• We observed an arch filament system (AFS) in a sunspot group with the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph attached to the GREGOR solar telescope. The AFS was located between the leading sunspot of negative polarity and several pores of positive polarity forming the following part of the sunspot group. We recorded five spectro-polarimetric scans of this region. The spectral range included the spectral lines Si I 1082.7 nm, He I 1083.0 nm, and Ca I 1083.9 nm. In this work we concentrate on the silicon line which is formed in the upper photosphere. The line profiles are inverted with the code `Stokes Inversion based on Response functions' to obtain the magnetic field vector. The line-of-sight velocities are determined independently with a Fourier phase method. Maximum velocities are found close to the ends of AFS fibrils. These maximum values amount to 2.4 km/s next to the pores and to 4 km/s at the sunspot side. Between the following pores, we encounter an area of negative polarity that is decreasing during the five scans. We interpret this by new emerging positive flux in this area canceling out the negative flux. In summary, our findings confirm the scenario that rising magnetic flux tubes cause the AFS.
  • Brightness inhomogeneities in the stellar photosphere (dark spots or bright regions) affect the measurements of the planetary transmission spectrum. To investigate the star spots of the M dwarf GJ 1214, we conducted a multicolor photometric monitoring from 2012 to 2016. The measured variability shows a periodicity of 125 +- 5 days, which we interpret as the signature of the stellar rotation period. This value overrules previous suggestions of a significantly shorter stellar rotation period. A light curve inversion of the monitoring data yields an estimation of the flux dimming of a permanent spot filling factor not contributing to the photometric variability, a temperature contrast of the spots of about 370 K and persistent active longitudes. The derived surface maps over all five seasons were used to estimate the influence of the star spots on the transmission spectrum of the planet from 400 nm to 2000 nm. The monitoring data presented here do not support a recent interpretation of a measured transmission spectrum of GJ 1214b as to be caused by bright regions in the stellar photosphere. Instead, we list arguments as to why the effect of dark spots likely dominated over bright regions in the period of our monitoring. Furthermore, our photometry proves an increase in variability over at least four years, indicative for a cyclic activity behavior. The age of GJ 1214 is likely between 6 and 10 Gyr. The long-term photometry allows for a correction of unocculted spots. For an active star such as GJ 1214, there remains a degeneracy between occulted spots and the transit parameters used to build the transmission spectrum. This degeneracy can only be broken by high-precision transit photometry resolving the spot crossing signature in the transit light curve.
  • From our sample of spotted late-type stars showing surface differential rotation we find that the relationship between the rotation period and the surface shear coefficient $\alpha=\Delta\Omega/\Omega_{\rm eq}$ is significantly different for single stars compared to members in close binaries. Single stars follow a general trend that $\alpha$ increases with the rotation period. However, differential rotation of stars in close binary systems shows much weaker dependence on the rotation, if any, suggesting that in such systems tidal forces operate as a controlling mechanism of differential rotation.
  • Deciphering the assembly history of the Milky Way is a formidable task, which becomes possible only if one can produce high-resolution chrono-chemo-kinematical maps of the Galaxy. Data from large-scale astrometric and spectroscopic surveys will soon provide us with a well-defined view of the current chemo-kinematical structure of the Milky Way, but will only enable a blurred view on the temporal sequence that led to the present-day Galaxy. As demonstrated by the (ongoing) exploitation of data from the pioneering photometric missions CoRoT, Kepler, and K2, asteroseismology provides the way forward: solar-like oscillating giants are excellent evolutionary clocks thanks to the availability of seismic constraints on their mass and to the tight age-initial-mass relation they adhere to. In this paper we identify five key outstanding questions relating to the formation and evolution of the Milky Way that will need precise and accurate ages for large samples of stars to be addressed, and we identify the requirements in terms of number of targets and the precision on the stellar properties that are needed to tackle such questions. By quantifying the asteroseismic yields expected from PLATO for red-giant stars, we demonstrate that these requirements are within the capabilities of the current instrument design, provided that observations are sufficiently long to identify the evolutionary state and allow robust and precise determination of acoustic-mode frequencies. This will allow us to harvest data of sufficient quality to reach a 10% precision in age. This is a fundamental pre-requisite to then reach the more ambitious goal of a similar level of accuracy, which will only be possible if we have to hand a careful appraisal of systematic uncertainties on age deriving from our limited understanding of stellar physics, a goal which conveniently falls within the main aims of PLATO's core science.
