• We develop two algorithms, based on maximum likelihood (ML) inference, for estimating the parameters of polarized radio sources which emit at a single rotation measure (RM), e.g., pulsars. These algorithms incorporate the flux density spectrum of the source, either a power law or a scaled version of the Stokes I spectrum, and a variation in sensitivity across the observing band. We quantify the detection significance and measurement uncertainties in the fitted parameters, and we derive weighted versions of the RM synthesis algorithm which, under certain conditions, maximize the likelihood. We use Monte Carlo simulations to compare injected and recovered source parameters for a range of signal-to-noise ratios, investigate the quality of standard methods for estimating measurement uncertainties, and search for statistical biases. These simulations consider one frequency band each for the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), and the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR). We find that results obtained for one frequency band cannot be easily generalized, and that methods which were developed in the past for correcting bias in individual frequency channels do not apply to wide-band data sets. The standard method for estimating the measurement uncertainty in RM is not accurate for sources with non-zero spectral indices. Furthermore, dividing Stokes Q and U by Stokes I to correct for spectral index effects, in combination with RM synthesis, does not maximize the likelihood.
  • To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic centre (GC) we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A*. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ~ 16-33 microgauss; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (~ 12 degrees). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsars. If these pulsars lie behind the Radio Arc or G0.11-0.11 then this proves that low-scattering corridors with lengths >~ 100 pc must exist in the GC. This also suggests that future, sensitive observations will be able to detect additional pulsars in the GC. Finally, we show that the GC component in our most accurate electron density model oversimplifies structure in the GC.
  • Current-induced magnetization excitation is a core phenomenon for next-generation magnetic nanodevices, and has been attributed to the spin-transfer torque (STT) that originates from the transfer of the spin angular momentum between a conduction electron and a local magnetic moment through the exchange coupling. However, the same coupling can transfer not only spin but also energy, though the latter transfer mechanism has been largely ignored. Here we report on experimental evidence concerning the energy transfer in ferromagnet/heavy metal bilayers. The magnetoresistance (MR) is found to depend significantly on the current direction down to low in-plane currents, for which STT cannot play any significant role. Instead we find that the observed MR is consistent with the energy transfer mechanism through the quantum spin-flip process, which predicts short wavelength, current-direction-dependent magnon excitations in the THz frequency range. Our results unveil another aspect of current-induced magnetic excitation, and open a channel for the dc-current-induced generation of THz magnons.
  • We measure the proper motion of the pulsar PSR J1745-2900 relative to the Galactic Center massive black hole, Sgr A*, using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The pulsar has a transverse velocity of 236 +/- 11 km s^-1 at position angle 22 +/- 2 deg East of North at a projected separation of 0.097 pc from Sgr A*. Given the unknown radial velocity, this transverse velocity measurement does not conclusively prove that the pulsar is bound to Sgr A*; however, the probability of chance alignment is very small. We do show that the velocity and position is consistent with a bound orbit originating in the clockwise disk of massive stars orbiting Sgr A* and a natal velocity kick of <~ 500 km s^-1. An origin among the isotropic stellar cluster is possible but less probable. If the pulsar remains radio-bright, multi-year astrometry of PSR J1745-2900 can detect its acceleration and determine the full three-dimensional orbit. We also demonstrate that PSR J1745-2900 exhibits the same angular broadening as Sgr A* over a wavelength range of 3.6 cm to 0.7 cm, further confirming that the two sources share the same interstellar scattering properties. Finally, we place the first limits on the presence of a wavelength-dependent shift in the position of Sgr A*, i.e., the core shift, one of the expected properties of optically-thick jet emission. Our results for PSR J1745-2900 support the hypothesis that Galactic Center pulsars will originate from the stellar disk and deepens the mystery regarding the small number of detected Galactic Center pulsars.
  • We demonstrate that blending fluorinated molecules in PEDOT:PSS hole transport layers (HTL) induces charge transfers which impact on both charge extraction and photogeneration within organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. OPVs fabricated with modified HTL and two photoactive polymer blends led systematically to power conversion efficiencies (PCE) increases, with PTB7:PC70BM blend exhibiting PCE of ~ 8.3 %, i.e. ~ 15 % increase compared to pristine HTL devices. A reduced device-to-device characteristics variations was also noticed when fluorinated additives were used to modify the PEDOT:PSS. Shading lights onto the effect of HTL fluorination, we show that the morphology of the polymer:PCBM blends remains surprisingly unaffected by the fluorinated HTL surface energy but that, instead, the OPVs are impacted not only by the HTL electronic properties (work function, dipole layer, open circuit voltage, charge transfer dynamic) but also by alteration of the complex refractive indices (photogeneration, short circuit current density, external quantum efficiencies, electro-optic modelling). Both mechanisms find their origin in fluorination induced charge transfers. This work points towards fluorination as a promising strategy toward combining both external quantum efficiency modulation and power conversion efficiency enhancement in OPVs. Charge transfers could also be used more broadly to tune the optical constants and electric field distribution, as well as to reduce interfacial charge recombinations within OPVs.
