• The Ophiuchus stellar stream presents a dynamical puzzle: its old stellar populations ($\sim 12$ Gyr) cannot be reconciled with (1) its orbit in a simple model for the Milky Way potential and (2) its short angular extent, both of which imply that the observed stream formed within the last $<1$ Gyr. Recent theoretical work has shown that streams on chaotic orbits may abruptly fan out near their apparent ends; stars in these fans are dispersed in both position and velocity and may be difficult to associate with the stream. Here we present the first evidence of such stream-fanning in the Ophiuchus stream, traced by four blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars beyond the apparent end of the stream. These stars stand out from the background by their high velocities ($v_{\rm los} > 230$ km s$^{-1}$) against $\sim 40$ other stars: their velocities are comparable to those of the stream, but would be exceptional if they were unrelated halo stars. Their positions and velocities are, however, inconsistent with simple extrapolation of the observed cold, high-density portion of the stream. These observations suggest that stream-fanning may be a real, observable effect and, therefore, that Ophiuchus may be on a chaotic orbit. They also show that the Ophiuchus stream is more extended and hence dynamically older than previously thought, easing the stellar population vs. dynamical age tension.
  • Tidal streams are a powerful probe of the Milky Way (MW) potential shape. In this paper, we introduce a simple test particle method to fit stream data, using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to marginalise over uncertainties in the progenitor's orbit and the Milky Way halo shape parameters. Applying it to mock data of thin streams in the MW halo, we show that, even for very cold streams, stream-orbit offsets - not modelled in our simple method - introduce systematic biases in the recovered shape parameters. For the streams that we consider, and our particular choice of potential parameterisation, these errors are of order ~20% on the halo flattening parameters. However, larger systematic errors can arise for more general streams and potentials; such offsets need to be correctly modelled in order to obtain an unbiased recovery of the underlying potential. Assessing which of the known Milky Way streams are most constraining, we find NGC 5466 and Pal 5 are the most promising candidates. These form an interesting pair as their orbital planes are both approximately perpendicular to each other and to the disc, giving optimal constraints on the MW halo shape. We show that - while with current data their constraints on potential parameters are poor - good radial velocity data along the Pal 5 stream will provide constraints on qz - the flattening perpendicular to the disc. Furthermore, as discussed in a companion paper, NGC 5466 can provide rather strong constraints on the MW halo shape parameters, if the tentative evidence for a departure from the smooth orbit towards its western edge is confirmed.
  • NGC 205, a close satellite of the M31 galaxy, is our nearest example of a dwarf elliptical galaxy. Photometric and kinematic observations suggest that NGC 205 is undergoing tidal distortion from its interaction with M31. Despite earlier attempts, the orbit and progenitor properties of NGC 205 are not well known. We perform an optimized search for these unknowns by combining a genetic algorithm with restricted N-body simulations of the interaction. This approach, coupled with photometric and kinematic observations as constraints, allows for an effective exploration of the parameter space. We represent NGC 205 as a static Hernquist potential with embedded massless test particles that serve as tracers of surface brightness. We explore 3 distinct, initially stable configurations of test particles: cold rotating disk, warm rotating disk, and hot, pressure-supported spheroid. Each model reproduces some, but not all, of the observed features of NGC 205, leading us to speculate that a rotating progenitor with substantial pressure support could match all of the observables. Furthermore, plausible combinations of mass and scale length for the pressure-supported spheroid progenitor model reproduce the observed velocity dispersion profile. For all 3 models, orbits that best match the observables place the satellite 11+/-9 kpc behind M31 moving at very large velocities: 300-500 km/s on primarily radial orbits. Given that the observed radial component is only 54 km/s, this implies a large tangential motion for NGC 205, moving from the NW to the SE. These results suggest NGC 205 is not associated with the stellar arc observed to the NE of NGC 205. Furthermore, NGC 205's velocity appears to be near or greater than its escape velocity, signifying that the satellite is likely on its first M31 passage.
  • We present the largest and most detailed survey to date of the stellar populations in the outskirts of M31 based on the analysis of 14 deep HST/ACS pointings spanning the range 11.5-45.0 kpc. We conduct a quantitative comparison of the resolved stellar populations in these fields and identify several striking trends. The color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), which reach ~3 magnitudes below the red clump, can be classified into two main categories based on their morphologies. `Stream-like' fields, so named for their similarity to the CMD of the giant stellar stream, are characterized by a red clump that slants bluewards at fainter magnitudes and an extended horizontal branch. On the other hand, `disk-like' fields exhibit rounder red clumps with significant luminosity width, lack an obvious horizontal branch and show evidence for recent star formation (~0.25 - 2.0 Gyr ago). We compare the spatial and line-of-sight distribution of stream-like fields with a recent simulation of the giant stream progenitor orbit and find an excellent agreement. These fields, found across the face of M31, attest to the high degree of pollution caused by this event. Disk-like material resides in the extended disk structure of M31 and is detected out to 44 kpc (projected); the uniform populations in these fields, including the ubiquitous presence of young populations, and the strong rotation reported elsewhere are most consistent with a scenario in which this structure has formed through heating and disruption of the existing thin disk, perhaps due to the impact of the giant stream progenitor. Our comparative analysis sheds new light on the likely composition of two of the ultra-deep pointings formerly presented as pure outer disk and pure halo in the literature.
  • We present a wide-field (4.5 deg^2) photometric and spectroscopic survey of the Leo I dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy to explore its extended morphology and dynamics. As in previous papers in this series, we take advantage of photometry in the M, T_2, and DDO51 filter system to select LeoI red giant branch star candidates, and, so far, this selection technique has proven 100% reliable in selecting actual Leo I members among more than 100 M < 21.5 Leo I giant candidates having previous or new Keck DEIMOS spectroscopy to a radius >1.3 times the limiting radius of the fitted, central King profile. The two-dimensional distribution of all similarly-selected Leo I giant candidates is well fitted by a central single-component King profile of limiting radius 13.3 arcmin, but many giant stars are found outside this newly derived King limiting radius. The density profile thus shows a break at a major axis radial distance of ~10 arcmin produced by an excess of stars at and beyond the King limiting radius (spectroscopically confirmed to be made of true Leo I members), and primarily along the major axis of the main body of the rather elongated satellite. This spatial configuration, a rather flat velocity dispersion profile and an asymmetric radial velocity (RV) distribution among the Leo I members at large radii together support a picture where Leo I has been tidally disrupted on at least one, but at most two, perigalactic passages of a massive Local Group member. (abridged)