• We present a catalog of 5324 massive stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), with accurate spectral types compiled from the literature, and a photometric catalog for a subset of 3654 of these stars, with the goal of exploring their infrared properties. The photometric catalog consists of stars with infrared counterparts in the Spitzer, SAGE-SMC survey database, for which we present uniform photometry from 0.3-24 um in the UBVIJHKs+IRAC+MIPS24 bands. We compare the color magnitude diagrams and color-color diagrams to those of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), finding that the brightest infrared sources in the SMC are also the red supergiants, supergiant B[e] (sgB[e]) stars, luminous blue variables, and Wolf-Rayet stars, with the latter exhibiting less infrared excess, the red supergiants being less dusty and the sgB[e] stars being on average less luminous. Among the objects detected at 24 um are a few very luminous hypergiants, 4 B-type stars with peculiar, flat spectral energy distributions, and all 3 known luminous blue variables. We detect a distinct Be star sequence, displaced to the red, and suggest a novel method of confirming Be star candidates photometrically. We find a higher fraction of Oe and Be stars among O and early-B stars in the SMC, respectively, when compared to the LMC, and that the SMC Be stars occur at higher luminosities. We estimate mass-loss rates for the red supergiants, confirming the correlation with luminosity even at the metallicity of the SMC. Finally, we confirm the new class of stars displaying composite A & F type spectra, the sgB[e] nature of 2dFS1804 and find the F0 supergiant 2dFS3528 to be a candidate luminous blue variable with cold dust.
  • We present Spitzer observations of the unusual variable V838 Monocerotis. Extended emission is detected around the object at 24, 70 and 160um. The extended infrared emission is strongly correlated spatially with the HST optical light echo images taken at a similar epoch. We attribute this diffuse nebulosity to be from an infrared light echo caused by reprocessed thermal emission from dust heated by the outward-propagating radiation from the 2002 eruption. The detection of an IR light echo provides an opportunity to estimate the mass in dust of the echo material and hence constrain its origin. We estimate the dust mass of the light echo to be on the order of a solar mass - thereby implying the total gas plus dust mass to be considerably more - too massive for the echo material to be the ejecta from previous outburst/mass-losing events. This is therefore suggestive that a significant fraction of the matter seen through the light echo is interstellar in origin. Unresolved emission at 24 and 70um is also seen at the position of the central star possibly indicating the presence of hot dust freshly condensed in the outburst ejecta.
  • The dust in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), an ideal analog of primordial galaxies at high redshifts, differs markedly from that in the Milky Way by exhibiting a steeply rising far-ultraviolet extinction curve, an absence of the 2175 Angstrom extinction feature, and a local minimum at ~12 micron in its infrared emission spectrum, suggesting the lack of ultrasmall carbonaceous grains (i.e. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules) which are ubiquitously seen in the Milky Way. While current models for the SMC dust all rely heavily on silicates, recent observations of the SMC sightline toward Sk 155 indicated that Si and Mg are essentially undepleted and the depletions of Fe range from mild to severe, suggesting that metallic grains and/or iron oxides, instead of silicates, may dominate the SMC dust. However, in this Letter we apply the Kramers-Kronig relation to demonstrate that neither metallic grains nor iron oxides are capable of accounting for the observed extinction; silicates remain as an important contributor to the extinction, consistent with current models for the SMC dust.
  • We present Spitzer observations in five wavebands between 3.6 and 24um of an unbiased sample of 9 luminous, dusty galaxies selected at 1200um by the MAMBO camera on the IRAM 30-m telescope, a population akin to the well-known submm or `SCUBA' galaxies (hereafter SMGs). Owing to the coarse resolution of submm/mm instrumentation, SMGs have traditionally been difficult to identify at other wavelengths. We compare our multi-wavelength catalogs to show that the overlap between 24 and 1200um must be close to complete at these flux levels. We find that all (4/4) of the most secure >=4sigma SMGs have robust >=4sigma counterparts at 1.4GHz, while the fraction drops to 7/9 using all >=3sigma SMGs. We show that combining mid-IR and marginal (>=3sigma) radio detections provides plausible identifications in the remaining cases, enabling us to identify the complete sample. Accretion onto an obscured central engine is betrayed by the shape of the mid-IR continuum emission for several sources, confirming Spitzer's potential to weed out active galaxies. We demonstrate the power of a S(24um)/S(8um) vs S(8um)/S(4.5um) color-color plot as a diagnostic for this purpose. However, we conclude that the majority (~75%) of SMGs have rest-frame mid-/far-IR SEDs commensurate with obscured starbursts. Sensitive 24-um observations are clearly a useful route to identify and characterize reliable counterparts to high-redshift far-IR-bright galaxies, complementing what is possible via deep radio imaging.
  • We present sub-millimeter statistical detections of galaxies discovered in the 5'x5' Spitzer Early Release Observations (to 4-15 microJy 5 sigma at 3.6-8 microns, 170 microJy at 24 microns) through a stacking analysis of our reanalysed SCUBA 8mJy survey maps, and a Spitzer identification of a new sub-millimeter point source in the 8mJy survey region. For sources detected at 5.8 or 8 microns (154 and 111 sources respectively), we detect positive skews in the sub-millimeter flux distributions at 99.2-99.8% confidence using Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, at both 850 microns and 450 microns. We also marginally detect the Spitzer 24 micron galaxies at 850 microns at 97% confidence, and place limits on the mean sub-millimeter fluxes of the 3.6 and 4.5 micron sources. Integrating the sub-millimeter fluxes of the Spitzer populations, we find the 5.8 micron galaxies contribute 0.12 +/- 0.05 nW/m^2/sr to the 850 micron background, and 2.4 +/- 0.7 nW/m^2/sr to the 450 micron background; similar contributions are made by the 8 micron-selected sample. We infer that the populations dominating the 5.8 and 8 micron extragalactic background light also contribute around a quarter of the 850 micron background and the majority of the 450 micron background.
  • We report the discovery of eight new R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the MACHO project photometry database. The discovery of these new stars increases the number of known RCB stars in the LMC to thirteen. We have also discovered four stars similar to the Galactic variable DY Per. These stars decline much more slowly and are cooler than the RCB stars. The absolute luminosities of the Galactic RCB stars are unknown since there is no direct measurement of the distance to any Galactic RCB star. Hence, the importance of the LMC RCB stars. We find a much larger range of absolute magnitudes (M(V) = -2.5 to -5 mag) than inferred from the small pre-MACHO sample of LMC RCB stars. It is likely that there is a temperature - M(V)relationship with the cooler stars being intrinsically fainter. Cool (~5000 K) RCB stars are much more common than previously thought based on the Galactic RCB star sample. Using the fairly complete sample of RCB stars discovered in the MACHO fields, we have estimated the likely number of RCB stars in the Galaxy to be ~3,200. The SMC MACHO fields were also searched for RCB stars but none were found.