• We present deep observations of a $z=1.4$ massive, star-forming galaxy in molecular and ionized gas at comparable spatial resolution (CO 3-2, NOEMA; H$\alpha$, LBT). The kinematic tracers agree well, indicating that both gas phases are subject to the same gravitational potential and physical processes affecting the gas dynamics. We combine the one-dimensional velocity and velocity dispersion profiles in CO and H$\alpha$ to forward-model the galaxy in a Bayesian framework, combining a thick exponential disk, a bulge, and a dark matter halo. We determine the dynamical support due to baryons and dark matter, and find a dark matter fraction within one effective radius of $f_{\rm DM}(\leq$$R_{e})=0.18^{+0.06}_{-0.04}$. Our result strengthens the evidence for strong baryon-dominance on galactic scales of massive $z\sim1-3$ star-forming galaxies recently found based on ionized gas kinematics alone.
  • The sample of 566 molecular clouds identified in the CO(2--1) IRAM survey covering the disk of M~33 is explored in detail.The clouds were found using CPROPS and were subsequently catalogued in terms of their star-forming properties as non-star-forming (A), with embedded star formation (B), or with exposed star formation C.We find that the size-linewidth relation among the M~33 clouds is quite weak but, when comparing with clouds in other nearby galaxies, the linewidth scales with average metallicity.The linewidth and particularly the line brightness decrease with galactocentric distance.The large number of clouds makes it possible to calculate well-sampled cloud mass spectra and mass spectra of subsamples.As noted earlier, but considerably better defined here, the mass spectrum steepens (i.e. higher fraction of small clouds) with galactocentric distance.A new finding is that the mass spectrum of A clouds is much steeper than that of the star-forming clouds.Further dividing the sample, this difference is strong at both large and small galactocentric distances and the A vs C difference is a stronger effect than the inner/outer disk difference in mass spectra.Velocity gradients are identified in the clouds using standard techniques.The gradients are weak and are dominated by prograde rotation; the effect is stronger for the high signal-to-noise clouds.A discussion of the uncertainties is presented.The angular momenta are low but compatible with at least some simulations.The cloud and galactic gradients are similar; the cloud rotation periods are much longer than cloud lifetimes and comparable to the galactic rotation period.The rotational kinetic energy is 1-2\% of the gravitational potential energy and the cloud edge velocity is well below the escape velocity, such that cloud-scale rotation probably has little influence on the evolution of molecular clouds.
  • Millimeter-wave continuum astronomy is today an indispensable tool for both general Astrophysics studies and Cosmology. General purpose, large field-of-view instruments are needed to map the sky at intermediate angular scales not accessible by the high-resolution interferometers and by the coarse angular resolution space-borne or ground-based surveys. These instruments have to be installed at the focal plane of the largest single-dish telescopes. In this context, we have constructed and deployed a multi-thousands pixels dual-band (150 and 260 GHz, respectively 2mm and 1.15mm wavelengths) camera to image an instantaneous field-of-view of 6.5arc-min and configurable to map the linear polarization at 260GHz. We are providing a detailed description of this instrument, named NIKA2 (New IRAM KID Arrays 2), in particular focusing on the cryogenics, the optics, the focal plane arrays based on Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID) and the readout electronics. We are presenting the performance measured on the sky during the commissioning runs that took place between October 2015 and April 2017 at the 30-meter IRAM (Institut of Millimetric Radio Astronomy) telescope at Pico Veleta. NIKA2 has been successfully deployed and commissioned, performing in-line with the ambitious expectations. In particular, NIKA2 exhibits FWHM angular resolutions of around 11 and 17.5 arc-seconds at respectively 260 and 150GHz. The NEFD (Noise Equivalent Flux Densities) demonstrated on the maps are, at these two respective frequencies, 33 and 8 mJy*sqrt(s). A first successful science verification run has been achieved in April 2017. The instrument is currently offered to the astronomical community during the coming winter and will remain available for at least the next ten years.
