• Probing magnetic field directions in the interstellar medium is generally difficult even with the use of the polarimetry. The recent development of the Velocity Gradient Technique (VGT) allows observers to probe magnetic field directions with spectroscopic data. However, the quality of the spectroscopic maps highly influences the prediction of magnetic field directions using VGT. In this paper, we employ the method of Principle Component Analysis (PCA) to extract the turbulent part of the spectroscopic cubes for VGT to apply. By using synthetic observation data from numerical simulations, we show that PCA is similar to a method of wavenumber filtering along the velocity axis. With the filtering, the performance of PCA-VGT is significantly improved in tracing magnetic field directions, especially in the presence of noise both in the subsonic and supersonic region. We select a GALFA-HI region nearly Galactic zenith for testing.
  • Recent developments of the Velocity Gradient Technique (VGT) show that the velocity gradients provide a reliable tracing of magnetic field direction in turbulent plasmas. In this paper, we explore the ability of velocity gradients to measure the magnetization of interstellar medium. We demonstrate that the distribution of velocity gradient orientations provides a reliable estimation of the magnetization of the media. In particular, we determine the relation between Alfvenic Mach number $M_A$ and properties of the velocity gradient distribution, namely, with the dispersion of velocity gradient orientation as well as with the peak to base ratio of the amplitudes. We apply our technique for a selected GALFA-HI region and find the results consistent with the expected behavior of $M_A$. Using 3D MHD simulations we successfully compare the results with our new measure of magnetization that is based on the dispersion of starlight polarization. We demonstrate that, combined with the velocity dispersion along the line of sight direction, our technique is capable to deliver the magnetic field strength. The new technique opens a way to measure magnetization using other gradient measures such as synchrotron intensity gradients (SIGs) and synchrotron polarization gradients (SPGs).
  • Magnetohydrodynamic(MHD) turbulence displays anisotropic velocity and density features which reflect the direction of the magnetic field. This anisotropy has led to the development of a number of statistical techniques for studying magnetic fields in the interstellar medium. In this paper, we review and compare three techniques for determining magnetic field strength and morphology that use radio position-position-velocity data: the correlation function anisotropy (CFA), Principal Component Analysis of Anisotropies (PCAA), and the more recent Velocity Gradient Technique (VGT). We compare these three techniques and suggest improvements to the CFA and PCAA techniques to increase their accuracy and versatility. In particular, we suggest and successfully implement a much faster way of calculating non-periodic correlation functions for the CFA. We discuss possible improvements to the current implementation of the PCAA. We show the advantages of the VGT in terms of magnetic field tracing and stress the complementary nature with the other two techniques.
  • On the basis of the modern understanding of MHD turbulence, we propose a new way of using synchrotron radiation, namely using synchrotron intensity gradients for tracing astrophysical magnetic fields. We successfully test the new technique using synthetic data obtained with the 3D MHD simulations and provide the demonstration of the practical utility of the technique by comparing the directions of magnetic field that are obtained with PLANCK synchrotron intensity dats to the directions obtained with PLANCK synchrotron polarization data. We demonstrate that the synchrotron intensity gradients (SIGs) can reliably trace magnetic field in the presence of noise and can provide detailed maps of magnetic-field directions. We also show that the SIGs are relatively robust for tracing magnetic fields while the low spacial frequencies of the synchrotron image are removed. This makes the SIGs applicable to tracing of magnetic fields using interferometric data with single dish measurement absent. We discuss the synergy of using the SIGs together with synchrotron polarization in order to find the actual direction of the magnetic field and quantify the effects of Faraday rotation as well as with other ways of studying astrophysical magnetic fields. We test our method in the presence of noise and the resolution effects. We stress the complementary nature of the studies using the SIG technique and those employing the recently-introduced velocity gradient techniques that traces the magnetic fields using spectroscopic data.
  • Based on the properties of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, the recent development of the Velocity Gradient Technique (VGT) allows observers to trace magnetic field directions using spectroscopic information. In this paper, we explore how the amplitudes of gradients from different observables are correlated to the properties of turbulence in terms of statistical moments. We find there is a very good power-law relationship between the dispersion of gradient amplitudes and sonic Mach Number $M_s$, and the increase of alignments of the gradient amplitudes filaments to the decrease of Alfvenic Mach number $M_A$. The visual and quantitative relation between the shapes of gradient amplitudes to Mach numbers allows us to easily evaluate physical conditions. We illustrate our method in GALFA-HI data and find that the high latitude regions have higher $M_s$ but lower $M_A$, which requires theoretical explanations.
  • In this paper, we describe a new technique for probing galactic and extragalactic 2D and 3D distribution of magnetic field using synchrotron polarization. Fluctuations of magnetic field are elongated along the ambient magnetic field directions. As a result, the variations of magnetic field are maximal in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field directions. This provides the physical basis for tracing the line-of-sight (LOS) averaged magnetic field directions using synchrotron polarization gradients (SPGs). The 3D mapping of the magnetic field is possible as polarized synchrotron radiation is depolarized due to the Faraday rotation effect, which ensures that the polarized radiation arises only from regions close to the observer. The depth for probing the emission region with synchrotron polarization is frequency dependent, with longer wavelength probing only in the nearby regions. While the polarization directions is not able to trace the magnetic field directions correctly in the presence of strong Faraday rotation effect, we show that the polarization gradients are capable of tracing magnetic field successfully under such conditions. This constitutes the basis of tomographic magnetic field studies using the SPGs technique. We also analyze the magnetic field properties along the line-of-sight, we employ the gradient technique to the wavelength derivative of synchrotron polarization termed synchrotron derivative polarization gradients (SDPGs), and propose a way of recovering the 3D vectors of the underlying magnetic fields. The new techniques are different from the traditional Faraday tomography in that they provide a way to map the distribution of magnetic fields in the real space rather than the space of Faraday rotation depths.
