 is the primary cause of the difference. Further, we find that the density of the emitting material in NGC 1333 is of much lower density, with n ~ 10^2 - 10^4 cm^-3. NGC 2068 has molecular hydrogen line ratios more similar to those of NGC 7023 and NGC 2023. Our model fits to this nebula show that the bright, H_2-emitting material may have a density as high as n ~ 10^5 cm^-3, similar to what we find for NGC 2023 and NGC 7023. Our spectra of NGC 2023 and NGC 7023 show significant changes in both the near-infrared continuum and H_2 intensity along the slit and offsets between the peaks of the H_2 and continuum emission. We find that these brightness changes may correspond to real changes in the density and temperatures of the emitting region, although uncertainties in the total column of emitting material along a given line of sight complicates the interpretation. The spatial difference in the peak of the H_2 and near-infrared continuum peaks in NGC 2023 and NGC 7023 shows that the near-infrared continuum is due to a material which can survive closer to the star than H_2 can.
  • We present new groundbased 3 $\mu$m spectra of 14 young stellar objects with H_2O ice absorption bands. The broad absorption feature at 3.47 $\mu$m was detected toward all objects and its optical depth is correlated with the optical depth of H_2O ice, strengthening an earlier finding. The broad absorption feature at 3.25 $\mu$m was detected toward two more sources and an upper limit is given for a third source. The optical depths of the 3.25 $\mu$m feature obtained to date are better correlated with the optical depth of the refractory silicate dust than with that of H_2O ice. If this trend is confirmed, this would support our proposed identification of the feature as the C--H stretch of aromatic hydrocarbons at low temperature. An absorption feature at 3.53 $\mu$m due to solid methanol was detected for the first time toward MonR2/IRS2, as well as toward W33A and GL 2136. The wavelengths of the CH_3OH features toward W33A, GL 2136, and NGC7538/IRS9 can be fit by CH_3OH-rich ices, while the wavelength of the feature toward MonR2/IRS2 suggests an H_2O-rich ice environment. Solid methanol abundances toward GL 2136, NGC7538/IRS9, and MonR2/IRS2 are 3-5 % relative to H_2O ice. There is an additional narrow absorption feature near 3.47 $\mu$m toward W33A. For the object W51/IRS2, spatially resolved spectra from 2 to 4 $\mu$m indicate that the H_2O ice is located predominantly in front of the eastern component and that the H_2O ice extinction is much deeper than previously estimated. For the object RNO 91, spectra from 2 to 4 $\mu$m reveal stellar (or circumstellar) CO gas absorption and deeper H_2O ice extinction than previously estimated.
  • We present results of photometric monitoring campaigns of G, K and M dwarfs in the Pleiades carried out in 1994, 1995 and 1996. We have determined rotation periods for 18 stars in this cluster. In this paper, we examine the validity of using observables such as X-ray activity and amplitude of photometric variations as indicators of angular momentum loss. We report the discovery of cool, slow rotators with high amplitudes of variation. This contradicts previous conclusions about the use of amplitudes as an alternate diagnostic of the saturation of angular momentum loss. We show that the X-ray data can be used as observational indicators of mass-dependent saturation in the angular momentum loss proposed on theoretical grounds.
  • We measure the extinction law in a galaxy's spiral arm and interarm regions using a visual and infrared (BVRJHK) imaging study of the interacting galaxies NGC 2207 and IC 2163. This is an overlapping spiral galaxy pair in which NGC 2207 partially occults IC 2163. This geometry enables us to directly measure the extinction of light from the background galaxy as it passes through the disk of the foreground galaxy. We measure the extinction as a function of wavelength, and find that there is less extinction in the optical bands than expected from a normal Galactic extinction law. This deviation is significantly larger in the interarm region than in the spiral arm. The extinction curve in the spiral arm resembles a Milky Way $R_V=5.0$ dust model and the interarm extinction curve is flatter (``greyer'') still. We examine the effect of scattering of background galaxy light into the line of sight and find that it is negligible. We also examine the effect of an unresolved patchy dust distribution using a simple two-component dust model as well as the clumpy dust model of Witt & Gordon (1996). Both models clearly demonstrate that an unresolved patchy dust distribution can flatten the extinction curve significantly. When fit to the data, both models suggest that the observed difference between the arm and interarm extinction curves is caused by the interarm region of NGC 2207 having a higher degree of dust patchiness (density ratio between high-density and low-density phases) than the spiral arm region. We note that an unresolved patchy dust distribution will cause us to underestimate the average column depth of gas in a galaxy if based solely on the visual extinction. It is much better to use the infrared extinction for this purpose.
  • We present a new spectroscopic classification for OB stars based on H-band (1.5 micron to 1.8 micron) observations of a sample of stars with optical spectral types. Our initial sample of nine stars demonstrates that the combination of He I 1.7002 micron and H Brackett series absorption can be used to determine spectral types for stars between about O4 and B7 (to within about +/- 2 sub-types). We find that the Brackett series exhibits luminosity effects similar to the Balmer series for the B stars. This classification scheme will be useful in studies of optically obscured high mass star forming regions. In addition, we present spectra for the OB stars near 1.1 micron and 1.3 micron which may be of use in analyzing their atmospheres and winds.
