• We describe the in-orbit performance of the soft X-ray imaging system consisting of the Soft X-ray Telescope and the Soft X-ray Imager aboard Hitomi. Verification and calibration of imaging and spectroscopic performance are carried out making the best use of the limited data of less than three weeks. Basic performance including a large field of view of 38'x38' is verified with the first light image of the Perseus cluster of galaxies. Amongst the small number of observed targets, the on-minus-off pulse image for the out-of-time events of the Crab pulsar enables us to measure a half power diameter of the telescope as about 1.3'. The average energy resolution measured with the onboard calibration source events at 5.89 keV is 179 pm 3 eV in full width at half maximum. Light leak and cross talk issues affected the effective exposure time and the effective area, respectively, because all the observations were performed before optimizing an observation schedule and parameters for the dark level calculation. Screening the data affected by these two issues, we measure the background level to be 5.6x10^{-6} counts s^{-1} arcmin^{-2} cm^{-2} in the energy band of 5-12 keV, which is seven times lower than that of the Suzaku XIS-BI.
  • X-ray polarimetry promises to give new information about high-energy astrophysical sources, such as binary black hole systems, micro-quasars, active galactic nuclei, and gamma-ray bursts. We designed, built and tested a hard X-ray polarimeter X-Calibur to be used in the focal plane of the InFOCuS grazing incidence hard X-ray telescope. X-Calibur combines a low-Z Compton scatterer with a CZT detector assembly to measure the polarization of 10-80 keV X-rays making use of the fact that polarized photons Compton scatter preferentially perpendicular to the electric field orientation. X-Calibur achieves a high detection efficiency of order unity.
  • X-ray polarimetry promises to give qualitatively new information about high-energy astrophysical sources, such as binary black hole systems, micro-quasars, active galactic nuclei, and gamma-ray bursts. We designed, built and tested a hard X-ray polarimeter X-Calibur to be used in the focal plane of the InFOCuS grazing incidence hard X-ray telescope. X-Calibur combines a low-Z Compton scatterer with a CZT detector assembly to measure the polarization of 10-80 keV X-rays making use of the fact that polarized photons Compton scatter preferentially perpendicular to the electric field orientation. X-Calibur achieves a high detection efficiency of order unity.
  • We present the results of a study of the late-type spiral galaxy NGC 0959, before and after application of the pixel-based dust extinction correction described in Tamura et al. 2009 (Paper I). Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV), ground-based Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT) UBVR, and Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 micron images are studied through pixel Color-Magnitude Diagrams (pCMDs) and pixel Color-Color Diagrams (pCCDs). We define groups of pixels based on their distribution in a pCCD of (B - 3.6 micron) versus (FUV - U) colors after extinction correction. In the same pCCD, we trace their locations before the extinction correction was applied. This shows that selecting pixel groups is not meaningful when using colors uncorrected for dust. We also trace the distribution of the pixel groups on a pixel coordinate map of the galaxy. We find that the pixel-based (two-dimensional) extinction correction is crucial to reveal the spatial variations in the dominant stellar population, averaged over each resolution element. Different types and mixtures of stellar populations, and galaxy structures such as a previously unrecognized bar, become readily discernible in the extinction-corrected pCCD and as coherent spatial structures in the pixel coordinate map.
  • Suzaku X-ray observations of a young supernova remnant, Cassiopeia A, were carried out. K-shell transition lines from highly ionized ions of various elements were detected, including Chromium (Cr-Kalpha at 5.61 keV). The X-ray continuum spectra were modeled in the 3.4--40 keV band, summed over the entire remnant, and were fitted with a simplest combination of the thermal bremsstrahlung and the non-thermal cut-off power-law models. The spectral fits with this assumption indicate that the continuum emission is likely to be dominated by the non-thermal emission with a cut-off energy at > 1 keV. The thermal-to-nonthermal fraction of the continuum flux in the 4-10 keV band is best estimated as ~0.1. Non-thermal-dominated continuum images in the 4--14 keV band were made. The peak of the non-thermal X-rays appears at the western part. The peak position of the TeV gamma-rays measured with HEGRA and MAGIC is also shifted at the western part with the 1-sigma confidence. Since the location of the X-ray continuum emission was known to be presumably identified with the reverse shock region, the possible keV-TeV correlations give a hint that the accelerated multi-TeV hadrons in Cassiopeia A are dominated by heavy elements in the reverse shock region.