  • A new generation of solar instruments provides improved spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution, thus facilitating a better understanding of dynamic processes on the Sun. High-resolution observations often reveal multiple-component spectral line profiles, e.g., in the near-infrared He I 10830 \AA\ triplet, which provides information about the chromospheric velocity and magnetic fine structure. We observed an emerging flux region, including two small pores and an arch filament system, on 2015 April 17 with the 'very fast spectroscopic mode' of the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS) situated at the 1.5-meter GREGOR solar telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. We discuss this method of obtaining fast (one per minute) spectral scans of the solar surface and its potential to follow dynamic processes on the Sun. We demonstrate the performance of the 'very fast spectroscopic mode' by tracking chromospheric high-velocity features in the arch filament system.
  • Magnetic fields are essential ingredients of many physical processes in the interiors and envelopes of cool stars. Yet their direct detection and characterisation is notoriously difficult, requiring high-quality observations and advanced analysis techniques. Significant progress has been recently achieved by several types of direct magnetic field studies on the surfaces of cool active stars. In particular, complementary techniques of the field topology mapping with polarisation data and total magnetic flux measurements from intensity spectra have been systematically applied to different classes of active stars leading to interesting and occasionally controversial results. In this paper we summarise the current status of direct magnetic field studies of cool stars, and investigations of surface inhomogeneities caused by the field, based on the material presented at the Cool Stars 19 splinter session.
  • Arch filament systems occur in active sunspot groups, where a fibril structure connects areas of opposite magnetic polarity, in contrast to active region filaments that follow the polarity inversion line. We used the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS) to obtain the full Stokes vector in the spectral lines Si I 1082.7 nm, He I 1083.0 nm, and Ca I 1083.9 nm. We focus on the near-infrared calcium line to investigate the photospheric magnetic field and velocities, and use the line core intensities and velocities of the helium line to study the chromospheric plasma. The individual fibrils of the arch filament system connect the sunspot with patches of magnetic polarity opposite to that of the spot. These patches do not necessarily coincide with pores, where the magnetic field is strongest. Instead, areas are preferred not far from the polarity inversion line. These areas exhibit photospheric downflows of moderate velocity, but significantly higher downflows of up to 30 km/s in the chromospheric helium line. Our findings can be explained with new emerging flux where the matter flows downward along the fieldlines of rising flux tubes, in agreement with earlier results.
  • Some models for the topology of the magnetic field in sunspot penumbrae predict the existence of field-free or dynamically weak-field regions in the deep Photosphere. To confirm or rule out the existence of weak-field regions in the deepest photospheric layers of the penumbra. The magnetic field at $\log\tau_5=0$ is investigated by means of inversions of spectropolarimetric data of two different sunspots located very close to disk center with a spatial resolution of approximately 0.4-0.45 arcsec. The data have been recorded using the GRIS instrument attached to the 1.5-meters GREGOR solar telescope at El Teide observatory. It includes three Fe I lines around 1565 nm, whose sensitivity to the magnetic field peaks at half a pressure-scale-height deeper than the sensitivity of the widely used Fe I spectral line pair at 630 nm. Prior to the inversion, the data is corrected for the effects of scattered light using a deconvolution method with several point spread functions. At $\log\tau_5=0$ we find no evidence for the existence of regions with dynamically weak ($B<500$ Gauss) magnetic fields in sunspot penumbrae. This result is much more reliable than previous investigations done with Fe I lines at 630 nm. Moreover, the result is independent of the number of nodes employed in the inversion, and also independent of the point spread function used to deconvolve the data, and does not depend on the amount of straylight (i.e. wide-angle scattered light) considered.
