• Black phosphorus (BP) has emerged as a promising material candidate for next generation electronic and optoelectronic devices due to its high mobility, tunable band gap and highly anisotropic properties. In this work, polarization resolved ultrafast mid-infrared transient reflection spectroscopy measurements are performed to study the dynamical anisotropic optical properties of BP under magnetic fields up to 9 T. The relaxation dynamics of photoexcited carrier is found to be insensitive to the applied magnetic field due to the broadening of the Landau levels and large effective mass of carriers. While the anisotropic optical response of BP decreases with increasing magnetic field, its enhancement due to the excitation of hot carriers is similar to that without magnetic field. These experimental results can be well interpreted by the magneto-optical conductivity of the Landau levels of BP thin film, based on an effective k*p Hamiltonian and linear response theory. These findings suggest attractive possibilities of multi-dimensional controls of anisotropic response (AR) of BP with light, electric and magnetic field, which further introduces BP to the fantastic magnetic field sensitive applications.
  • The carrier-mediated RKKY interaction between local spins plays an important role for the application of magnetically doped graphene in spintronics and quantum computation. Previous studies largely concentrate on the influence of electronic states of uniform systems on the RKKY interaction. Here we reveal a very different way to manipulate the RKKY interaction by showing that the anomalous focusing - a well-known electron optics phenomenon in graphene P-N junctions - can be utilized to refocus the massless Dirac electrons emanating from one local spin to the other local spin. This gives rise to rich spatial interference patterns and symmetry-protected non-oscillatory RKKY interaction with a strongly enhanced magnitude. It may provide a new way to engineer the long-range spin-spin interaction in graphene.
  • We report on a class of quantum spin Hall insulators (QSHIs) in strained-layer InAs/GaInSb quantum wells, in which the bulk gaps are enhanced by up to five folds as compared to the binary InAs/GaSb QSHI. Remarkably, with consequently increasing edge velocity, the edge conductance at zero and applied magnetic fields manifests time reversal symmetry (TRS) -protected properties consistent with Z2 topological insulator. The InAs/GaInSb bilayers offer a much sought-after platform for future studies and applications of the QSHI.
  • We theoretically propose that, the single crystal formed TaS is a new type of topological semimetal, hosting ring-shaped gapless nodal lines and triply degenerate points (TDPs) in the absence of spin-orbit coupling (SOC). In the presence of SOC, the each TDP splits into four TDPs along the high symmetric line in the momentum space, and one of the nodal ring remains closed due to the protection of the mirror reflection symmetry, while another nodal ring is fully gapped and transforms into six pairs ofWeyl points (WPs) carrying opposite chirality. The electronic structures of the projected surfaces are also discussed, the unique Fermi arcs are observed and the chirality remains or vanishes depending on the projection directions. On the (010) projected surface, one may observe a Lifshitz transition. The new type of topological semimetal TaS is stable and experimentally achievable, and the coexistence of topological nodal lines, WPs and TDPs states in TaS makes it a potential candidate to study the interplay between different types of topological fermions.
  • This work presents theoretical demonstration of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in monolayer phosphorene nanorings (PNR). Atomistic quantum transport simulations of PNR are employed to investigate the impact of multiple modulation sources on the sample conductance. In presence of a perpendicular magnetic field, we find that the conductance of both armchair and zigzag PNR oscillate periodically in a low-energy window as a manifestation of the AB effect. Our numerical results have revealed a giant magnetoresistance (MR) in zigzag PNR (with a maximum magnitude approaching two thousand percent). It is attributed to the AB effect induced destructive interference phase in a wide energy range below the bottom of the second subband. We also demonstrate that PNR conductance is highly anisotropic, offering an additional way to modulate MR. The giant MR in PNR is maintained at room temperature in the presence of thermal broadening effect.