  • We present a method to estimate and map the two-dimensional distribution of dust extinction in the late-type spiral galaxy NGC 959 from the theoretical and observed flux ratio of optical V and mid-IR (MIR) 3.6 micron images. Our method is applicable to both young and old stellar populations for a range of metallicities, and is not restricted to lines-of-sight toward star-formation (SF) regions. We explore this method using a pixel-based analysis on images of NGC 959 obtained in the V-band at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT) and at 3.6 micron (L-band) with Spitzer/IRAC. We present the original and extinction corrected GALEX far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) images, as well as optical UBVR images of NGC 959. While the dust lanes are not clearly evident at GALEX resolution, our dust map clearly traces the dust that can be seen silhouetted against the galaxy's disk in the high-resolution HST images of NGC 959. The advantages of our method are: (1) it only depends on two relatively common broadband images in the optical V-band and in the MIR at 3.6 micron (but adding a near-UV band improves its fidelity); and (2) it is able to map the two-dimensional spatial distribution of dust within a galaxy. This powerful tool could be used to measure the detailed distribution of dust extinction within higher redshift galaxies to be observed with, e.g., the HST/WFC3 (optical--near-IR) and JWST (mid-IR), and to distinguish properties of dust within galaxy bulges, spiral arms, and inter-arm regions.
  • We use \suzaku observations to measure the spatial variation of the Fe K$\alpha$ line with radius in the \tycho supernova remnant. The Fe line widths show a significant decrease from a FWHM value of 210 eV at the center to 130 eV at the rim. Over the same radial range the line center energy remains nearly constant. These observations are consistent with a scenario in which the shell of Fe-emitting ejecta in \tycho is expanding at speeds of 2800--3350 km s$^{-1}$. The minimum line width we measure is still a factor of two larger than expected from a single component plasma emission model. If thermal Doppler broadening is the dominant additional source of broadening, we infer an ion temperature of $(1--3) \times 10^{10}$ K.
  • We report measurements of the spin susceptibility and the electron effective mass for two-dimensional electrons confined at the interfaces of MgxZn1-xO/ZnO single heterostructures (x = 0.05, 0.08, and 0.11), grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on (0001) ZnO substrates. By tuning the built-in polarization through control of the barrier composition, the electron density was systematically varied in the range of 5.6 x 10^11 to 1.6 x 10^12 cm^-2, corresponding to a range of 3.1 < rs < 5.2, where rs is the average electron spacing measured in units of the effective Bohr radius. We used the coincidence technique, where crossings of the spin-split Landau levels occur at critical tilt angles of magnetic field, to evaluate the spin susceptibility. In addition, we determined the effective mass from the temperature dependence of the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations measured at the coincidence conditions. The susceptibility and the effective mass both gradually increase with decreasing electron density, reflecting the role of electron-electron interaction.
  • Tycho's supernova remnant was observed by the XIS and HXD instruments onboard the Suzaku satellite on 2006 June 26-29 for 92 ks. The spectrum up to 30 keV was well fitted with a two-component model, consisting of a power-law with photon index of 2.7 and a thermal bremsstrahlung model with temperature of 4.7 keV. The former component can alternatively be modeled as synchrotron emission from a population of relativistic electrons with an estimated roll-off energy of around 1 keV. In the XIS spectra, in addition to the prominent Fe K_alpha line (6.445 keV), we observe for the first time significant K_alpha line emission from the trace species Cr and Mn at energies of 5.48 keV and 5.95 keV, respectively. Faint K_beta lines from Ca (4.56 keV) and Fe (7.11 keV) are also seen. The ionization states of Cr and Mn, based on their line centroids, are estimated to be similar to that of Fe K_alpha (Fe XV or XVI).
  • The Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on board Suzaku covers a wide energy range from 10 keV to 600 keV by combination of silicon PIN diodes and GSO scintillators. The HXD is designed to achieve an extremely low in-orbit back ground based on a combination of new techniques, including the concept of well-type active shield counter. With an effective area of 142 cm^2 at 20 keV and 273 cm2 at 150 keV, the background level at the sea level reached ~1x10^{-5} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 30 keV for the PI N diodes, and ~2x10^{-5} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 100 keV, and ~7x10^{-6} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 200 keV for the phoswich counter. Tight active shielding of the HXD results in a large array of guard counters surrounding the main detector parts. These anti-coincidence counters, made of ~4 cm thick BGO crystals, have a large effective area for sub-MeV to MeV gamma-rays. They work as an excellent gamma-ray burst monitor with limited angular resolution (~5 degree). The on-board signal-processing system and the data transmitted to the ground are also described.
  • The in-orbit performance and calibration of the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on board the X-ray astronomy satellite Suzaku are described. Its basic performances, including a wide energy bandpass of 10-600 keV, energy resolutions of ~4 keV (FWHM) at 40 keV and ~11% at 511 keV, and a high background rejection efficiency, have been confirmed by extensive in-orbit calibrations. The long-term gains of PIN-Si diodes have been stable within 1% for half a year, and those of scintillators have decreased by 5-20%. The residual non-X-ray background of the HXD is the lowest among past non-imaging hard X-ray instruments in energy ranges of 15-70 and 150-500 keV. We provide accurate calibrations of energy responses, angular responses, timing accuracy of the HXD, and relative normalizations to the X-ray CCD cameras using multiple observations of the Crab Nebula.
