• Here we describe a multi-compartment neuron circuit based on the Adaptive-Exponential I&F (AdEx) model, developed for the second-generation BrainScaleS hardware. Based on an existing modular Leaky Integrate-and-Fire (LIF) architecture designed in 65 nm CMOS, the circuit features exponential spike generation, neuronal adaptation, inter-compartmental connections as well as a conductance-based reset. The design reproduces a diverse set of firing patterns observed in cortical pyramidal neurons. Further, it enables the emulation of sodium and calcium spikes, as well as N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) plateau potentials known from apical and thin dendrites. We characterize the AdEx circuit extensions and exemplify how the interplay between passive and non-linear active signal processing enhances the computational capabilities of single (but structured) on-chip neurons.
  • Here we present an array of leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neuron circuits designed for the second-generation BrainScaleS mixed-signal 65-nm CMOS neuromorphic hardware. The neuronal array is embedded in the analog network core of a scaled-down prototype HICANN-DLS chip. Designed as continuous-time circuits, the neurons are highly tunable and reconfigurable elements with accelerated dynamics. Each neuron integrates input current from a multitude of incoming synapses and evokes a digital spike event output. The circuit offers a wide tuning range for synaptic and membrane time constants, as well as for refractory periods to cover a number of computational models. We elucidate our design methodology, underlying circuit design, calibration and measurement results from individual sub-circuits across multiple dies. The circuit dynamics match with the behavior of the LIF mathematical model. We further demonstrate a winner-take-all network on the prototype chip as a typical element of cortical processing.
  • Together with the Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics(KIP) the Fraunhofer IZM has developed a full wafer redistribution and embedding technology as base for a large-scale neuromorphic hardware system. The paper will give an overview of the neuromorphic computing platform at the KIP and the associated hardware requirements which drove the described technological developments. In the first phase of the project standard redistribution technologies from wafer level packaging were adapted to enable a high density reticle-to-reticle routing on 200mm CMOS wafers. Neighboring reticles were interconnected across the scribe lines with an 8{\mu}m pitch routing based on semi-additive copper metallization. Passivation by photo sensitive benzocyclobutene was used to enable a second intra-reticle routing layer. Final IO pads with flash gold were generated on top of each reticle. With that concept neuromorphic systems based on full wafers could be assembled and tested. The fabricated high density inter-reticle routing revealed a very high yield of larger than 99.9%. In order to allow an upscaling of the system size to a large number of wafers with feasible effort a full wafer embedding concept for printed circuit boards was developed and proven in the second phase of the project. The wafers were thinned to 250{\mu}m and laminated with additional prepreg layers and copper foils into a core material. After lamination of the PCB panel the reticle IOs of the embedded wafer were accessed by micro via drilling, copper electroplating, lithography and subtractive etching of the PCB wiring structure. The created wiring with 50um line width enabled an access of the reticle IOs on the embedded wafer as well as a board level routing. The panels with the embedded wafers were subsequently stressed with up to 1000 thermal cycles between 0C and 100C and have shown no severe failure formation over the cycle time.
  • Neural-network models of high-level brain functions such as memory recall and reasoning often rely on the presence of stochasticity. The majority of these models assumes that each neuron in the functional network is equipped with its own private source of randomness, often in the form of uncorrelated external noise. However, both in vivo and in silico, the number of noise sources is limited due to space and bandwidth constraints. Hence, neurons in large networks usually need to share noise sources. Here, we show that the resulting shared-noise correlations can significantly impair the performance of stochastic network models. We further demonstrate that this problem can be overcome by using deterministic recurrent neural networks as sources of stochasticity, exploiting the decorrelating effect of inhibitory feedback. Consequently, even a single recurrent network of a few hundred neurons can serve as a natural noise source for large ensembles of functional networks, each comprising thousands of units. We test the proposed framework for a diverse set of networks with different dimensionalities and entropies. A network reproducing handwritten digits with distinct predefined frequencies demonstrates the practical relevance. Finally, we show that the same design transfers to functional networks of spiking neurons.
  • Spiking networks that perform probabilistic inference have been proposed both as models of cortical computation and as candidates for solving problems in machine learning. However, the evidence for spike-based computation being in any way superior to non-spiking alternatives remains scarce. We propose that short-term plasticity can provide spiking networks with distinct computational advantages compared to their classical counterparts. In this work, we use networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons that are trained to perform both discriminative and generative tasks in their forward and backward information processing paths, respectively. During training, the energy landscape associated with their dynamics becomes highly diverse, with deep attractor basins separated by high barriers. Classical algorithms solve this problem by employing various tempering techniques, which are both computationally demanding and require global state updates. We demonstrate how similar results can be achieved in spiking networks endowed with local short-term synaptic plasticity. Additionally, we discuss how these networks can even outperform tempering-based approaches when the training data is imbalanced. We thereby show how biologically inspired, local, spike-triggered synaptic dynamics based simply on a limited pool of synaptic resources can allow spiking networks to outperform their non-spiking relatives.