  • Time-reversal ($\mathcal{T}$-) symmetry is fundamental to many physical processes. Typically, $\mathcal{T}$-breaking for microscopic processes requires the presence of magnetic field. However, for 2D massless Dirac billiards, $\mathcal{T}$-symmetry is broken automatically by the mass confinement, leading to chiral quantum scars. In this paper, we investigate the mechanism of $\mathcal{T}$-breaking by analyzing the local current of the scarring eigenstates and their magnetic response to an Aharonov--Bohm flux. Our results unveil the complete understanding of the subtle $\mathcal{T}$-breaking phenomena from both the semiclassical formula of chiral scars and the microscopic current and spin reflection at the boundaries, leading to a controlling scheme to change the chirality of the relativistic quantum scars. Our findings not only have significant implications on the transport behavior and spin textures of the relativistic pseudoparticles, but also add basic knowledge to relativistic quantum chaos.
  • The integration of different two-dimensional materials within a multilayer van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure offers a promising technology for realizing high performance opto-electronic devices such as photodetectors and light sources1-3. Transition metal dichalcogenides, e.g. MoS2 and WSe2, have been employed as the optically-active layer in recently developed heterojunctions. However, MoS2 and WSe2 become direct band gap semiconductors only in mono- or bilayer form4,5. In contrast, the metal monochalcogenides InSe and GaSe retain a direct bandgap over a wide range of layer thicknesses from bulk crystals down to exfoliated flakes only a few atomic monolayers thick6,7. Here we report on vdW heterojunction diodes based on InSe and GaSe: the type II band alignment between the two materials and their distinctive spectral response, combined with the low electrical resistance of transparent graphene electrodes, enable effective separation and extraction of photoexcited carriers from the heterostructure even when no external voltage is applied. Our devices are fast (< 10 {\mu}s), self-driven photodetectors with multicolor photoresponse ranging from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared and have the potential to accelerate the exploitation of two-dimensional vdW crystals by creating new routes to miniaturized optoelectronics beyond present technologies.
  • The single-particle Green's function (GF) of mesoscopic structures plays a central role in mesoscopic quantum transport. The recursive GF technique is a standard tool to compute this quantity numerically, but it lacks physical transparency and is limited to relatively small systems. Here we present a numerically efficient and physically transparent GF formalism for a general layered structure. In contrast to the recursive GF that directly calculates the GF through the Dyson equations, our approach converts the calculation of the GF to the generation and subsequent propagation of a scattering wave function emanating from a local excitation. This viewpoint not only allows us to reproduce existing results in a concise and physically intuitive manner, but also provides analytical expressions of the GF in terms of a generalized scattering matrix. This identifies the contributions from each individual scattering channel to the GF and hence allows this information to be extracted quantitatively from dual-probe STM experiments. The simplicity and physical transparency of the formalism further allows us to treat the multiple reflection analytically and derive an analytical rule to construct the GF of a general layered system. This could significantly reduce the computational time and enable quantum transport calculations for large samples. We apply this formalism to perform both analytical analysis and numerical simulation for the two-dimensional conductance map of a realistic graphene p-n junction. The results demonstrate the possibility of observing the spatially-resolved interference pattern caused by negative refraction and further reveal a few interesting features, such as the distance-independent conductance and its quadratic dependence on the carrier concentration, as opposed to the linear dependence in uniform graphene.
  • We investigated the electronic and optoelectronic properties of vertical van der Waals heterostructure photodetectors using layered p type GaSe and n type InSe, with graphene as the transparent electrodes. Not only the photocurrent peaks from the layered GaSe and InSe themselves were observed, also the interlayer optical transition peak was observed, which is consistent with the first-principles calculation. The built-in electric field between p-n heterojunction and the advantage of the graphene electrodes can effectively separate the photo-induced electron-hole pairs, and thus lead to the response time down to 160 {\mu}s. Making use of the interlayer as well as intralayer optical transitions of the vertical layered p-n heterostructure and graphene electrodes, we could achieve high performance multi-color photodetectors based on two-dimensional layered materials, which will be important for future optoelectronics.
