• We address the problem of automatic American Sign Language fingerspelling recognition from video. Prior work has largely relied on frame-level labels, hand-crafted features, or other constraints, and has been hampered by the scarcity of data for this task. We introduce a model for fingerspelling recognition that addresses these issues. The model consists of an auto-encoder-based feature extractor and an attention-based neural encoder-decoder, which are trained jointly. The model receives a sequence of image frames and outputs the fingerspelled word, without relying on any frame-level training labels or hand-crafted features. In addition, the auto-encoder subcomponent makes it possible to leverage unlabeled data to improve the feature learning. The model achieves 11.6% and 4.4% absolute letter accuracy improvement respectively in signer-independent and signer-adapted fingerspelling recognition over previous approaches that required frame-level training labels.
  • There is growing interest in models that can learn from unlabelled speech paired with visual context. This setting is relevant for low-resource speech processing, robotics, and human language acquisition research. Here we study how a visually grounded speech model, trained on images of scenes paired with spoken captions, captures aspects of semantics. We use an external image tagger to generate soft text labels from images, which serve as targets for a neural model that maps untranscribed speech to (semantic) keyword labels. We introduce a newly collected data set of human semantic relevance judgements and an associated task, semantic speech retrieval, where the goal is to search for spoken utterances that are semantically relevant to a given text query. Without seeing any text, the model trained on parallel speech and images achieves a precision of almost 60% on its top ten semantic retrievals. Compared to a supervised model trained on transcriptions, our model matches human judgements better by some measures, especially in retrieving non-verbatim semantic matches. We perform an extensive analysis of the model and its resulting representations.
  • In conversational speech, the acoustic signal provides cues that help listeners disambiguate difficult parses. For automatically parsing spoken utterances, we introduce a model that integrates transcribed text and acoustic-prosodic features using a convolutional neural network over energy and pitch trajectories coupled with an attention-based recurrent neural network that accepts text and prosodic features. We find that different types of acoustic-prosodic features are individually helpful, and together give statistically significant improvements in parse and disfluency detection F1 scores over a strong text-only baseline. For this study with known sentence boundaries, error analyses show that the main benefit of acoustic-prosodic features is in sentences with disfluencies, attachment decisions are most improved, and transcription errors obscure gains from prosody.
  • Speech-to-text translation has many potential applications for low-resource languages, but the typical approach of cascading speech recognition with machine translation is often impossible, since the transcripts needed to train a speech recognizer are usually not available for low-resource languages. Recent work has found that neural encoder-decoder models can learn to directly translate foreign speech in high-resource scenarios, without the need for intermediate transcription. We investigate whether this approach also works in settings where both data and computation are limited. To make the approach efficient, we make several architectural changes, including a change from character-level to word-level decoding. We find that this choice yields crucial speed improvements that allow us to train with fewer computational resources, yet still performs well on frequent words. We explore models trained on between 20 and 160 hours of data, and find that although models trained on less data have considerably lower BLEU scores, they can still predict words with relatively high precision and recall---around 50% for a model trained on 50 hours of data, versus around 60% for the full 160 hour model. Thus, they may still be useful for some low-resource scenarios.
  • Previous work has shown that it is possible to improve speech recognition by learning acoustic features from paired acoustic-articulatory data, for example by using canonical correlation analysis (CCA) or its deep extensions. One limitation of this prior work is that the learned feature models are difficult to port to new datasets or domains, and articulatory data is not available for most speech corpora. In this work we study the problem of acoustic feature learning in the setting where we have access to an external, domain-mismatched dataset of paired speech and articulatory measurements, either with or without labels. We develop methods for acoustic feature learning in these settings, based on deep variational CCA and extensions that use both source and target domain data and labels. Using this approach, we improve phonetic recognition accuracies on both TIMIT and Wall Street Journal and analyze a number of design choices.
  • Connectionist temporal classification (CTC) is a popular sequence prediction approach for automatic speech recognition that is typically used with models based on recurrent neural networks (RNNs). We explore whether deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) can be used effectively instead of RNNs as the "encoder" in CTC. CNNs lack an explicit representation of the entire sequence, but have the advantage that they are much faster to train. We present an exploration of CNNs as encoders for CTC models, in the context of character-based (lexicon-free) automatic speech recognition. In particular, we explore a range of one-dimensional convolutional layers, which are particularly efficient. We compare the performance of our CNN-based models against typical RNNbased models in terms of training time, decoding time, model size and word error rate (WER) on the Switchboard Eval2000 corpus. We find that our CNN-based models are close in performance to LSTMs, while not matching them, and are much faster to train and decode.