  • A steadily increasing body of evidence suggests that the brain performs probabilistic inference to interpret and respond to sensory input and that trial-to-trial variability in neural activity plays an important role. The neural sampling hypothesis interprets stochastic neural activity as sampling from an underlying probability distribution and has been shown to be compatible with biologically observed firing patterns. In many studies, uncorrelated noise is used as a source of stochasticity, discounting the fact that cortical neurons may share a significant portion of their presynaptic partners, which impacts their computation. This is relevant in biology and for implementations of neural networks where bandwidth constraints limit the amount of independent noise. When receiving correlated noise, the resulting correlations cannot be directly countered by changes in synaptic weights $W$. We show that this is contingent on the chosen coding: when changing the state space from $z\in\{0,1\}$ to $z'\in\{-1,1\}$, correlated noise has the exact same effect as changes in $W'$. The translation of the problem to the $\{-1,1\}$ space allows to find a weight configuration that compensates for the induced correlations. For an artificial embedding of sampling networks, this allows a straightforward transfer between platforms with different bandwidth constraints. The existence of the mapping is important for learning. Since in the $\{-1,1\}$-coding the correlated noise can be compensated by parameter changes and the probability distribution can be kept invariant when changing the coding, the distribution will be found in the $\{0,1\}$-coding as well during learning, as demonstrated in simulations. Conclusively, sampling spiking networks are impervious to noise correlations when trained. If such computation happens in cortex, network plasticity does not need to take account of shared noise inputs.
  • Despite being originally inspired by the central nervous system, artificial neural networks have diverged from their biological archetypes as they have been remodeled to fit particular tasks. In this paper, we review several possibilites to reverse map these architectures to biologically more realistic spiking networks with the aim of emulating them on fast, low-power neuromorphic hardware. Since many of these devices employ analog components, which cannot be perfectly controlled, finding ways to compensate for the resulting effects represents a key challenge. Here, we discuss three different strategies to address this problem: the addition of auxiliary network components for stabilizing activity, the utilization of inherently robust architectures and a training method for hardware-emulated networks that functions without perfect knowledge of the system's dynamics and parameters. For all three scenarios, we corroborate our theoretical considerations with experimental results on accelerated analog neuromorphic platforms.
  • In many stochastic dynamical systems, ordinary chaotic behavior is preceded by a full-dimensional phase that exhibits 1/f-type power-spectra and/or scale-free statistics of (anti)instantons such as neuroavalanches, earthquakes, etc. In contrast with the phenomenological concept of self-organized criticality, the recently found approximation-free supersymmetric theory of stochastics (STS) identifies this phase as the noise-induced chaos (N-phase), i.e., the phase where the topological supersymmetry pertaining to all stochastic dynamical systems is broken spontaneously by the condensation of the noise-induced (anti-)instantons. Here, we support this picture in the context of neurodynamics. We study a 1D chain of neuron-like elements and find that the dynamics in the N-phase is indeed featured by positive stochastic Lyapunov exponents and dominated by (anti)instantonic processes of (creation)annihilation of kinks and antikinks, which can be viewed as predecessors of boundaries of neuroavalanches. We also construct the phase diagram of emulated stochastic neurodynamics on Spikey neuromorphic hardware and demonstrate that the width of the N-phase vanishes in the deterministic limit in accordance with STS. As a first result of the application of STS to neurodynamics comes the conclusion that a conscious brain can reside only in the N-phase.
  • This paper presents an extension of the BrainScaleS accelerated analog neuromorphic hardware model. The scalable neuromorphic architecture is extended by the support for multi-compartment models and non-linear dendrites. These features are part of a \SI{65}{\nano\meter} prototype ASIC. It allows to emulate different spike types observed in cortical pyramidal neurons: NMDA plateau potentials, calcium and sodium spikes. By replicating some of the structures of these cells, they can be configured to perform coincidence detection within a single neuron. Built-in plasticity mechanisms can modify not only the synaptic weights, but also the dendritic synaptic composition to efficiently train large multi-compartment neurons. Transistor-level simulations demonstrate the functionality of the analog implementation and illustrate analogies to biological measurements.