  • Aims. Combining high-resolution and synoptic observations aims to provide a comprehensive description of flux emergence at photospheric level and of the growth process that eventually leads to a mature active region. Methods. Small active region NOAA 12118 was observed on 2014 July 18 with the 1.5-meter GREGOR solar telescope on 2014 July 18. High-resolution time-series of blue continuum and G-band images acquired in the blue imaging channel (BIC) of the GREGOR Fabry-P\'erot Interferometer (GFPI) were complemented by LOS magnetograms and continuum images obtained with the HMI onboard the SDO. Horizontal proper motions and horizontal plasma velocities were computed with local correlation tracking (LCT) and the differential affine velocity estimator, respectively. Morphological image processing was employed to measure the photometric/magnetic area, magnetic flux, and the separation profile of the EFR during its evolution. Results. The computed growth rates for photometric area, magnetic area, and magnetic flux are about twice as high as the respective decay rates. The space-time diagram using HMI magnetograms of five days traces a leaf-like structure, which is determined by the initial separation of the two polarities, a rapid expansion phase, a time when the spread stalls, and a period when the region slowly shrinks again. The separation rate of 0.26 km\s is highest in the initial stage, and it decreases when the separation comes to a halt. Horizontal plasma velocities computed at four evolutionary stages indicate a changing pattern of inflows. In LCT maps we find persistent flow patterns such as outward motions in the outer part of the two major pores, a diverging feature near the trailing pore marking the site of upwelling plasma and flux emergence, and low velocities in the interior of pores. We detected many elongated rapidly expanding granules between the two major polarities.
  • Accurate measurements of magnetic and velocity fields in and around solar active regions are key to unlocking the mysteries of the formation and the decay of sunspots. High spatial resolution image and spectral sequences with a high cadence obtained with the GREGOR solar telescope give us an opportunity to scrutinize 3-D flow fields with local correlation tracking and imaging spectroscopy. We present GREGOR early science data acquired in 2014 July - August with the GREGOR Fabry-P\'erot Interferometer and the Blue Imaging Channel. Time-series of blue continuum (? 450.6 nm) images of the small active region NOAA 12118 were restored with the speckle masking technique to derive horizontal proper motions and to track the evolution of morphological changes. In addition, high-resolution observations are discussed in the context of synoptic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory.
  • The new generation of solar instruments provides better spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution for a better understanding of the physical processes that take place on the Sun. Multiple-component profiles are more commonly observed with these instruments. Particularly, the He I 10830 \r{A} triplet presents such peculiar spectral profiles, which give information on the velocity and magnetic fine structure of the upper chromosphere. The purpose of this investigation is to describe a technique to efficiently fit the two blended components of the He I 10830 \r{A} triplet, which are commonly observed when two atmospheric components are located within the same resolution element. The observations used in this study were taken on 2015 April 17 with the very fast spectroscopic mode of the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS) attached to the 1.5-meter GREGOR solar telescope, located at the Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. We apply a double-Lorentzian fitting technique using Levenberg-Marquardt least-squares minimization. This technique is very simple and much faster than inversion codes. Line-of-sight Doppler velocities can be inferred for a whole map of pixels within just a few minutes. Our results show sub- and supersonic downflow velocities of up to 32 km/s for the fast component in the vicinity of footpoints of filamentary structures. The slow component presents velocities close to rest.
  • PEPSI is the bench-mounted, two-arm, fibre-fed and stabilized Potsdam Echelle Polarimetric and Spectroscopic Instrument for the 2x8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). Three spectral resolutions of either 43 000, 120 000 or 270 000 can cover the entire optical/red wavelength range from 383 to 907 nm in three exposures. Two 10.3kx10.3k CCDs with 9-{\mu}m pixels and peak quantum efficiencies of 96 % record a total of 92 echelle orders. We introduce a new variant of a wave-guide image slicer with 3, 5, and 7 slices and peak efficiencies between 96 %. A total of six cross dispersers cover the six wavelength settings of the spectrograph, two of them always simultaneously. These are made of a VPH-grating sandwiched by two prisms. The peak efficiency of the system, including the telescope, is 15% at 650 nm, and still 11% and 10% at 390 nm and 900 nm, respectively. In combination with the 110 m2 light-collecting capability of the LBT, we expect a limiting magnitude of 20th mag in V in the low-resolution mode. The R=120 000 mode can also be used with two, dual-beam Stokes IQUV polarimeters. The 270 000-mode is made possible with the 7-slice image slicer and a 100- {\mu}m fibre through a projected sky aperture of 0.74", comparable to the median seeing of the LBT site. The 43000-mode with 12-pixel sampling per resolution element is our bad seeing or faint-object mode. Any of the three resolution modes can either be used with sky fibers for simultaneous sky exposures or with light from a stabilized Fabry-Perot etalon for ultra-precise radial velocities. CCD-image processing is performed with the dedicated data-reduction and analysis package PEPSI-S4S. A solar feed makes use of PEPSI during day time and a 500-m feed from the 1.8 m VATT can be used when the LBT is busy otherwise. In this paper, we present the basic instrument design, its realization, and its characteristics.