  • Unsupervised segmentation and clustering of unlabelled speech are core problems in zero-resource speech processing. Most approaches lie at methodological extremes: some use probabilistic Bayesian models with convergence guarantees, while others opt for more efficient heuristic techniques. Despite competitive performance in previous work, the full Bayesian approach is difficult to scale to large speech corpora. We introduce an approximation to a recent Bayesian model that still has a clear objective function but improves efficiency by using hard clustering and segmentation rather than full Bayesian inference. Like its Bayesian counterpart, this embedded segmental K-means model (ES-KMeans) represents arbitrary-length word segments as fixed-dimensional acoustic word embeddings. We first compare ES-KMeans to previous approaches on common English and Xitsonga data sets (5 and 2.5 hours of speech): ES-KMeans outperforms a leading heuristic method in word segmentation, giving similar scores to the Bayesian model while being 5 times faster with fewer hyperparameters. However, its clusters are less pure than those of the other models. We then show that ES-KMeans scales to larger corpora by applying it to the 5 languages of the Zero Resource Speech Challenge 2017 (up to 45 hours), where it performs competitively compared to the challenge baseline.
  • We study the problem of acoustic feature learning in the setting where we have access to another (non-acoustic) modality for feature learning but not at test time. We use deep variational canonical correlation analysis (VCCA), a recently proposed deep generative method for multi-view representation learning. We also extend VCCA with improved latent variable priors and with adversarial learning. Compared to other techniques for multi-view feature learning, VCCA's advantages include an intuitive latent variable interpretation and a variational lower bound objective that can be trained end-to-end efficiently. We compare VCCA and its extensions with previous feature learning methods on the University of Wisconsin X-ray Microbeam Database, and show that VCCA-based feature learning improves over previous methods for speaker-independent phonetic recognition.
  • Segmental models are an alternative to frame-based models for sequence prediction, where hypothesized path weights are based on entire segment scores rather than a single frame at a time. Neural segmental models are segmental models that use neural network-based weight functions. Neural segmental models have achieved competitive results for speech recognition, and their end-to-end training has been explored in several studies. In this work, we review neural segmental models, which can be viewed as consisting of a neural network-based acoustic encoder and a finite-state transducer decoder. We study end-to-end segmental models with different weight functions, including ones based on frame-level neural classifiers and on segmental recurrent neural networks. We study how reducing the search space size impacts performance under different weight functions. We also compare several loss functions for end-to-end training. Finally, we explore training approaches, including multi-stage vs. end-to-end training and multitask training that combines segmental and frame-level losses.
  • Query-by-example search often uses dynamic time warping (DTW) for comparing queries and proposed matching segments. Recent work has shown that comparing speech segments by representing them as fixed-dimensional vectors --- acoustic word embeddings --- and measuring their vector distance (e.g., cosine distance) can discriminate between words more accurately than DTW-based approaches. We consider an approach to query-by-example search that embeds both the query and database segments according to a neural model, followed by nearest-neighbor search to find the matching segments. Earlier work on embedding-based query-by-example, using template-based acoustic word embeddings, achieved competitive performance. We find that our embeddings, based on recurrent neural networks trained to optimize word discrimination, achieve substantial improvements in performance and run-time efficiency over the previous approaches.
  • We present models for embedding words in the context of surrounding words. Such models, which we refer to as token embeddings, represent the characteristics of a word that are specific to a given context, such as word sense, syntactic category, and semantic role. We explore simple, efficient token embedding models based on standard neural network architectures. We learn token embeddings on a large amount of unannotated text and evaluate them as features for part-of-speech taggers and dependency parsers trained on much smaller amounts of annotated data. We find that predictors endowed with token embeddings consistently outperform baseline predictors across a range of context window and training set sizes.
  • During language acquisition, infants have the benefit of visual cues to ground spoken language. Robots similarly have access to audio and visual sensors. Recent work has shown that images and spoken captions can be mapped into a meaningful common space, allowing images to be retrieved using speech and vice versa. In this setting of images paired with untranscribed spoken captions, we consider whether computer vision systems can be used to obtain textual labels for the speech. Concretely, we use an image-to-words multi-label visual classifier to tag images with soft textual labels, and then train a neural network to map from the speech to these soft targets. We show that the resulting speech system is able to predict which words occur in an utterance---acting as a spoken bag-of-words classifier---without seeing any parallel speech and text. We find that the model often confuses semantically related words, e.g. "man" and "person", making it even more effective as a semantic keyword spotter.
  • End-to-end training of deep learning-based models allows for implicit learning of intermediate representations based on the final task loss. However, the end-to-end approach ignores the useful domain knowledge encoded in explicit intermediate-level supervision. We hypothesize that using intermediate representations as auxiliary supervision at lower levels of deep networks may be a good way of combining the advantages of end-to-end training and more traditional pipeline approaches. We present experiments on conversational speech recognition where we use lower-level tasks, such as phoneme recognition, in a multitask training approach with an encoder-decoder model for direct character transcription. We compare multiple types of lower-level tasks and analyze the effects of the auxiliary tasks. Our results on the Switchboard corpus show that this approach improves recognition accuracy over a standard encoder-decoder model on the Eval2000 test set.
