• This paper studies model selection consistency for high dimensional sparse regression when data exhibits both cross-sectional and serial dependency. Most commonly-used model selection methods fail to consistently recover the true model when the covariates are highly correlated. Motivated by econometric studies, we consider the case where covariate dependence can be reduced through factor model, and propose a consistent strategy named Factor-Adjusted Regularized Model Selection (FarmSelect). By separating the latent factors from idiosyncratic components, we transform the problem from model selection with highly correlated covariates to that with weakly correlated variables. Model selection consistency as well as optimal rates of convergence are obtained under mild conditions. Numerical studies demonstrate the nice finite sample performance in terms of both model selection and out-of-sample prediction. Moreover, our method is flexible in a sense that it pays no price for weakly correlated and uncorrelated cases. Our method is applicable to a wide range of high dimensional sparse regression problems. An R-package FarmSelect is also provided for implementation.
  • This paper is concerned with the problem of top-$K$ ranking from pairwise comparisons. Given a collection of $n$ items and a few pairwise comparisons across them, one wishes to identify the set of $K$ items that receive the highest ranks. To tackle this problem, we adopt the logistic parametric model --- the Bradley-Terry-Luce model, where each item is assigned a latent preference score, and where the outcome of each pairwise comparison depends solely on the relative scores of the two items involved. Recent works have made significant progress towards characterizing the performance (e.g. the mean square error for estimating the scores) of several classical methods, including the spectral method and the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE). However, where they stand regarding top-$K$ ranking remains unsettled. We demonstrate that under a natural random sampling model, the spectral method alone, or the regularized MLE alone, is minimax optimal in terms of the sample complexity --- the number of paired comparisons needed to ensure exact top-$K$ identification, for the fixed dynamic range regime. This is accomplished via optimal control of the entrywise error of the score estimates. We complement our theoretical studies by numerical experiments, confirming that both methods yield low entrywise errors for estimating the underlying scores. Our theory is established via a novel leave-one-out trick, which proves effective for analyzing both iterative and non-iterative procedures. Along the way, we derive an elementary eigenvector perturbation bound for probability transition matrices, which parallels the Davis-Kahan $\sin\Theta$ theorem for symmetric matrices. This also allows us to close the gap between the $\ell_2$ error upper bound for the spectral method and the minimax lower limit.
  • Principal component analysis (PCA) is fundamental to statistical machine learning. It extracts latent principal factors that contribute to the most variation of the data. When data are stored across multiple machines, however, communication cost can prohibit the computation of PCA in a central location and distributed algorithms for PCA are thus needed. This paper proposes and studies a distributed PCA algorithm: each node machine computes the top $K$ eigenvectors and transmits them to the central server; the central server then aggregates the information from all the node machines and conducts a PCA based on the aggregated information. We investigate the bias and variance for the resulting distributed estimator of the top $K$ eigenvectors. In particular, we show that for distributions with symmetric innovation, the empirical top eigenspaces are unbiased and hence the distributed PCA is "unbiased". We derive the rate of convergence for distributed PCA estimators, which depends explicitly on the effective rank of covariance, eigen-gap, and the number of machines. We show that when the number of machines is not unreasonably large, the distributed PCA performs as well as the whole sample PCA, even without full access of whole data. The theoretical results are verified by an extensive simulation study. We also extend our analysis to the heterogeneous case where the population covariance matrices are different across local machines but share similar top eigen-structures.
  • Recovering low-rank structures via eigenvector perturbation analysis is a common problem in statistical machine learning, such as in factor analysis, community detection, ranking, matrix completion, among others. While a large variety of bounds are available for average errors between empirical and population statistics of eigenvectors, few results are tight for entrywise analyses, which are critical for a number of problems such as community detection. This paper investigates entrywise behaviors of eigenvectors for a large class of random matrices whose expectations are low-rank, which helps settle the conjecture in Abbe et al. (2014b) that the spectral algorithm achieves exact recovery in the stochastic block model without any trimming or cleaning steps. The key is a first-order approximation of eigenvectors under the $\ell_\infty$ norm: $$u_k \approx \frac{A u_k^*}{\lambda_k^*},$$ where $\{u_k\}$ and $\{u_k^*\}$ are eigenvectors of a random matrix $A$ and its expectation $\mathbb{E} A$, respectively. The fact that the approximation is both tight and linear in $A$ facilitates sharp comparisons between $u_k$ and $u_k^*$. In particular, it allows for comparing the signs of $u_k$ and $u_k^*$ even if $\| u_k - u_k^*\|_{\infty}$ is large. The results are further extended to perturbations of eigenspaces, yielding new $\ell_\infty$-type bounds for synchronization ($\mathbb{Z}_2$-spiked Wigner model) and noisy matrix completion.
  • This paper is devoted to an interacting particle system that provides probabilistic interpretation of the wave equation on graphs. A Feynman-Kac-type formula is established, connecting the expectation of the process with the wave equation on graphs. Non-asymptotic $L^2$ estimates are presented. It is then shown that the high-density hydrodynamic limit of the system is given by the wave equation in Euclidean space. The sharpness of scaling limit result is demonstrated by a phase transition phenomenon.