  • We present a Chandra observation of the H II region RCW89. The nebula lies on 10' north from the central pulsar PSR B1509-58, and it has been suggested that the nebula is irradiated by the pulsar jet. We performed a spectral analysis of the seven brightest emitting regions aligned in a ``horse-shoe'' shape, and found that the temperature of the knots increases along the ``horse-shoe'' in the clockwise direction, while, in contrast, the ionization parameter decreases. This strongly supports a picture of energy transfer via the precessing pulsar jet. We examined the energy budget assuming that RCW89 is powered by the pulsar jet, and confirmed that the pulsar rotational energy loss is sufficient to drive the nebula. The rate of energy injection into RCW89 by the jet was estimated from the synchrotron radiation flux. We obtained a heating time-scale of 1400 yr, which is consistent with the pulsar characteristic age of 1700 yr. To explain the temperature gradient, we discuss the cooling process for plasma clouds in RCW89. We argue that the plasma clouds can be cooled down by the adiabatic expansion within 70 yr, and form the temperature gradient reflecting the sequential heating by the precessing pulsar jet. We also determined the velocities of the individual plasma clouds by spectral fitting. The plasma clouds in RCW89 are moving away at 240 ~ 860 km/s, which constrains the inclination angle of the pulsar spin axis i > 50 degree and the expanding velocity of the shell as v > 1100 km/s.
  • We present a detailed study of molecular gas toward the supernovae remnant G347.3-0.5 (J1713.7-3946) obtained with the 4m mm/sub-mm telescope NANTEN . This study has revealed that several intensity peaks and the overall distribution of the molecular gas with radial velocities from -12 km s-1 to -3 km s-1 show a remarkably good correlation with the X-ray features, strongly supporting the kinematic distance ~ 1 kpc derived by Fukui et al. (2003), as opposed to 6 kpc previously claimed. In addition, we show that absorption of X-rays is caused by local molecular gas at softer X-ray bands. Subsequent measurements of the CO(J=3-2) made with the ASTE 10 m and CSO 10.4 m telescopes toward the molecular intensity peaks have revealed higher excitation conditions, most likely higher temperatures above ~ 30 K as compared to that of the typical gas in low mass dark clouds. This is most likely caused by enhanced heating by the high energy events in the SNR, where possible mechanisms include heating by X-rays, gamma-rays, and/or cosmic ray protons, although we admit additional radiative heating by young protostars embedded may be working as well. In one of the CO peaks, we have confirmed the presence of broad molecular wings of ~ 20 km s-1 velocity extent in the CO(J=3-2) transition. The SNR evolution is well explained as the free expansion phase based on the distance of 1 kpc.
  • We report on a new photon-counting detector possessing unprecedented spatial resolution, moderate spectral resolution and high background-rejection capability for 0.1-100 keV X-rays. It consists of an X-ray charge-coupled device (CCD) and scintillator. The scintillator is directly deposited on the back surface of the X-ray CCD. Low-energy X-rays below 10 keV can be directly detected in the CCD. The majority of hard X-rays above 10 keV pass through the CCD but can be detected in the scintillator, generating optical photons there. Since CCDs have a moderate detection efficiency for optical photons, they can again be absorbed by the CCD. We demonstrate the high spatial resolution of 10 micron order for 17.4 keV X-rays with our prototype device.
  • The CZT detector on the Infocus hard X-ray telescope is a pixellated solid-state device capable of imaging spectroscopy by measuring the position and energy of each incoming photon. The detector sits at the focal point of an 8m focal length multilayered grazing incidence X-ray mirror which has significant effective area between 20--40 keV. The detector has an energy resolution of 4.0keV at 32keV, and the Infocus telescope has an angular resolution of 2.2 arcminute and a field of view of about 10 arcminutes. Infocus flew on a balloon mission in July 2001 and observed Cygnus X-1. We present results from laboratory testing of the detector to measure the uniformity of response across the detector, to determine the spectral resolution, and to perform a simple noise decomposition. We also present a hard X-ray spectrum and image of Cygnus X-1, and measurements of the hard X-ray CZT background obtained with the SWIN detector on Infocus.
  • Magneto-optical spectroscopy of a transparent ferromagnetic semiconductor, anatase TiO2 doped with Co, is carried out at room temperature. A large magneto-optical response with ferromagnetic field dependence is observed throughout from ultraviolet to visible range and increases with increasing Co content or carrier concentration. The magnitude of magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) per unit thickness has a peak around the absorption edge such a huge value of ~10400 degree/cm at 3.57 eV for a 10 mol% Co-doped specimen. Although the results are not sufficient to prove that the ferromagnetism is in the ordinary framework of diluted magnetic semiconductors, the coexistence of Co impurity and mobile carrier is shown to transform the band structure of host TiO2 to generate ferromagnetism.