  • Recent work has begun exploring neural acoustic word embeddings---fixed-dimensional vector representations of arbitrary-length speech segments corresponding to words. Such embeddings are applicable to speech retrieval and recognition tasks, where reasoning about whole words may make it possible to avoid ambiguous sub-word representations. The main idea is to map acoustic sequences to fixed-dimensional vectors such that examples of the same word are mapped to similar vectors, while different-word examples are mapped to very different vectors. In this work we take a multi-view approach to learning acoustic word embeddings, in which we jointly learn to embed acoustic sequences and their corresponding character sequences. We use deep bidirectional LSTM embedding models and multi-view contrastive losses. We study the effect of different loss variants, including fixed-margin and cost-sensitive losses. Our acoustic word embeddings improve over previous approaches for the task of word discrimination. We also present results on other tasks that are enabled by the multi-view approach, including cross-view word discrimination and word similarity.
  • We present deep variational canonical correlation analysis (VCCA), a deep multi-view learning model that extends the latent variable model interpretation of linear CCA to nonlinear observation models parameterized by deep neural networks. We derive variational lower bounds of the data likelihood by parameterizing the posterior probability of the latent variables from the view that is available at test time. We also propose a variant of VCCA called VCCA-private that can, in addition to the "common variables" underlying both views, extract the "private variables" within each view, and disentangles the shared and private information for multi-view data without hard supervision. Experimental results on real-world datasets show that our methods are competitive across domains.
  • Acoustic word embeddings --- fixed-dimensional vector representations of variable-length spoken word segments --- have begun to be considered for tasks such as speech recognition and query-by-example search. Such embeddings can be learned discriminatively so that they are similar for speech segments corresponding to the same word, while being dissimilar for segments corresponding to different words. Recent work has found that acoustic word embeddings can outperform dynamic time warping on query-by-example search and related word discrimination tasks. However, the space of embedding models and training approaches is still relatively unexplored. In this paper we present new discriminative embedding models based on recurrent neural networks (RNNs). We consider training losses that have been successful in prior work, in particular a cross entropy loss for word classification and a contrastive loss that explicitly aims to separate same-word and different-word pairs in a "Siamese network" training setting. We find that both classifier-based and Siamese RNN embeddings improve over previously reported results on a word discrimination task, with Siamese RNNs outperforming classification models. In addition, we present analyses of the learned embeddings and the effects of variables such as dimensionality and network structure.
  • Recent work on discriminative segmental models has shown that they can achieve competitive speech recognition performance, using features based on deep neural frame classifiers. However, segmental models can be more challenging to train than standard frame-based approaches. While some segmental models have been successfully trained end to end, there is a lack of understanding of their training under different settings and with different losses. We investigate a model class based on recent successful approaches, consisting of a linear model that combines segmental features based on an LSTM frame classifier. Similarly to hybrid HMM-neural network models, segmental models of this class can be trained in two stages (frame classifier training followed by linear segmental model weight training), end to end (joint training of both frame classifier and linear weights), or with end-to-end fine-tuning after two-stage training. We study segmental models trained end to end with hinge loss, log loss, latent hinge loss, and marginal log loss. We consider several losses for the case where training alignments are available as well as where they are not. We find that in general, marginal log loss provides the most consistent strong performance without requiring ground-truth alignments. We also find that training with dropout is very important in obtaining good performance with end-to-end training. Finally, the best results are typically obtained by a combination of two-stage training and fine-tuning.
  • We propose an attention-enabled encoder-decoder model for the problem of grapheme-to-phoneme conversion. Most previous work has tackled the problem via joint sequence models that require explicit alignments for training. In contrast, the attention-enabled encoder-decoder model allows for jointly learning to align and convert characters to phonemes. We explore different types of attention models, including global and local attention, and our best models achieve state-of-the-art results on three standard data sets (CMUDict, Pronlex, and NetTalk).
  • We study the problem of recognizing video sequences of fingerspelled letters in American Sign Language (ASL). Fingerspelling comprises a significant but relatively understudied part of ASL. Recognizing fingerspelling is challenging for a number of reasons: It involves quick, small motions that are often highly coarticulated; it exhibits significant variation between signers; and there has been a dearth of continuous fingerspelling data collected. In this work we collect and annotate a new data set of continuous fingerspelling videos, compare several types of recognizers, and explore the problem of signer variation. Our best-performing models are segmental (semi-Markov) conditional random fields using deep neural network-based features. In the signer-dependent setting, our recognizers achieve up to about 92% letter accuracy. The multi-signer setting is much more challenging, but with neural network adaptation we achieve up to 83% letter accuracies in this setting.
