• The ILC Higgs White Paper is a review of Higgs Boson theory and experiment at the International Linear Collider (ILC). Theory topics include the Standard Model Higgs, the two-Higgs doublet model, alternative approaches to electroweak symmetry breaking, and precision goals for Higgs boson experiments. Experimental topics include the measurement of the Higgs cross section times branching ratio for various Higgs decay modes at ILC center of mass energies of 250, 500, and 1000 GeV, and the extraction of Higgs couplings and the total Higgs width from these measurements. Luminosity scenarios based on the ILC TDR machine design are used throughout. The gamma-gamma collider option at the ILC is also discussed.
  • We present a photometric catalog for Spitzer Space Telescope warm mission observations of the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP; centered at $\rm R.A.=18^h00^m00^s$, $\rm Decl.=66^d33^m38^s.552$). The observations are conducted with IRAC in 3.6 $\mu$m and 4.5 $\mu$m bands over an area of 7.04 deg$^2$ reaching 1$\sigma$ depths of 1.29 $\mu$Jy and 0.79 $\mu$Jy in the 3.6 $\mu$m and 4.5 $\mu$m bands respectively. The photometric catalog contains 380,858 sources with 3.6 $\mu$m and 4.5 $\mu$m band photometry over the full-depth NEP mosaic. Point source completeness simulations show that the catalog is 80% complete down to 19.7 AB. The accompanying catalog can be utilized in constraining the physical properties of extra-galactic objects, studying the AGN population, measuring the infrared colors of stellar objects, and studying the extra-galactic infrared background light.
  • We present an analysis of the blank sky spectra observed with the Faint Object Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We study the diffuse sky emission from ultraviolet to optical wavelengths, which is composed of the zodiacal light (ZL), diffuse Galactic light (DGL), and residual emission. The observations were performed toward 54 fields distributed widely over the sky, with the spectral coverage from 0.2 to 0.7 um. In order to avoid contaminating light from the earthshine, we use the data collected only in orbital nighttime. The observed intensity is decomposed into the ZL, DGL, and residual emission, in eight photometric bands spanning our spectral coverage. We found that the derived ZL reflectance spectrum is flat in the optical, which indicates major contribution of C-type asteroids to the interplanetary dust (IPD). In addition, the ZL reflectance spectrum has an absorption feature at ~0.3 um. The shape of the DGL spectrum is consistent with those found in earlier measurements and model predictions. While the residual emission contains a contribution from the extragalactic background light, we found that the spectral shape of the residual looks similar to the ZL spectrum. Moreover, its optical intensity is much higher than that measured from beyond the IPD cloud by Pioneer10/11, and also than that of the integrated galaxy light. These findings may indicate the presence of an isotropic ZL component, which is missed in the conventional ZL models.
  • Observational study on near-infrared (IR) scattering properties of interstellar dust grains has been limited due to its faintness. Using all-sky maps obtained from Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE), we investigate the scattering property from diffuse Galactic light (DGL) measurements at 1.25, 2.2, and 3.5 {\mu}m in addition to our recent analyses of diffuse near-IR emission (Sano et al. 2015; Sano et al. 2016). As a result, we first find that the intensity ratios of near-IR DGL to 100 {\mu}m emission increase toward low Galactic latitudes at 1.25 and 2.2 {\mu}m. The derived latitude dependence can be reproduced by a scattered light model of interstellar dust with a large scattering asymmetry factor g = <cos{\theta}> of $0.8^{+0.2}_{-0.3}$ at 1.25 and 2.2 {\mu}m, assuming an infinite Galaxy disk as an illuminating source. The derived asymmetry factor is comparable to the values obtained in the optical, but several times larger than that expected from a recent dust model. Since possible latitude dependence of ultraviolet-excited dust emission at 1.25 and 2.2 {\mu}m would reduce the large asymmetry factor to the reasonable value, our result may indicate the first detection of such an additional emission component in the diffuse interstellar medium.