  • The (Zeeman-)Doppler imaging studies of solar-type stars very often reveal large high-latitude spots. This also includes F stars that possess relatively shallow convection zones, indicating that the dynamo operating in these stars differs from the solar dynamo. We aim to determine whether mean-field dynamo models of late-F type dwarf stars can reproduce the surface features recovered in Doppler maps. In particular, we wish to test whether the models can reproduce the high-latitude spots observed on some F dwarfs. The photometric inversions and the surface temperature maps of AF Lep were obtained using the Occamian-approach inversion technique. Low signal-to-noise spectroscopic data were improved by applying the least-squares deconvolution method. The locations of strong magnetic flux in the stellar tachocline as well as the surface fields obtained from mean-field dynamo solutions were compared with the observed surface temperature maps. The photometric record of AF Lep reveals both long- and short-term variability. However, the current data set is too short for cycle-length estimates. From the photometry, we have determined the rotation period of the star to be 0.9660+-0.0023 days. The surface temperature maps show a dominant, but evolving, high-latitude (around +65 degrees) spot. Detailed study of the photometry reveals that sometimes the spot coverage varies only marginally over a long time, and at other times it varies rapidly. Of a suite of dynamo models, the model with a radiative interior rotating as fast as the convection zone at the equator delivered the highest compatibility with the obtained Doppler images.
  • Context. Surface differential rotation and other global surface flows on magnetically active stars are among the observable manifestations of the stellar dynamo working underneath. Therefore, such observations are important for stellar dynamo theory and useful constraints for solar dynamo studies as well. Aims. The active K1-giant component of the long-period RS CVn-type binary system sigma Gem and its global surface flow pattern is revisited. Methods. We refine the differential rotation law from recovering the spot migration pattern. We apply a detailed cross-correlation technique to a unique set of 34 time-series Doppler images recovered using data from 1996/97. By increasing the number of the available cross-correlation function maps from the formerly used 4 to 17 we expect a more robust determination of the differential surface rotation law. In addition, we present a new time-series Doppler imaging study of sigma Gem using our advanced surface reconstruction code iMap for a dataset collected in 2006/07. Results. Results from the reprocessed cross-correlation study confirm that the star performs antisolar-type differential rotation with a surface shear alpha of -0.04 +/- 0.01, i.e., almost a factor of two stronger compared to the previously claimed value. We also confirm the evidence of a global poleward spot migration with an average velocity of 0.21 +/- 0.03 km/s, in accordance with theoretical predictions. From the new observations we obtain three subsequent Doppler images. The time evolution of these images confirms the antisolar-type differential rotation of the same amount.
  • We study three representative, overactive spotted K giants (IL Hya, XX Tri, and DM UMa) known to exhibit V-band light variations between 0.65-1.05 mags. Our aim is to find the origin of their large brightness variation. We employ long-term phase-resolved multicolor photometry, mostly from automatic telescopes, covering 42 yr for IL Hya, 28 yr for XX Tri, and 34 yr for DM UMa. For one target, IL Hya, we present a new Doppler image from NSO data taken in late 1996. Effective temperatures for our targets are determined from all well-sampled observing epochs and are based on a V-I_C color-index calibration. The effective temperature change between the extrema of the rotational modulation for IL Hya and XX Tri is in the range 50-200 K. The bolometric flux during maximum of the rotational modulation, i.e., the least spotted states, varied by up to 39% in IL Hya and up to 54% in XX Tri over the course of our observations. We emphasize that for IL Hya this is just about half of the total luminosity variation that can be explained by the photospheric temperature (spots/faculae) changes, while for XX Tri it is even about one third. The long-term, 0.6 mag V-band variation of DM UMa is more difficult to explain because little or no B-V color index change is observed on the same timescale. Placing the three stars with their light and color variations into H-R diagrams, we find that their overall luminosities are generally too low compared to predictions from current evolutionary tracks. A change in the stellar radius due to strong and variable magnetic fields during activity cycles likely plays a role in explaining the anomalous brightness and luminosity of our three targets. At least for IL Hya, a radius change of about 9% is suggested from m_bol and T_eff, and is supported by independent vsin(i) measurements.