  • Discriminative segmental models, such as segmental conditional random fields (SCRFs) and segmental structured support vector machines (SSVMs), have had success in speech recognition via both lattice rescoring and first-pass decoding. However, such models suffer from slow decoding, hampering the use of computationally expensive features, such as segment neural networks or other high-order features. A typical solution is to use approximate decoding, either by beam pruning in a single pass or by beam pruning to generate a lattice followed by a second pass. In this work, we study discriminative segmental models trained with a hinge loss (i.e., segmental structured SVMs). We show that beam search is not suitable for learning rescoring models in this approach, though it gives good approximate decoding performance when the model is already well-trained. Instead, we consider an approach inspired by structured prediction cascades, which use max-marginal pruning to generate lattices. We obtain a high-accuracy phonetic recognition system with several expensive feature types: a segment neural network, a second-order language model, and second-order phone boundary features.
  • Discriminative segmental models offer a way to incorporate flexible feature functions into speech recognition. However, their appeal has been limited by their computational requirements, due to the large number of possible segments to consider. Multi-pass cascades of segmental models introduce features of increasing complexity in different passes, where in each pass a segmental model rescores lattices produced by a previous (simpler) segmental model. In this paper, we explore several ways of making segmental cascades efficient and practical: reducing the feature set in the first pass, frame subsampling, and various pruning approaches. In experiments on phonetic recognition, we find that with a combination of such techniques, it is possible to maintain competitive performance while greatly reducing decoding, pruning, and training time.
  • We present Charagram embeddings, a simple approach for learning character-based compositional models to embed textual sequences. A word or sentence is represented using a character n-gram count vector, followed by a single nonlinear transformation to yield a low-dimensional embedding. We use three tasks for evaluation: word similarity, sentence similarity, and part-of-speech tagging. We demonstrate that Charagram embeddings outperform more complex architectures based on character-level recurrent and convolutional neural networks, achieving new state-of-the-art performance on several similarity tasks.
  • We consider the supervised training setting in which we learn task-specific word embeddings. We assume that we start with initial embeddings learned from unlabelled data and update them to learn task-specific embeddings for words in the supervised training data. However, for new words in the test set, we must use either their initial embeddings or a single unknown embedding, which often leads to errors. We address this by learning a neural network to map from initial embeddings to the task-specific embedding space, via a multi-loss objective function. The technique is general, but here we demonstrate its use for improved dependency parsing (especially for sentences with out-of-vocabulary words), as well as for downstream improvements on sentiment analysis.
  • We consider the problem of learning general-purpose, paraphrastic sentence embeddings based on supervision from the Paraphrase Database (Ganitkevitch et al., 2013). We compare six compositional architectures, evaluating them on annotated textual similarity datasets drawn both from the same distribution as the training data and from a wide range of other domains. We find that the most complex architectures, such as long short-term memory (LSTM) recurrent neural networks, perform best on the in-domain data. However, in out-of-domain scenarios, simple architectures such as word averaging vastly outperform LSTMs. Our simplest averaging model is even competitive with systems tuned for the particular tasks while also being extremely efficient and easy to use. In order to better understand how these architectures compare, we conduct further experiments on three supervised NLP tasks: sentence similarity, entailment, and sentiment classification. We again find that the word averaging models perform well for sentence similarity and entailment, outperforming LSTMs. However, on sentiment classification, we find that the LSTM performs very strongly-even recording new state-of-the-art performance on the Stanford Sentiment Treebank. We then demonstrate how to combine our pretrained sentence embeddings with these supervised tasks, using them both as a prior and as a black box feature extractor. This leads to performance rivaling the state of the art on the SICK similarity and entailment tasks. We release all of our resources to the research community with the hope that they can serve as the new baseline for further work on universal sentence embeddings.
  • Kernel canonical correlation analysis (KCCA) is a nonlinear multi-view representation learning technique with broad applicability in statistics and machine learning. Although there is a closed-form solution for the KCCA objective, it involves solving an $N\times N$ eigenvalue system where $N$ is the training set size, making its computational requirements in both memory and time prohibitive for large-scale problems. Various approximation techniques have been developed for KCCA. A commonly used approach is to first transform the original inputs to an $M$-dimensional random feature space so that inner products in the feature space approximate kernel evaluations, and then apply linear CCA to the transformed inputs. In many applications, however, the dimensionality $M$ of the random feature space may need to be very large in order to obtain a sufficiently good approximation; it then becomes challenging to perform the linear CCA step on the resulting very high-dimensional data matrices. We show how to use a stochastic optimization algorithm, recently proposed for linear CCA and its neural-network extension, to further alleviate the computation requirements of approximate KCCA. This approach allows us to run approximate KCCA on a speech dataset with $1.4$ million training samples and a random feature space of dimensionality $M=100000$ on a typical workstation.