  • We reanalyze data of near-infrared background taken by Infrared Telescope in Space (IRTS) based on up-to-date observational results of zodiacal light, integrated star light and diffuse Galactic light. We confirm the existence of residual isotropic emission, which is slightly lower but almost the same as previously reported. At wavelengths longer than 2 {\mu}m, the result is fairly consistent with the recent observation with AKARI. We also perform the same analysis using a different zodiacal light model by Wright and detected residual isotropic emission that is slightly lower than that based on the original Kelsall model. Both models show the residual isotropic emission that is significantly brighter than the integrated light of galaxies.
  • We report measurements of the Diffuse Galactic Light (DGL) spectrum in the near-infrared, spanning the wavelength range 0.95-1.65 {\mu}m by the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER). Using the low-resolution spectrometer (LRS) calibrated for absolute spectro-photometry, we acquired long-slit spectral images of the total diffuse sky brightness towards four high-latitude fields spread over four sounding rocket flights. To separate the DGL spectrum from the total sky brightness, we correlated the spectral images with a 100 {\mu}m intensity map, which traces the dust column density in optically thin regions. The measured DGL spectrum shows no resolved features and is consistent with other DGL measurements in the optical and at near-infrared wavelengths longer than 1.8 {\mu}m. Our result implies that the continuum is consistently reproduced by models of scattered starlight in the Rayleigh scattering regime with a few large grains.
  • We have discovered that Europa, Ganymede and Callisto are bright around 1.5 {\mu}m even when not directly lit by sunlight, based on observations from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Subaru Telescope. The observations were conducted with non-sidereal tracking on Jupiter outside of the field of view to reduce the stray light subtraction uncertainty due to the close proximity of Jupiter. Their eclipsed luminosity was $10^{-6}$-$10^{-7}$ of their uneclipsed brightness, which is low enough that this phenomenon has been undiscovered until now. In addition, Europa in eclipse was <1/10 of the others at 1.5 {\mu}m, a potential clue to the origin of the source of luminosity. Likewise, Ganymede observations were attempted at 3.6 {\mu}m by the Spitzer Space Telescope but it was not detected, suggesting a significant wavelength dependence. The reason why they are luminous even when in the Jovian shadow is still unknown, but forward-scattered sunlight by haze in the Jovian upper atmosphere is proposed as the most plausible candidate. If this is the case, observations of these Galilean satellites while eclipsed by the Jovian shadow provide us a new technique to investigate Jovian atmospheric composition, and investigating the transmission spectrum of Jupiter by this method is important for investigating the atmosphere of extrasolar giant planets by transit spectroscopy.
  • Jan. 8, 2014 hep-ph, hep-ex
    This report summarizes the work of the Energy Frontier Higgs Boson working group of the 2013 Community Summer Study (Snowmass). We identify the key elements of a precision Higgs physics program and document the physics potential of future experimental facilities as elucidated during the Snowmass study. We study Higgs couplings to gauge boson and fermion pairs, double Higgs production for the Higgs self-coupling, its quantum numbers and $CP$-mixing in Higgs couplings, the Higgs mass and total width, and prospects for direct searches for additional Higgs bosons in extensions of the Standard Model. Our report includes projections of measurement capabilities from detailed studies of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), a Gamma-Gamma Collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC), the Large Hadron Collider High-Luminosity Upgrade (HL-LHC), Very Large Hadron Colliders up to 100 TeV (VLHC), a Muon Collider, and a Triple-Large Electron Positron Collider (TLEP).
  • We have developed a near-infrared spectrometer designed to measure the absolute intensity of the Solar 854.2 nm CaII Fraunhofer line, scattered by interplanetary dust, in the Zodiacal light spectrum. Based on the known equivalent line width in the Solar spectrum, this measurement can derive the Zodiacal brightness, testing models of the Zodiacal light based on morphology that are used to determine the extragalactic background light in absolute photometry measurements. The spectrometer is based on a simple high-resolution tipped filter placed in front of a compact camera with wide-field refractive optics to provide the large optical throughput and high sensitivity required for rocket-borne observations. We discuss the instrument requirements for an accurate measurement of the absolute Zodiacal light brightness, the measured laboratory characterization, and the instrument performance in flight.