  • In the recent years, we have seen a rapidly growing number of stellar magnetic field detections for various types of stars. Many of these magnetic fields are estimated from spectropolarimetric observations (Stokes V) by using the so-called center-of-gravity (COG) method. Unfortunately, the accuracy of this method rapidly deteriorates with increasing noise and thus calls for a more robust procedure that combines signal detection and field estimation. We introduce an estimation method that provides not only the effective or mean longitudinal magnetic field from an observed Stokes V profile but also uses the net absolute polarization of the profile to obtain an estimate of the apparent (i.e., velocity resolved) absolute longitudinal magnetic field. By combining the COG method with an orthogonal-matching-pursuit (OMP) approach, we were able to decompose observed Stokes profiles with an overcomplete dictionary of wavelet-basis functions to reliably reconstruct the observed Stokes profiles in the presence of noise. The elementary wave functions of the sparse reconstruction process were utilized to estimate the effective longitudinal magnetic field and the apparent absolute longitudinal magnetic field. A multiresolution analysis complements the OMP algorithm to provide a robust detection and estimation method. An extensive Monte-Carlo simulation confirms the reliability and accuracy of the magnetic OMP approach.
  • In this review, we look back upon the literature, which had the GREGOR solar telescope project as its subject including science cases, telescope subsystems, and post-focus instruments. The articles date back to the year 2000, when the initial concepts for a new solar telescope on Tenerife were first presented at scientific meetings. This comprehensive bibliography contains literature until the year 2012, i.e., the final stages of commissioning and science verification. Taking stock of the various publications in peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings also provides the "historical" context for the reference articles in this special issue of Astronomische Nachrichten/Astronomical Notes.
  • We study the time variations of the cycles of 20 active stars based on decades-long photometric or spectroscopic observations. A method of time-frequency analysis, as discussed in a companion paper, is applied to the data. Fifteen stars definitely show multiple cycles; the records of the rest are too short to verify a timescale for a second cycle. The cycles typically show systematic changes. For three stars, we found two cycles in each of them that are not harmonics, and which vary in parallel, indicating that a common physical mechanism arising from a dynamo construct. The positive relation between the rotational and cycle periods is confirmed for the inhomogeneous set of active stars. Stellar activity cycles are generally multiple and variable.
  • We present Zeeman-Doppler images of the active K2 star II Peg for the years 2004 and 2007. The surface magnetic field was reconstructed with our new ZDI code "iMap" which provides a full polarized radiative transfer driven inversion to simultaneously reconstruct the surface temperature and magnetic vector field distribution. II Peg shows a remarkable large scale magnetic field structure for both years. The magnetic field is predominantly located at high latitudes and is arranged in active longitudes. A dramatic evolution in the magnetic field structure is visible for the two years, where a dominant and largely unipolar field in 2004 has developed into two distinct and large scale bipolar structures in 2007.
  • Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (ZDI) is a powerful inversion method to reconstruct stellar magnetic surface fields. The reconstruction process is usually solved by translating the inverse problem into a regularized least-square or optimization problem. In this contribution we will emphasize that ZDI is an inherent non-linear problem and the corresponding regularized optimization is, like many non-linear problems, potentially prone to local minima. We show how this problem will be exacerbated by using an inadequate forward model. To facilitate a more consistent full radiative transfer driven approach to ZDI we describe a two-stage strategy that consist of a principal component analysis (PCA) based line profile reconstruction and a fast approximate polarized radiative transfer method to synthesize local Stokes profiles. Moreover, we introduce a novel statistical inversion method based on artificial neural networks (ANN) which provide a fast calculation of a first guess model and allows to incorporate better physical constraints into the inversion process.