  • We demonstrate theoretically the coexistence of Dirac semimetal and topological insulator phases in InSb/$\alpha$-Sn conventional semiconductor superlattices, based on advanced first-principles calculations combined with low-energy $k\cdot p$ theory. By proper interfaces designing, a large interface polarization emerges when the growth direction is chosen along {[}111{]}. Such an intrinsic polarized electrostatic field reduces band gap largely and invert the band structure finally, leading to emerge of the topological Dirac semimetal phase with a pair of Dirac nodes appearing along the (111) crystallographic direction near the $\Gamma$ point. The surface states and Fermi arc are clearly observed in (100) projected surface. In addition, we also find a two-dimensional topological insulator phase with large nontrivial band gap approaching 70 meV, which make it possible to observe the quantum spin Hall effect at room temperature. Our proposal paves a way to realize topological nontrivial phases coexisted in conventional semiconductor superlattices by proper interface designing.
  • We predict a novel quantum interference based on the negative refraction across a semiconductor P-N junction: with a local pump on one side of the junction, the response of a local probe on the other side behaves as if the disturbance emanates not from the pump but instead from its mirror image about the junction. This phenomenon is guaranteed by translational invariance of the system and matching of Fermi surfaces of the constituent materials, thus it is robust against other details of the junction (e.g., junction width, potential profile, and even disorder). The recently fabricated P-N junctions in 2D semiconductors provide ideal platforms to explore this phenomenon and its applications to dramatically enhance charge and spin transport as well as carrier-mediated long-range correlation.
  • We propose an experimentally feasible scheme for generating entangled terahertz photon pairs in topological insulator quantum dots (TIQDs). We demonstrate theoretically that in generic TIQDs: 1) the fine structure splitting, which is the obstacle to produce entangled photons in conventional semiconductor quantum dots, is inherently absent for one-dimensional massless excitons due to the time-reversal symmetry; 2) the selection rules obey winding number conservation instead of the conventional angular momentum conservation between edge states with a linear dispersion. With these two advantages, the entanglement of the emitted photons during the cascade in our scheme is robust against unavoidable disorders and irregular shapes of the TIQDs.
  • We present a general theory about electron orbital motions in topological insulators. An in-plane electric field drives spin-up and spin-down electrons bending to opposite directions, and skipping orbital motions, a counterpart of the integer quantum Hall effect, are formed near the boundary of the sample. The accompanying Zitterbewegung can be found and controlled by tuning external electric fields. Ultrafast flipping electron spin leads to a quantum side jump in the topological insulator, and a snake-orbit motion in two-dimensional electron gas with spin-orbit interactions. This feature provides a way to control electron orbital motion by manipulating electron spin.
  • We present a comparative theoretical study of the effects of standard Anderson and magnetic disorders on the topological phases of two-dimensional Rashba spin-orbit coupled superconductors, with the initial state to be either topologically trivial or nontrivial. Using the self-consistent Born approximation approach, we show that the presence of Anderson disorders will drive a topological superconductor into a topologically trivial superconductor in the weak coupling limit. Even more strikingly, a topologically trivial superconductor can be driven into a topological superconductor upon diluted doping of independent magnetic disorders, which gradually narrow, close, and reopen the quasi-particle gap in a nontrivial manner. These topological phase transitions are distinctly characterized by the changes in the corresponding topological invariants. The central findings made here are also confirmed using a complementary numerical approach by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations self-consistently within a tight-binding model. The present study offers appealing new schemes for potential experimental realization of topological superconductors.
  • It was proposed that a dilute semimetal is unstable against the formation of an exciton insulator, however experimental confirmations have remained elusive. We investigate the origin of bulk energy gap in inverted InAs/GaSb quantum wells (QWs) which naturally host spatially-separated electrons and holes, using charge-neutral point density (no~po) in gated-device as a tuning parameter. We find two distinct regimes of gap formation, that for I), no >> 5x1010/cm2, a soft gap opens predominately by electron-hole hybridization; and for II), approaching the dilute limit no~ 5x1010/cm2, a hard gap opens leading to a true bulk insulator with quantized edge states. Moreover, the gap is dramatically reduced as the QWs are tuned to less dilute. We further examine the response of gaps to in-plane magnetic fields, and find that for I) the gap closes at B// > ~ 10T, consistent with hybridization while for II) the gap opens continuously for B// as high as 35T. Our analyses show that the hard gap in II) cannot be explained by single-particle hybridization. The data are remarkably consistent with the formation of a nontrivial exciton insulator in very dilute InAs/GaSb QWs.