  • We have developed and characterized an imaging instrument to measure the spatial properties of the diffuse near-infrared extragalactic background light in a search for fluctuations from z > 6 galaxies during the epoch of reionization. The instrument is part of the Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER), designed to observe the extragalactic background light above the Earth's atmosphere during a suborbital sounding rocket flight. The imaging instrument incorporates a 2x2 degree field of view, to measure fluctuations over the predicted peak of the spatial power spectrum at 10 arcminutes, and 7"x7" pixels, to remove lower redshift galaxies to a depth sufficient to reduce the low-redshift galaxy clustering foreground below instrumental sensitivity. The imaging instrument employs two cameras with \Delta \lambda / \lambda ~0.5 bandpasses centered at 1.1 and 1.6 microns to spectrally discriminate reionization extragalactic background fluctuations from local foreground fluctuations. CIBER operates at wavelengths where the electromagnetic spectrum of the reionization extragalactic background is thought to peak, and complements fluctuations measurements by AKARI and Spitzer at longer wavelengths. We have characterized the instrument in the laboratory, including measurements of the sensitivity, flat-field response, stray light performance, and noise properties. Several modifications were made to the instrument following a first flight in 2009 February. The instrument performed to specifications in subsequent flights in 2010 July and 2012 March, and the scientific data are now being analyzed.
  • Absolute spectrophotometric measurements of diffuse radiation at 1 \mu m to 2 \mu m are crucial to our understanding of the radiative content of the Universe from nucleosynthesis since the epoch of reionization, the composition and structure of the Zodiacal dust cloud in our solar system, and the diffuse galactic light arising from starlight scattered by interstellar dust. The Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS) on the rocket-borne Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER) is a \lambda / \Delta \lambda \sim 15-30 absolute spectrophotometer designed to make precision measurements of the absolute near-infrared sky brightness between 0.75 \mu m < \lambda < 2.1 \mu m. This paper presents the optical, mechanical and electronic design of the LRS, as well as the ground testing, characterization and calibration measurements undertaken before flight to verify its performance. The LRS is shown to work to specifications, achieving the necessary optical and sensitivity performance. We describe our understanding and control of sources of systematic error for absolute photometry of the near-infrared extragalactic background light.
  • The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER) is a suite of four instruments designed to study the near infrared (IR) background light from above the Earth's atmosphere. The instrument package comprises two imaging telescopes designed to characterize spatial anisotropy in the extragalactic IR background caused by cosmological structure during the epoch of reionization, a low resolution spectrometer to measure the absolute spectrum of the extragalactic IR background, and a narrow band spectrometer optimized to measure the absolute brightness of the Zodiacal light foreground. In this paper we describe the design and characterization of the CIBER payload. The detailed mechanical, cryogenic, and electrical design of the system are presented, including all system components common to the four instruments. We present the methods and equipment used to characterize the instruments before and after flight, and give a detailed description of CIBER's flight profile and configurations. CIBER is designed to be recoverable and has flown twice, with modifications to the payload having been informed by analysis of the first flight data. All four instruments performed to specifications during the second flight, and the scientific data from this flight are currently being analyzed.
  • We study $\mu - e$ conversion with sequential four generations. A large mass for the fourth generation neutrino can enhance the conversion rate by orders of magnitude. We compare constraints obtained from $\mu - e$ conversion using experimental bounds on various nuclei with those from $\mu \to e \gamma$ and $\mu \to e\bar e e$. We find that the current bound from $\mu - e$ conversion with Au puts the most stringent constraint in this model. The relevant flavor changing parameter $\lambda_{\mu e} = V^*_{\mu 4}V_{e4}^{}$ is constrained to be less than $1.6\times 10^{-5}$ for the fourth generation neutrino mass larger than 100 GeV. Implications for future $\mu -e$ conversion, $\mu \to e\gamma$ and $\mu \to e\bar e e$ experiments are discussed.