  • Late-type stars in general possess complicated magnetic surface fields which makes their detection and in particular their modeling and reconstruction challenging. In this work we present a new Zeeman-Doppler imaging code which is especially designed for the application to late-type stars. This code uses a new multi-line cross-correlation technique by means of a principal component analysis to extract and enhance the quality of individual polarized line profiles. It implements the full polarized radiative transfer equation and uses an inversion strategy that can incorporate prior knowledge based on solar analogies. Moreover, our code utilizes a new regularization scheme which is based on local maximum entropy to allow a more appropriate reproduction of complex surface fields as those expected for late-type stars. In a first application we present Zeeman-Doppler images of II Pegasi which reveal a surprisingly large scale surface structure with one predominant (unipolar) magnetic longitude which is mainly radially oriented.
  • We describe and summarize the optical challenges for future instrumentation for Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). Knowing the complex instrumental requirements is crucial for the successful design of 30-60m aperture telescopes. After all, the success of ELTs will heavily rely on its instrumentation and this, in turn, will depend on the ability to produce large and ultra-precise optical components like light-weight mirrors, aspheric lenses, segmented filters, and large gratings. New materials and manufacturing processes are currently under study, both at research institutes and in industry. In the present paper, we report on its progress with particular emphasize on volume-phase-holographic gratings, photochromic materials, sintered silicon-carbide mirrors, ion-beam figuring, ultra-precision surfaces, and free-form optics. All are promising technologies opening new degrees of freedom to optical designers. New optronic-mechanical systems will enable efficient use of the very large focal planes. We also provide exploratory descriptions of "old" and "new" optical technologies together with suggestions to instrument designers to overcome some of the challenges placed by ELT instrumentation.
  • A way to fully exploit the large collecting area of modern 8-10m class telescopes is high resolution spectroscopy. Many astrophysical problems from planetary science to cosmology benefit from spectroscopic observations at the highest resolution currently achievable and would benefit from even higher resolutions. Indeed in the era of 8-10m class telescopes no longer the telescope collecting area but the size of the beam - which is related to the maximum size in which reflection gratings are manufactured - is what mainly limits the resolution. A resolution-slit product Rphi ~ 40,000 is the maximum currently provided by a beam of 20 cm illuminating the largest grating mosaics. We present a conceptual design for a spectrograph with Rphi ~ 80,000, i.e. twice as large as that of existing instruments. Examples of the possible exploitation of such a high Rphi value, including spectropolarimetry and very high resolution (R ~ 300,000), are discussed in detail. The new concept is illustrated through the specific case of a high resolution spectropolarimeter for the Large Binocular Telescope.
  • We present temperature maps of the active late-type giant FK Com which exhibit the first imagining record of the ``flip-flop'' phenomenon in a single star. The phenomenon, in which the main part of the spot activity shifts 180 degrees in longitude, discovered a decade ago in FK Com, was reported later also in a number of RS CVn binaries and a single young dwarf. With the surface images obtained right before and after the ``flip-flop'', we clearly show that the ``flip-flop'' phenomenon in FK Com is caused by changing the relative strengths of the spot groups at the two active longitudes, with no actual spot movements across the stellar surface, i.e. exactly as it happens in other active stars.
  • We present new surface (Doppler) images of the late-type single giant FK Com for June-July 1996, July-August 1996, April 1997 and June 1997. These images are compared with the previously published images from 1994 and 1995. The consecutive maps are cross-correlated to see the possible migration of the spots and the effects of differential rotation. The cross-correlation confirms an average longitudinal spot migration of 0.22+/-0.03 in phase within a year. This movement is probably an artifact caused by a difference between the accepted rotation period and the real photometric period for these years. If this is true, then the photometric rotation period for these years is 2.4037+/-0.0005 days. Measurements from these four years and six maps limit the surface differential rotation to alpha=0.0001+/-0.0002, where alpha is the difference between polar and equatorial angular velocities relative to the equatorial angular velocity.