  • We introduce xCOLD GASS, a legacy survey providing a census of molecular gas in the local Universe. Building upon the original COLD GASS survey, we present here the full sample of 532 galaxies with CO(1-0) measurements from the IRAM-30m telescope. The sample is mass-selected in the redshift interval $0.01<z<0.05$ from SDSS, and therefore representative of the local galaxy population with M$_{\ast}>10^9$M$_{\odot}$. The CO(1-0) flux measurements are complemented by observations of the CO(2-1) line with both the IRAM-30m and APEX telescopes, HI observations from Arecibo, and photometry from SDSS, WISE and GALEX. Combining the IRAM and APEX data, we find that the CO(2-1) to CO(1-0) luminosity ratio for integrated measurements is $r_{21}=0.79\pm0.03$, with no systematic variations across the sample. The CO(1-0) luminosity function is constructed and best fit with a Schechter function with parameters {$L_{\mathrm{CO}}^* = (7.77\pm2.11) \times 10^9\,\mathrm{K\,km\,s^{-1}\, pc^{2}}$, $\phi^{*} = (9.84\pm5.41) \times 10^{-4} \, \mathrm{Mpc^{-3}}$ and $\alpha = -1.19\pm0.05$}. With the sample now complete down to stellar masses of $10^9$M$_{\odot}$, we are able to extend our study of gas scaling relations and confirm that both molecular gas fraction and depletion timescale vary with specific star formation rate (or offset from the star-formation main sequence) much more strongly than they depend on stellar mass. Comparing the xCOLD GASS results with outputs from hydrodynamic and semi-analytic models, we highlight the constraining power of cold gas scaling relations on models of galaxy formation.
  • To shed light on the time evolution of local star formation episodes in M33, we study the association between 566 Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs), identified through the CO (J=2-1) IRAM-all-disk survey, and 630 Young Stellar Cluster Candidates (YSCCs), selected via Spitzer-24~$\mu$m emission. The spatial correlation between YSCCs and GMCs is extremely strong, with a typical separation of 17~pc, less than half the CO(2--1) beamsize, illustrating the remarkable physical link between the two populations. GMCs and YSCCs follow the HI filaments, except in the outermost regions where the survey finds fewer GMCs than YSCCs, likely due to undetected, low CO-luminosity clouds. The GMCs have masses between 2$\times 10^4$ and 2$\times 10^6$ M$_\odot$ and are classified according to different cloud evolutionary stages: inactive clouds are 32$\%$ of the total, classified clouds with embedded and exposed star formation are 16$\%$ and 52$\%$ of the total respectively. Across the regular southern spiral arm, inactive clouds are preferentially located in the inner part of the arm, possibly suggesting a triggering of star formation as the cloud crosses the arm. Some YSCCs are embedded star-forming sites while the majority have GALEX-UV and H$\alpha$ counterparts with estimated cluster masses and ages. The distribution of the non-embedded YSCC ages peaks around 5~Myrs with only a few being as old as 8--10~Myrs. These age estimates together with the number of GMCs in the various evolutionary stages lead us to conclude that 14~Myrs is a typical lifetime of a GMC in M33, prior to cloud dispersal. The inactive and embedded phases are short, lasting about 4 and 2~Myrs respectively. This underlines that embedded YSCCs rapidly break out from the clouds and become partially visible in H$\alpha$ or UV long before cloud dispersal.