  • We identify velocity channel map intensities as a new way to trace magnetic fields in turbulent media. This work makes use of both of the modern theory of MHD turbulence predicting that the magnetic eddies are aligned with the local direction of magnetic field, and also the theory of the spectral line Position-Position-Velocity (PPV) statistics describing how the velocity and density fluctuations are mapped into the PPV space. In particular, we use the fact that, the fluctuations of intensity of thin channel maps are mostly affected by the turbulent velocity, while the thick maps are dominated by density variations. We study how contributions of the fundamental MHD modes affect the Velocity Channel Gradients (VChGs) and demonstrate that the VChGs arising from Alfven and slow modes are aligned perpendicular to the local direction of magnetic field, while the VChGs produced by the fast mode are aligned parallel to the magnetic field. The dominance of the Alfven and slow modes in the interstellar media will therefore allow a reliable magnetic field tracing using the VChGs. We explore ways of identifying self-gravitating regions that do not require polarimetric information. In addition, we also introduce a new measure termed "Reduced Velocity Centroids" (RVCGs) and compare its abilities with the VChGs. We employed both measures to the GALFA 21cm data and successfully compared thus magnetic field directions with the {\it PLANCK} polarization. The applications of the suggested techniques include both tracing magnetic field in diffuse interstellar media and star forming regions, as well as removing the galactic foreground in the framework of cosmological polarization studies.
  • This study proceeds with the development of the technique employing velocity gradients that were identified in (\cite{GL17}, henceforth GL17) as a means of probing magnetic field in interstellar media. We demonstrate a number of practical ways on improving the accuracy of tracing magnetic fields in diffuse interstellar media using velocity centroid gradients (VCGs). Addressing the magnetic field tracing in super-Alfvenic turbulence we introduce the procedure of filtering low spatial frequencies, that enables magnetic field tracing in the situations when the kinetic energy of turbulent plasmas dominate its magnetic energy. We propose the synergic way of of using VCGs together with intensity gradients (IGs), synchrotron intensity gradients (SIGs) as well as dust polarimetry. We show that while the IGs trace magnetic field worse than the VCGs, the deviations of the angle between the IGs and VCGs trace the shocks in diffuse media. Similarly the perpendicular orientation of the VCGs and the SIGs or to the dust polarimetry data trace the regions of gravitational collapse. We demonstrate the utility of combining the VCGs, IGs and polarimetry using GALFA HI and Planck polarimetry data. We also provide an example of synergy of the VCGs and the SIGs using the HI4PI full-sky HI survey together with the Planck synchrotron intensity data.
  • The advancement of our understanding of MHD turbulence opens ways to develop new techniques to probe magnetic fields. In MHD turbulence, the velocity gradients are expected to be perpendicular to magnetic fields and this fact was used by Gonsalvez-Casanova & Lazarian to introduce a new technique to trace magnetic fields using velocity centroid gradients. The latter can be obtained from spectroscopic observations. We apply the technique to GALFA HI survey data and compare the directions of magnetic fields obtained with our technique with the direction of magnetic fields obtained using PLANCK polarization. We find excellent correspondence between the two ways of magnetic field tracing, which is obvious via visual comparison and through measuring of the statistics of magnetic field fluctuations obtained with the polarization data and our technique. This suggests that the velocity centroid gradients can provide a reliable way of measuring of the foreground magnetic field fluctuations and thus provide a new way of separating foreground and CMB polarization signals.
  • Most molecular clouds are filamentary or elongated. Among those forming low-mass stars, their long axes tend to be either parallel or perpendicular to the large-scale (10-100 pc) magnetic field (B-field) in the surrounding inter cloud medium. This arises because, along the dynamically dominant B-fields, the competition between self-gravity and turbulent pressure will shape the cloud to be elongated either perpendicular or parallel to the fields. Recent study also suggested that, on the scales of 0.1-0.01 pc, fields are dynamically important within cloud cores forming massive stars. But whether the core field morphologies are inherited from the inter cloud medium or governed by cloud turbulence is under vigorous debate, so is the role played by B-fields in cloud fragmentation at 10 - 0.1 pc scales. Here we report B-field maps covering 100-0.01 pc scales inferred from polarimetric observations of a massive-star forming region, NGC 6334. First, the main filament also lies perpendicular to the ambient field. NGC 6334 hosts young star-forming sites where fields are not severely affected by stellar feedback, and their directions do not change significantly over the entire scale range. This means that the fields are dynamically important. At various scales, we find that the hourglass-shaped field lines are pinched where the gas column density peaks and the field strength is proportional to the 0.4-power of the density. We conclude that B-fields play a crucial role in the fragmentation of NGC 6334.