  • How spiking networks are able to perform probabilistic inference is an intriguing question, not only for understanding information processing in the brain, but also for transferring these computational principles to neuromorphic silicon circuits. A number of computationally powerful spiking network models have been proposed, but most of them have only been tested, under ideal conditions, in software simulations. Any implementation in an analog, physical system, be it in vivo or in silico, will generally lead to distorted dynamics due to the physical properties of the underlying substrate. In this paper, we discuss several such distortive effects that are difficult or impossible to remove by classical calibration routines or parameter training. We then argue that hierarchical networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons can offer the required robustness for physical implementation and demonstrate this with both software simulations and emulation on an accelerated analog neuromorphic device.
  • Neuronal firing activities have attracted a lot of attention since a large population of spatiotemporal patterns in the brain is the basis for adaptive behavior and can also reveal the signs for various neurological disorders including Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, epilepsy and others. Here, we study the dynamics of a simple neuronal network using different sets of settings on a neuromorphic chip. We observed three different types of collective neuronal firing activities, which agree with the clinical data taken from the brain. We constructed a brain phase diagram and showed that within the weak noise region, the brain is operating in an expected noise-induced phase (N-phase) rather than at a so-called self-organized critical boundary. The significance of this study is twofold: first, the deviation of neuronal activities from the normal brain could be symptomatic of diseases of the central nervous system, thus paving the way for new diagnostics and treatments; second, the normal brain states in the N-phase are optimal for computation and information processing. The latter may provide a way to establish powerful new computing paradigm using collective behavior of networks of spiking neurons.
  • Emulating spiking neural networks on analog neuromorphic hardware offers several advantages over simulating them on conventional computers, particularly in terms of speed and energy consumption. However, this usually comes at the cost of reduced control over the dynamics of the emulated networks. In this paper, we demonstrate how iterative training of a hardware-emulated network can compensate for anomalies induced by the analog substrate. We first convert a deep neural network trained in software to a spiking network on the BrainScaleS wafer-scale neuromorphic system, thereby enabling an acceleration factor of 10 000 compared to the biological time domain. This mapping is followed by the in-the-loop training, where in each training step, the network activity is first recorded in hardware and then used to compute the parameter updates in software via backpropagation. An essential finding is that the parameter updates do not have to be precise, but only need to approximately follow the correct gradient, which simplifies the computation of updates. Using this approach, after only several tens of iterations, the spiking network shows an accuracy close to the ideal software-emulated prototype. The presented techniques show that deep spiking networks emulated on analog neuromorphic devices can attain good computational performance despite the inherent variations of the analog substrate.
  • The highly variable dynamics of neocortical circuits observed in vivo have been hypothesized to represent a signature of ongoing stochastic inference but stand in apparent contrast to the deterministic response of neurons measured in vitro. Based on a propagation of the membrane autocorrelation across spike bursts, we provide an analytical derivation of the neural activation function that holds for a large parameter space, including the high-conductance state. On this basis, we show how an ensemble of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons with conductance-based synapses embedded in a spiking environment can attain the correct firing statistics for sampling from a well-defined target distribution. For recurrent networks, we examine convergence toward stationarity in computer simulations and demonstrate sample-based Bayesian inference in a mixed graphical model. This points to a new computational role of high-conductance states and establishes a rigorous link between deterministic neuron models and functional stochastic dynamics on the network level.
  • We present results from a new approach to learning and plasticity in neuromorphic hardware systems: to enable flexibility in implementable learning mechanisms while keeping high efficiency associated with neuromorphic implementations, we combine a general-purpose processor with full-custom analog elements. This processor is operating in parallel with a fully parallel neuromorphic system consisting of an array of synapses connected to analog, continuous time neuron circuits. Novel analog correlation sensor circuits process spike events for each synapse in parallel and in real-time. The processor uses this pre-processing to compute new weights possibly using additional information following its program. Therefore, learning rules can be defined in software giving a large degree of flexibility. Synapses realize correlation detection geared towards Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP) as central computational primitive in the analog domain. Operating at a speed-up factor of 1000 compared to biological time-scale, we measure time-constants from tens to hundreds of micro-seconds. We analyze variability across multiple chips and demonstrate learning using a multiplicative STDP rule. We conclude, that the presented approach will enable flexible and efficient learning as a platform for neuroscientific research and technological applications.