  • The Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP) is an experiment that harvests the collective power of Europe's largest radio telescopes in order to increase the sensitivity of high-precision pulsar timing. As part of the ongoing effort of the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA), LEAP aims to go beyond the sensitivity threshold needed to deliver the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The five telescopes presently included in LEAP are: the Effelsberg telescope, the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank, the Nan\c cay radio telescope, the Sardinia Radio Telescope and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Dual polarization, Nyquist-sampled time-series of the incoming radio waves are recorded and processed offline to form the coherent sum, resulting in a tied-array telescope with an effective aperture equivalent to a 195-m diameter circular dish. All observations are performed using a bandwidth of 128 MHz centered at a frequency of 1396 MHz. In this paper, we present the design of the LEAP experiment, the instrumentation, the storage and transfer of data, and the processing hardware and software. In particular, we present the software pipeline that was designed to process the Nyquist-sampled time-series, measure the phase and time delays between each individual telescope and a reference telescope and apply these delays to form the tied-array coherent addition. The pipeline includes polarization calibration and interference mitigation. We also present the first results from LEAP and demonstrate the resulting increase in sensitivity, which leads to an improvement in the pulse arrival times.
  • We have searched for continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals produced by individually resolvable, circular supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) in the latest EPTA dataset, which consists of ultra-precise timing data on 41 millisecond pulsars. We develop frequentist and Bayesian detection algorithms to search both for monochromatic and frequency-evolving systems. None of the adopted algorithms show evidence for the presence of such a CGW signal, indicating that the data are best described by pulsar and radiometer noise only. Depending on the adopted detection algorithm, the 95\% upper limit on the sky-averaged strain amplitude lies in the range $6\times 10^{-15}<A<1.5\times10^{-14}$ at $5{\rm nHz}<f<7{\rm nHz}$. This limit varies by a factor of five, depending on the assumed source position, and the most constraining limit is achieved towards the positions of the most sensitive pulsars in the timing array. The most robust upper limit -- obtained via a full Bayesian analysis searching simultaneously over the signal and pulsar noise on the subset of ours six best pulsars -- is $A\approx10^{-14}$. These limits, the most stringent to date at $f<10{\rm nHz}$, exclude the presence of sub-centiparsec binaries with chirp mass $\cal{M}_c>10^9$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 25Mpc, and with $\cal{M}_c>10^{10}$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 1Gpc ($z\approx0.2$). We show that state-of-the-art SMBHB population models predict $<1\%$ probability of detecting a CGW with the current EPTA dataset, consistent with the reported non-detection. We stress, however, that PTA limits on individual CGW have improved by almost an order of magnitude in the last five years. The continuing advances in pulsar timing data acquisition and analysis techniques will allow for strong astrophysical constraints on the population of nearby SMBHBs in the coming years.
  • We investigate how the imprint of Faraday rotation on radio spectra can be used to determine the geometry of radio sources and the strength and structure of the surrounding magnetic fields. We model spectra of Stokes Q and U for frequencies between 200 MHz and 10 GHz for Faraday screens with large-scale or small-scale magnetic fields external to the source. These sources can be uniform or 2D Gaussians on the sky with transverse linear gradients in rotation measure (RM), or cylinders or spheroids with an azimuthal magnetic field. At high frequencies the spectra of all these models can be approximated by the spectrum of a Gaussian source; this is independent of whether the magnetic field is large-scale or small-scale. A sinc spectrum in polarized flux density is not a unique signature of a volume where synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation are mixed. A turbulent Faraday screen with a large field coherence length produces a spectrum which is similar to the spectrum of a partial coverage model. At low and intermediate frequencies, such a Faraday screen produces a significantly higher polarized signal than the depolarization model by Burn, as shown by a random walk model of the polarization vectors. We calculate RM spectra for four frequency windows. Sources are strongly depolarized at low frequencies, but RMs can be determined accurately if the sensitivity of the observations is sufficient. Finally, we show that RM spectra can be used to differentiate between turbulent foreground models and partial coverage models.