  • We present a wide area (~ 8 x 8 kpc), sensitive map of CO (2-1) emission around the nearby starburst galaxy M82. Molecular gas extends far beyond the stellar disk, including emission associated with the well-known outflow as far as 3 kpc from M82's midplane. Kinematic signatures of the outflow are visible in both the CO and HI emission: both tracers show a minor axis velocity gradient and together they show double peaked profiles, consistent with a hot outflow bounded by a cone made of a mix of atomic and molecular gas. Combining our CO and HI data with observations of the dust continuum, we study the changing properties of the cold outflow as it leaves the disk. While H_2 dominates the ISM near the disk, the dominant phase of the cool medium changes as it leaves the galaxy and becomes mostly atomic after about a kpc. Several arguments suggest that regardless of phase, the mass in the cold outflow does not make it far from the disk; the mass flux through surfaces above the disk appears to decline with a projected scale length of ~ 1-2 kpc. The cool material must also end up distributed over a much wider angle than the hot outflow based on the nearly circular isophotes of dust and CO at low intensity and the declining rotation velocities as a function of height from the plane. The minor axis of M82 appears so striking at many wavelengths because the interface between the hot wind cavity and the cool gas produces Halpha, hot dust, PAH emission, and scattered UV light. We also show the level at which a face-on version of M82 would be detectable as an outflow based on unresolved spectroscopy. Finally, we consider multiple constraints on the CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor, which must change across the galaxy but appears to be only a factor of ~ 2 lower than the Galactic value in the outflow.
  • [Abridged] We present maps of CO 2-1 emission covering the entire star-forming disks of 16 nearby dwarf galaxies observed by the IRAM HERACLES survey. The data have 13 arcsec angular resolution, ~250 pc at our average distance of 4 Mpc, and sample the galaxies by 10-1000 resolution elements. We apply stacking techniques to perform the first sensitive search for CO emission in dwarfs outside the Local Group ranging from single lines-of-sight, stacked over IR-bright regions of embedded star formation, and stacked over the entire galaxy. We detect 5 dwarfs in CO with total luminosities of L_CO = 3-28 1e6 Kkmspc2. The other 11 dwarfs remain undetected in CO even in the stacked data and have L_CO < 0.4-8 1e6 Kkmspc2. We combine our sample of dwarfs with a large literature sample of spirals to study scaling relations of L_CO with M_B and metallicity. We find that dwarfs with metallicities of Z ~ 1/2-1/10 Z_sun have L_CO about 1e2-1e4x smaller than spirals and that their L_CO per unit L_B is 10-100x smaller. A comparison with tracers of star formation (FUV and 24 micron) shows that L_CO per unit SFR is 10-100x smaller in dwarfs. One possible interpretation is that dwarfs form stars much more efficiently, however we argue that the low L_CO/SFR ratio is due to significant changes of the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, alpha_CO, in low metallicity environments. Assuming a constant H2 depletion time of 1.8 Gyr (as found for nearby spirals) implies alpha_CO values for dwarfs with Z ~ 1/2-1/10 Z_sun that are more than 10x higher than those found in solar metallicity spirals. This significant increase of alpha_CO at low metallicity is consistent with previous studies, in particular those which model dust emission to constrain H2 masses. Even though it is difficult to parameterize the metallicity dependence of alpha_CO, our results suggest that CO is increasingly difficult to detect at lower metallicities.
  • We use the IRAM HERACLES survey to study CO emission from 33 nearby spiral galaxies down to very low intensities. Using atomic hydrogen (HI) data, mostly from THINGS, we predict the local mean CO velocity from the mean HI velocity. By renormalizing the CO velocity axis so that zero corresponds to the local mean HI velocity we are able to stack spectra coherently over large regions as function of radius. This enables us to measure CO intensities with high significance as low as Ico = 0.3 K km/s (H2_SD = 1 Msun/pc2), an improvement of about one order of magnitude over previous studies. We detect CO out to radii Rgal = R25 and find the CO radial profile to follow a uniform exponential decline with scale length of 0.2 R25. Comparing our sensitive CO profiles to matched profiles of HI, Halpha, FUV, and IR emission at 24um and 70um, we observe a tight, roughly linear relation between CO and IR intensity that does not show any notable break between regions that are dominated by molecular (H2) gas (H2_SD > HI_SD) and those dominated by atomic gas (H2_SD < HI_SD). We use combinations of FUV+24um and Halpha+24um to estimate the recent star formation rate (SFR) surface density, SFR_SD, and find approximately linear relations between SFR_SD and H2_SD. We interpret this as evidence for stars forming in molecular gas with little dependence on the local total gas surface density. While galaxies display small internal variations in the SFR-to-H2 ratio, we do observe systematic galaxy-to-galaxy variations. These galaxy-to-galaxy variations dominate the scatter in relations between CO and SFR tracers measured at large scales. The variations have the sense that less massive galaxies exhibit larger ratios of SFR-to-CO than massive galaxies. Unlike the SFR-to-CO ratio, the balance between HI and H2 depends strongly on the total gas surface density and radius. It must also depend on additional parameters.