  • We present near-infrared spectroscopy of fluorescent molecular hydrogen (H_2) emission from molecular filaments in the reflection nebula NGC 7023. We derive the relative column densities of H_2 rotational-vibrational states from the measured line emission and compare these results with several model photodissociation regions covering a range of densities, incident UV-fields, and excitation mechanisms. Our best-fit models for one filament suggest, but do not require, either a combination of different densities, suggesting clumps of 10^6 cm^{-3} in a 10^4 - 10^5 cm^{-3} filament, or a combination of fluorescent excitation and thermally-excited gas, perhaps due to a shock from a bipolar outflow. We derive densities and UV fields for these molecular filaments that are in agreement with previous determinations.
  • New and existing K-band spectra for 19 Galactic center late-type stars have been analyzed along with representative spectra of disk and bulge M giants and supergiants. Absorption strengths for strong atomic and molecular features have been measured. The Galactic center stars generally exhibit stronger absorption features centered near Na I (2.206 mic) and Ca I (2.264 mic) than representative disk M stars at the same CO absorption strength. Based on the absolute K-band magnitudes and CO and H2O absorption strengths for the Galactic center stars and known M supergiants and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, we conclude that only IRS 7 must be a supergiant. Two other bright stars in our Galactic center sample are likely supergiants as well. The remaining bright, cool stars in the Galactic center that we have observed are most consistent with being intermediate mass/age AGB stars. We identify four of the Galactic center stars as long period variables based on their K-band spectral properties and associated photometric variability. Estimates of initial masses and ages for the GC stars suggest multiple epochs of star formation have occurred in the Galactic center over the last 7-100 Myr.
  • J, H, K, and L photometry for the stars in the central 2' (5 pc) of the Galaxy are presented. Using the observed J-H, H-K, and K-L colors and assumed intrinsic colors, we determine the interstellar extinction at 2.2 mic (A_K) for approximately 1100 individual stars. The mean A_K (= 3.3 mag) is similar to previous results, but we find that the reddening is highly variable and some stars are likely to be seen through A_K > 6 mag. The de-reddened K-band luminosity function points to a significantly brighter component to the stellar population (> 1.5 mag at K) than found in the stellar population in Baade's window, confirming previous work done at lower spatial resolution. The observed flux of all Galactic center stars with estimated Ko (de-reddened magnitude) </= 7.0 mag is approx 25 % of the total in the 2' X 2' field. Our observations confirm the recent finding that several bright M stars in the Galactic center are variable. Our photometry also establishes the near-infrared variability of the M1-2 supergiant, IRS 7.
  • We present a survey for extended 2.2 $\mu$m emission in 20 new visual reflection nebulae, illuminated by stars with temperatures of 3,600 --- 33,000 K. We detect extended 2.2 $\mu$m emission in 13 new nebulae, illuminated by stars with temperatures of 6,800 -- 33,000 K. For most of these 13 nebulae we have measured $J-K$, $H-K$, and $K-L'$, as well as obtaining surface brightness measurements at the wavelength of the 3.3 $\mu$m emission feature. All of the reflection nebulae with extended near infrared emission in excess over scattered starlight have very similar near infrared colors and show the 3.3 $\mu$m feature in emission with similar feature-to-continuum ratios. The 3.3 $\mu$m feature-to-continuum ratio ranges from $\sim$3 to $\sim$9, both within individual nebulae and from nebula to nebula, which suggests that the 3.3 $\mu$m feature and its underlying continuum arise from different materials, or from different ranges of sizes within a size distribution of particles. No dependence on the temperature of the illuminating star is seen in the near infrared colors or 3.3 $\mu$m feature-to-continuum ratio, over a factor of two in stellar temperature. This is similar to our previous IRAS results, in which we found no dependence of the ratio of 12 $\mu$m to 100 $\mu$m surface brightnesses in reflection nebulae illuminated by stars with temperatures of 5,000--33,000 K.
  • A new 3.2--3.5~$\mu$m spectrum of the protostar Mon~R2/IRS-3 confirms our previous tentative detection of a new absorption feature near 3.25 $\mu$m. The feature in our new spectrum has a central wavelength of 3.256 $\mu$m (3071 cm$^{-1}$) and has a full-width at half maximum of 0.079 $\mu$m (75 cm$^{-1}$). We explore a possible identification with aromatic hydrocarbons at low temperatures, which absorb at a similar wavelength. If the feature is due to aromatics, the derived column density of C--H bonds is $\sim$1.8 $\times$ $10^{18}$ cm$^{-2}$. If the absorbing aromatic molecules are of roughly the same size as those responsible for aromatic emission features in the interstellar medium, then we estimate that $\sim$9\% of the cosmic abundance of carbon along this line of sight would be in aromatic hydrocarbons, in agreement with abundance estimates from emission features.