  • We theoretically investigate the electronic and magneto-optical properties of rectangular, hexangular, and triangular monolayer phosphorene quantum dots (MPQDs) utilizing the tight-binding method. The electronic states, density of states, electronic density distribution, and Laudau levels as well as the optical absorption spectrum are calculated numerically. Our calculations show that: (1) edge states appear in the band gap in all kinds of MPQDs regardless of their shapes and edge configurations due to the anisotropic electron hopping in monolayer phosphorene (MLP). Electrons in any edge state appear only in the armchair direction of the dot boundary, which is distinct from that in graphene quantum dots; (2) the magnetic levels of MPQDs exhibit a Hofstadter-butterfly spectrum and approach the Landau levels of MLP as the magnetic field increases . A "flat band" appears in the magneto-energy spectrum which is totally different from that of MLP; (3) the electronic and optical properties can be tuned by the dot size, the types of boundary edges and the external magnetic field.
  • Development of new, high quality functional materials has been at the forefront of condensed matter research. The recent advent of two-dimensional black phosphorus has greatly enriched the material base of two-dimensional electron systems. Significant progress has been made to achieve high mobility black phosphorus two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) since the development of the first black phosphorus field-effect transistors (FETs)$^{1-4}$. Here, we reach a milestone in developing high quality black phosphorus 2DEG - the observation of integer quantum Hall (QH) effect. We achieve high quality by embedding the black phosphorus 2DEG in a van der Waals heterostructure close to a graphite back gate; the graphite gate screens the impurity potential in the 2DEG, and brings the carrier Hall mobility up to 6000 $cm^{2}V^{-1}s^{-1}$. The exceptional mobility enabled us, for the first time, to observe QH effect, and to gain important information on the energetics of the spin-split Landau levels in black phosphorus. Our results set the stage for further study on quantum transport and device application in the ultrahigh mobility regime.
  • Based on the Born-Oppemheimer approximation, we divide total electron Hamiltonian in a spinorbit coupled system into slow orbital motion and fast interband transition process. We find that the fast motion induces a gauge field on slow orbital motion, perpendicular to electron momentum, inducing a topological phase. From this general designing principle, we present a theory for generating artificial gauge field and topological phase in a conventional two-dimensional electron gas embedded in parabolically graded GaAs/In$_{x}$Ga$_{1-x}$As/GaAs quantum wells with antidot lattices. By tuning the etching depth and period of antidot lattices, the band folding caused by superimposed potential leads to formation of minibands and band inversions between the neighboring subbands. The intersubband spin-orbit interaction opens considerably large nontrivial minigaps and leads to many pairs of helical edge states in these gaps.
  • We investigate theoretically the Landau levels (LLs) and magneto-transport properties of phosphorene under a perpendicular magnetic field within the framework of the effective \textbf{\emph{k$\cdot$p}} Hamiltonian and tight-binding (TB) model. At low field regime, we find that the LLs linearly depend both on the LL index $n$ and magnetic field $B$, which is similar with that of conventional semiconductor two-dimensional electron gas. The Landau splittings of conduction and valence band are different and the wavefunctions corresponding to the LLs are strongly anisotropic due to the different anisotropic effective masses. An analytical expression for the LLs in low energy regime is obtained via solving the decoupled Hamiltonian, which agrees well with the numerical calculations. At high magnetic regime, a self-similar Hofstadter butterfly (HB) spectrum is obtained by using the TB model. The HB spectrum is consistent with the Landau level fan calculated from the effective \textbf{\emph{k$\cdot$p}} theory in a wide regime of magnetic fields. We find the LLs of phosphorene nanoribbon depend strongly on the ribbon orientation due to the anisotropic hopping parameters. The Hall and the longitudinal conductances (resistances) clearly reveal the structure of LLs.