  • Interplanetary dust (IPD) scatters solar radiation which results in the zodiacal light that dominates the celestial diffuse brightness at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. Both asteroid collisions and cometary ejections produce the IPD, but the relative contribution from these two sources is still unknown. The Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS) onboard the Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER) observed the astrophysical sky spectrum between 750 and 2100 nm over a wide range of ecliptic latitude. The resulting zodiacal light spectrum is redder than the solar spectrum, and shows a broad absorption feature, previously unreported, at approximately 900 nm, suggesting the existence of silicates in the IPD material. The spectral shape of the zodiacal light is isotropic at all ecliptic latitudes within the measurement error. The zodiacal light spectrum, including the extended wavelength range to 2500 nm using IRTS data, is qualitatively similar to the reflectance of S-type asteroids. This result can be explained by the proximity of S-type asteroidal dust to Earth's orbit, and the relativily high albedo of asteridal dust compared with cometary dust.
  • We derive generic relativistic hydrodynamical equations with dissipative effects from the underlying Boltzmann equation in a mechanical and systematic way on the basis of so called the renormalization-group (RG) method. A macroscopic frame vector is introduced to specify the frame on which the macroscopic dynamics is described. Our method is so mechanical with only few ansatz that our method give a microscopic foundation of the available hydrodynamical equations, and also can be applied to make a reduction of the kinetic equations other than the simple Boltzmann equation.
  • J/Psi and eta_c above the QCD critical temperature T_c are studied in anisotropic quenched lattice QCD, considering whether the c\bar c systems above T_c are spatially compact (quasi-)bound states or scattering states. We adopt the standard Wilson gauge action and O(a)-improved Wilson quark action with renormalized anisotropy a_s/a_t =4.0 at \beta=6.10 on 16^3\times (14-26) lattices, which correspond to the spatial lattice volume V\equiv L^3\simeq(1.55{\rm fm})^3 and temperatures T\simeq(1.11-2.07)T_c. We investigate the c\bar c system above T_c from the temporal correlators with spatially-extended operators, where the overlap with the ground state is enhanced. To clarify whether compact charmonia survive in the deconfinement phase, we investigate spatial boundary-condition dependence of the energy of c\bar c systems above T_c. In fact, for low-lying S-wave c \bar c scattering states, it is expected that there appears a significant energy difference \Delta E \equiv E{\rm (APBC)}-E{\rm (PBC)}\simeq2\sqrt{m_c^2+3\pi^2/L^2}-2m_c (m_c: charm quark mass) between periodic and anti-periodic boundary conditions on the finite-volume lattice. In contrast, for compact charmonia, there is no significant energy difference between periodic and anti-periodic boundary conditions. As a lattice QCD result, almost no spatial boundary-condition dependence is observed for the energy of the c\bar c system in J/\Psi and \eta_c channels for T\simeq(1.11-2.07)T_c. This fact indicates that J/\Psi and \eta_c would survive as spatially compact c\bar c (quasi-)bound states below 2T_c. We also investigate a $P$-wave channel at high temperature with maximally entropy method (MEM) and find no low-lying peak structure corresponding to \chi_{c1} at 1.62T_c.
  • In the framework of the minimum supersymmetric model with right-handed neutrinos, we consider the Bi-maximal mixing which is realized at the GUT scale and discuss a question that this model can reproduce the low energy phenomena and the leptogenesis.
  • We estimate the magnitude of Lepton Flavour Violation (LFV) from the phase of the neutrino Yukawa matrix. In the minimal supersymmetric standard model with right-handed neutrinos, the LFV processes l_i \to l_j \gamma can appear through the slepton mixing, which comes from the renormalization group effect on the right-handed neutrino Yukawa interaction between the Grand Unified Theory scale and the heavy right-handed neutrino mass scale. Two types of phases exist in the neutrino Yukawa matrix. One is the Majorana phase, which can change the magnitude of the LFV branching ratios by a few factor. The other phases relate for the size of the Yukawa hierarchy and its phase effect can change the LFV branching ratios by several orders of magnitude.
  • We analyze the phase effect of the neutrino Yukawa matrix in the context of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with right-handed neutrinos. Its effect can change the Lepton Flavor Violation branching ratios by a few order of magnitude.