  • We study the relation between molecular gas and star formation in a volume-limited sample of 222 galaxies from the COLD GASS survey, with measurements of the CO(1-0) line from the IRAM 30m telescope. The galaxies are at redshifts 0.025<z<0.05 and have stellar masses in the range 10.0<log(M*/Msun)<11.5. The IRAM measurements are complemented by deep Arecibo HI observations and homogeneous SDSS and GALEX photometry. A reference sample that includes both UV and far-IR data is used to calibrate our estimates of star formation rates from the seven optical/UV bands. The mean molecular gas depletion timescale, tdep(H2), for all the galaxies in our sample is 1 Gyr, however tdep(H2) increases by a factor of 6 from a value of ~0.5 Gyr for galaxies with stellar masses of 10^10 Msun to ~3 Gyr for galaxies with masses of a few times 10^11 Msun. In contrast, the atomic gas depletion timescale remains contant at a value of around 3 Gyr. This implies that in high mass galaxies, molecular and atomic gas depletion timescales are comparable, but in low mass galaxies, molecular gas is being consumed much more quickly than atomic gas. The strongest dependences of tdep(H2) are on the stellar mass of the galaxy (parameterized as log tdep(H2)= (0.36+/-0.07)(log M* - 10.70)+(9.03+/-0.99)), and on the specific star formation rate. A single tdep(H2) versus sSFR relation is able to fit both "normal" star-forming galaxies in our COLD GASS sample, as well as more extreme starburst galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs), which have tdep(H2) < 10^8 yr. Normal galaxies at z=1-2 are displaced with respect to the local galaxy population in the tdep(H2) versus sSFR plane and have molecular gas depletion times that are a factor of 3-5 times longer at a given value of sSFR due to their significantly larger gas fractions.
  • We are conducting COLD GASS, a legacy survey for molecular gas in nearby galaxies. Using the IRAM 30m telescope, we measure the CO(1-0) line in a sample of ~350 nearby (D=100-200 Mpc), massive galaxies (log(M*/Msun)>10.0). The sample is selected purely according to stellar mass, and therefore provides an unbiased view of molecular gas in these systems. By combining the IRAM data with SDSS photometry and spectroscopy, GALEX imaging and high-quality Arecibo HI data, we investigate the partition of condensed baryons between stars, atomic gas and molecular gas in 0.1-10L* galaxies. In this paper, we present CO luminosities and molecular hydrogen masses for the first 222 galaxies. The overall CO detection rate is 54%, but our survey also uncovers the existence of sharp thresholds in galaxy structural parameters such as stellar mass surface density and concentration index, below which all galaxies have a measurable cold gas component but above which the detection rate of the CO line drops suddenly. The mean molecular gas fraction MH2/M* of the CO detections is 0.066+/-0.039, and this fraction does not depend on stellar mass, but is a strong function of NUV-r colour. Through stacking, we set a firm upper limit of MH2/M*=0.0016+/-0.0005 for red galaxies with NUV-r>5.0. The average molecular-to-atomic hydrogen ratio in present-day galaxies is 0.3, with significant scatter from one galaxy to the next. The existence of strong detection thresholds in both the HI and CO lines suggests that "quenching" processes have occurred in these systems. Intriguingly, atomic gas strongly dominates in the minority of galaxies with significant cold gas that lie above these thresholds. This suggests that some re-accretion of gas may still be possible following the quenching event.