  • The stoichiometric "111" iron-based superconductor, LiFeAs, has attacted great research interest in recent years. For the first time, we have successfully grown LiFeAs thin film by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on SrTiO3(001) substrate, and studied the interfacial growth behavior by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (LT-STM). The effects of substrate temperature and Li/Fe flux ratio were investigated. Uniform LiFeAs film as thin as 3 quintuple-layer (QL) is formed. Superconducting gap appears in LiFeAs films thicker than 4 QL at 4.7 K. When the film is thicker than 13 QL, the superconducting gap determined by the distance between coherence peaks is about 7 meV, close to the value of bulk material. The ex situ transport measurement of thick LiFeAs film shows a sharp superconducting transition around 16 K. The upper critical field, Hc2(0)=13.0 T, is estimated from the temperature dependent magnetoresistance. The precise thickness and quality control of LiFeAs film paves the road of growing similar ultrathin iron arsenide films.
  • We investigate theoretically the electronic structure of graphene and boron nitride (BN) lateral heterostructures, which were fabricated in recent experiments. The first-principles density functional calculation demonstrates that a huge intrinsic transverse electric field can be induced in the graphene nanoribbon region, and depends sensitively on the edge configuration of the lateral heterostructure. The polarized electric field originates from the charge mismatch at the BN-graphene interfaces. This huge electric field can open a significant bang gap in graphene nanoribbon, and lead to fully spinpolarized edge states and induce half-metallic phase in the lateral BN/Graphene/BN heterostructure with proper edge configurations.
  • We investigate the scattering and localization properties of edge and bulk states in a disordered two-dimensional topological insulator when they coexist at the same fermi energy. Due to edge-bulk backscattering (which is not prohibited \emph{a priori} by topology or symmetry), Anderson disorder makes the edge and bulk states localized indistinguishably. Two methods are proposed to effectively decouple them and to restore robust transport. The first kind of decouple is from long range disorder, since edge and bulk states are well separated in $k$ space. The second one is from an edge gating, owing to the edge nature of edge states in real space. The latter can be used to electrically tune a system between an Anderson insulator and a topologically robust conductor, i.e., a realization of a topological transistor.
  • The application of a perpendicular electric field can drive silicene into a gapless state, characterized by two nearly fully spin-polarized Dirac cones owing to both relatively large spin-orbital interactions and inversion symmetry breaking. Here we argue that since inter-valley scattering from non-magnetic impurities is highly suppressed by time reversal symmetry, the physics should be effectively single-Dirac-cone like. Through numerical calculations, we demonstrate that there is no significant backscattering from a single impurity that is non-magnetic and unit-cell uniform, indicating a stable delocalized state. This conjecture is then further confirmed from a scaling of conductance for disordered systems using the same type of impurities.
  • We demonstrate theoretically that interface engineering can drive Germanium, one of the most commonly-used semiconductors, into topological insulating phase. Utilizing giant electric fields generated by charge accumulation at GaAs/Ge/GaAs opposite semiconductor interfaces and band folding, the new design can reduce the sizable gap in Ge and induce large spin-orbit interaction, which lead to a topological insulator transition. Our work provides a new method on realizing TI in commonly-used semiconductors and suggests a promising approach to integrate it in well developed semiconductor electronic devices.
  • The generation of valley current is a fundamental goal in graphene valleytronics but no practical ways of its realization are known yet. We propose a workable scheme for the generation of bulk valley current in a graphene mechanical resonator through adiabatic cyclic deformations of the strains and chemical potential in the suspended region. The accompanied strain gauge fields can break the spatial mirror symmetry of the problem within each of the two inequivalent valleys, leading to a fnite valley current due to quantum pumping. An all-electrical measurement configuration is designed to detect the novel state with pure bulk valley currents.