  • On a time scale of years to decades, gravitational wave (GW) astronomy will become a reality. Low frequency (nanoHz) GWs are detectable through long-term timing observations of the most stable pulsars. Radio observatories worldwide are currently carrying out observing programmes to detect GWs, with data sets being shared through the International Pulsar Timing Array project. One of the most likely sources of low frequency GWs are supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs), detectable as a background due to a large number of binaries, or as continuous or burst emission from individual sources. No GW signal has yet been detected, but stringent constraints are already being placed on galaxy evolution models. The SKA will bring this research to fruition. In this chapter, we describe how timing observations using SKA1 will contribute to detecting GWs, or can confirm a detection if a first signal already has been identified when SKA1 commences observations. We describe how SKA observations will identify the source(s) of a GW signal, search for anisotropies in the background, improve models of galaxy evolution, test theories of gravity, and characterise the early inspiral phase of a SMBHB system. We describe the impact of the large number of millisecond pulsars to be discovered by the SKA; and the observing cadence, observation durations, and instrumentation required to reach the necessary sensitivity. We describe the noise processes that will influence the achievable precision with the SKA. We assume a long-term timing programme using the SKA1-MID array and consider the implications of modifications to the current design. We describe the possible benefits from observations using SKA1-LOW. Finally, we describe GW detection prospects with SKA1 and SKA2, and end with a description of the expectations of GW astronomy.
  • Many models for the pulsar radio and $\gamma$-ray emissions have been developed. The tests for these models using observational data are very important. Tests for the pulsar radio emission models using frequency-altitude relation are presented in this paper. In the radio band, the mean pulse profiles evolve with observing frequencies. There are various styles of pulsar profile - frequency evolutions (which we call as "beam evolution" figure), e.g. some pulsars show that mean pulse profiles are wider and core emission is higher at higher frequencies than that at lower frequencies, but some other pulsars show completely the contrary results. We show that all these "beam evolution" figures can be understood by the Inverse Compton Scattering(ICS) model (see Qiao at al.2001 also). An important observing test is that, for a certain observing frequency different emission components are radiated from the different heights. For the $\gamma$-ray pulsars, the geometrical method (Wang et al. 2006) can be used to diagnose the radiation location for the $\gamma$-ray radiation. As an example, Wang et al. (2006) constrain the $\gamma$-ray radiation location of PSR B1055-52 to be the place near the null charge surface. Here we show that Wang's result matches the proposed radiation locations by the annular gap model as well as the outer gap models.
  • The direct detection of gravitational waves is a major goal of current astrophysics. We provide details of a new method for detecting a stochastic background of gravitational waves using pulsar timing data. Our results show that regular timing observations of 40 pulsars each with a timing accuracy of 100 nano-seconds will be able to make a direct detection of the predicted stochastic background from coalescing black holes within five years. With an improved pre-whitening algorithm, or if the background is at the upper end of the predicted range, a significant detection should be possible with only 20 pulsars.
  • In contrast to earlier studies performed on simple Co/Cu/Co sandwiches, we have investigated spin transfer effects in complex spin-valve pillars with a diameter of 130nm developed for current-perpendicular to the plane (CPP) magneto-resistive heads. The structure of the samples included an exchange biased synthetic pinned layer and a free layer both laminated by insertion of several ultrathin Cu layers. Despite the small thickness of the polarizing layer, our results show that the free layer can be switched between the parallel (P) and the antiparallel (AP) states by applying current densities of the order of 10^7 A/cm^2. A strong asymmetry is observed between the two critical currents IcAP-P and IcP-AP, as predicted by the model of Slonczewski model. Thanks to the use of exchange biased structures, the stability phase diagrams could be obtained in the four quadrants of the (H, I) plan. The critical lines derived from the magnetoresistance curves measured with different sense currents, and from the resistance versus current curves measured for different applied fields, match each other very well. The main features of the phase diagrams can be reproduced by investigating the stability of the solutions of the Landau Lifshitz Gilbert equation including spin torque term within a macrospin model. A spin-transfer saturation effect was observed in the positive currents range. We attribute it to a de-depolarization effect which appears as a consequence of the asymmetric heating of the pillars, whose top and the bottom leads are made of different materials.
  • Although pulsars can radiate electromagnetic wave from radio to gamma ray bands, we still have no a united model to understand the multi-band emission. In this paper the effort for a joint model is presented. The inverse Compton scattering (ICS) and a second acceleration process near the null charge surface are involved to account for the radio and the gama-ray emission, respectively. Various kind of pulse profiles and other observational properties can be reproduced.
  • The radiation of pulsars have been observed for many years. A few pulsars are discovered to have both radio and gamma-ray emission. Many models on pulsar radiation have been developed, but so far we are still lacking an elaborate model which can explain the emission from radio to gamma-rays in detail. In this paper we present a joint model for radio and gamma-ray emission, in which both the dominate emission mechanisms are inverse Compton scattering. The pulse profiles at radio and gamma-ray bands are reproduced for the Crab-like, Vela-like and Geminga-like pulsars, in good agreement with observations.