• We report on new X-ray observations of the classical T Tauri star DG Tau. DG Tau drives a collimated bi-polar jet known to be a source of X-ray emission perhaps driven by internal shocks. The rather modest extinction permits study of the jet system to distances very close to the star itself. Our initial results presented here show that the spatially resolved X-ray jet has been moving and fading during the past six years. In contrast, a stationary, very soft source much closer (~ 0.15-0.2") to the star but apparently also related to the jet has brightened during the same period. We report accurate temperatures and absorption column densities toward this source, which is probably associated with the jet base or the jet collimation region.
  • (Abridged) We have conducted a study of [NeII] line emission based on a sample of 92 pre-main sequence stars mostly belonging to the infrared Class II, including 13 accreting transition disk objects and 14 objects driving jets and outflows. We find several significant correlations between L[NeII] and stellar parameters, in particular LX and the wind mass loss rate, dM/dt. Most correlations are, however, strongly dominated by systematic scatter. While there is a positive correlation between L[NeII] and LX, the stellar mass accretion rate, dMacc/dt, induces a correlation only if we combine the largely different subsets of jet sources and stars without jets. Our results suggest that L[NeII] is bi-modally distributed, with separate distributions for the two subsamples. The jet sources show systematically higher L[NeII], by 1-2 orders of magnitude with respect to objects without jets. Jet-driving stars also tend to show higher mass accretion rates. We therefore hypothesize that the trend with dMacc/dt reflects a trend with dM/dt that is more physically relevant for [NeII] emission. L[NeII] measured for objects without known outflows and jets is found to agree with simplified calculations of [NeII] emission from disk surface layers if the measured stellar X-rays are responsible for heating and ionizing of the gas. The large scatter in L[NeII] may be introduced by variations of disk properties and the irradiation spectrum, as previously suggested. The systematically enhanced [NeII] flux from jet sources clearly suggests a role for the jets themselves, as previously demonstrated by a spatially resolved observation of the outflow system in the T Tau triple.
  • Abriged version for astroph: The young late-type star V1118 Orionis was in outburst from 2005 to 2006. We followed the outburst with optical and near-infrared photometry; the X-ray emission was further probed with observations taken with XMM-Newton and Chandra during and after the outburst. In addition, we obtained mid-infrared photometry and spectroscopy with Spitzer at the peak of the outburst and in the post-outburst phase. The spectral energy distribution of V1118 Ori varied significantly over the course of the outburst. The optical flux showed the largest variations, most likely due to enhanced emission by a hot spot. The latter dominated the optical and near-infrared emission at the peak of the outburst, while the disk emission dominated in the mid-infrared. The X-ray flux correlated with the optical and infrared fluxes, indicating that accretion affected the magnetically active corona and the stellar magnetosphere. The thermal structure of the corona was variable with some indication of a cooling of the coronal temperature in the early phase of the outburst with a gradual return to normal values. Color-color diagrams in the optical and infrared showed variations during the outburst, with no obvious signature of reddening due to circumstellar matter. Using MC realizations of star+disk+hotspot models to fit the SED in ``quiescence'' and at the peak of the outburst, we determined that the mass accretion rate varied from about 2.5E-7 Msun/yr to 1E-6 Msun/yr; in addition the fractional area of the hotspot increased significantly as well. The multi-wavelength study of the V1118 Ori outburst helped us to understand the variations in spectral energy distributions and demonstrated the interplay between the disk and the stellar magnetosphere in a young, strongly accreting star.
  • The variable star V1735 Cyg (= Elias 1-12) lies in the IC 5146 dark cloud and is a member of the class of FU Orionis objects whose dramatic optical brightenings are thought to be linked to episodic accretion. We report the first X-ray detections of V1735 Cyg and a deeply-embedded class I protostar lying 24 arcsecs to its northeast. X-ray spectra obtained with EPIC on XMM-Newton reveal very high-temperature plasma (kT > 5 keV) in both objects, but no large flares. Such hard X-ray emission is not anticipated from accretion shocks and is a signature of magnetic processes. We place these new results into the context of what is presently known about the X-ray properties of FU Orionis stars and other accreting young stellar objects.
  • FU Orionis stars (FUors) are young low-mass eruptive stars that are thought to be accreting at high rates. They could give rise to soft X-ray emission from accretion shocks, but their X-ray properties are largely unknown. We report the first X-ray detection of the prototype star FU Orionis with XMM-Newton. Its X-ray spectrum is unusual compared to those of classical T Tauri stars (cTTS). The cool and hot components typically detected in cTTS are present but are seen through different absorption column densities. A heavily-absorbed hot component at kT > 5 keV accounts for most of the observed flux and a strong Fe K emission line is present. Such high temperatures are characteristic of magnetic processes rather than shock emission. We discuss possible origins of the unusual spectrum in the context of a complex physical environment that likely includes disk accretion, a strong wind, magnetic activity, and close binarity.
  • We present evidence for an X-ray jet in the T Tau star DG Tau A based on Chandra ACIS data. DG Tau A, a jet-driving classical T Tau star with a flat infrared spectrum, reveals an unusual X-ray spectrum that requires two thermal components with different intervening absorption column densities. The softer component shows a low temperature of T \approx 2.9 MK, and its absorption is compatible with the stellar optical extinction (hydrogen column density N_H \approx 5x10^21 cm^-2). In contrast, the harder component reveals a temperature (22 MK) characteristic for active T Tau stars but its emission is more strongly absorbed (N_H \approx 2.8x10^22 cm^-2). Furthermore, the high-resolution ACIS-S image reveals a weak excess of soft (0.5-2 keV) counts at distances of 2-4" from the star precisely along the optical jet, with a suggestive concentration at 4" where a bow-shock-like structure has previously been identified in optical line observations. The energy distribution of these photons is similar to those of the stellar soft component. We interpret the soft spectral component as originating from shocks at the base of the jet, with shock heating continuing out to a distance of at least 500 AU along the jet, whereas the hard component is most likely coronal/magnetospheric as in other young stellar systems.