  • High-level brain function such as memory, classification or reasoning can be realized by means of recurrent networks of simplified model neurons. Analog neuromorphic hardware constitutes a fast and energy efficient substrate for the implementation of such neural computing architectures in technical applications and neuroscientific research. The functional performance of neural networks is often critically dependent on the level of correlations in the neural activity. In finite networks, correlations are typically inevitable due to shared presynaptic input. Recent theoretical studies have shown that inhibitory feedback, abundant in biological neural networks, can actively suppress these shared-input correlations and thereby enable neurons to fire nearly independently. For networks of spiking neurons, the decorrelating effect of inhibitory feedback has so far been explicitly demonstrated only for homogeneous networks of neurons with linear sub-threshold dynamics. Theory, however, suggests that the effect is a general phenomenon, present in any system with sufficient inhibitory feedback, irrespective of the details of the network structure or the neuronal and synaptic properties. Here, we investigate the effect of network heterogeneity on correlations in sparse, random networks of inhibitory neurons with non-linear, conductance-based synapses. Emulations of these networks on the analog neuromorphic hardware system Spikey allow us to test the efficiency of decorrelation by inhibitory feedback in the presence of hardware-specific heterogeneities. The configurability of the hardware substrate enables us to modulate the extent of heterogeneity in a systematic manner. We selectively study the effects of shared input and recurrent connections on correlations in membrane potentials and spike trains. Our results confirm ...
  • The apparent stochasticity of in-vivo neural circuits has long been hypothesized to represent a signature of ongoing stochastic inference in the brain. More recently, a theoretical framework for neural sampling has been proposed, which explains how sample-based inference can be performed by networks of spiking neurons. One particular requirement of this approach is that the neural response function closely follows a logistic curve. Analytical approaches to calculating neural response functions have been the subject of many theoretical studies. In order to make the problem tractable, particular assumptions regarding the neural or synaptic parameters are usually made. However, biologically significant activity regimes exist which are not covered by these approaches: Under strong synaptic bombardment, as is often the case in cortex, the neuron is shifted into a high-conductance state (HCS) characterized by a small membrane time constant. In this regime, synaptic time constants and refractory periods dominate membrane dynamics. The core idea of our approach is to separately consider two different "modes" of spiking dynamics: burst spiking and transient quiescence, in which the neuron does not spike for longer periods. We treat the former by propagating the PDF of the effective membrane potential from spike to spike within a burst, while using a diffusion approximation for the latter. We find that our prediction of the neural response function closely matches simulation data. Moreover, in the HCS scenario, we show that the neural response function becomes symmetric and can be well approximated by a logistic function, thereby providing the correct dynamics in order to perform neural sampling. We hereby provide not only a normative framework for Bayesian inference in cortex, but also powerful applications of low-power, accelerated neuromorphic systems to relevant machine learning tasks.
  • The means by which cortical neural networks are able to efficiently solve inference problems remains an open question in computational neuroscience. Recently, abstract models of Bayesian computation in neural circuits have been proposed, but they lack a mechanistic interpretation at the single-cell level. In this article, we describe a complete theoretical framework for building networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons that can sample from arbitrary probability distributions over binary random variables. We test our framework for a model inference task based on a psychophysical phenomenon (the Knill-Kersten optical illusion) and further assess its performance when applied to randomly generated distributions. As the local computations performed by the network strongly depend on the interaction between neurons, we compare several types of couplings mediated by either single synapses or interneuron chains. Due to its robustness to substrate imperfections such as parameter noise and background noise correlations, our model is particularly interesting for implementation on novel, neuro-inspired computing architectures, which can thereby serve as a fast, low-power substrate for solving real-world inference problems.
  • Advancing the size and complexity of neural network models leads to an ever increasing demand for computational resources for their simulation. Neuromorphic devices offer a number of advantages over conventional computing architectures, such as high emulation speed or low power consumption, but this usually comes at the price of reduced configurability and precision. In this article, we investigate the consequences of several such factors that are common to neuromorphic devices, more specifically limited hardware resources, limited parameter configurability and parameter variations. Our final aim is to provide an array of methods for coping with such inevitable distortion mechanisms. As a platform for testing our proposed strategies, we use an executable system specification (ESS) of the BrainScaleS neuromorphic system, which has been designed as a universal emulation back-end for neuroscientific modeling. We address the most essential limitations of this device in detail and study their effects on three prototypical benchmark network models within a well-defined, systematic workflow. For each network model, we start by defining quantifiable functionality measures by which we then assess the effects of typical hardware-specific distortion mechanisms, both in idealized software simulations and on the ESS. For those effects that cause unacceptable deviations from the original network dynamics, we suggest generic compensation mechanisms and demonstrate their effectiveness. Both the suggested workflow and the investigated compensation mechanisms are largely back-end independent and do not require additional hardware configurability beyond the one required to emulate the benchmark networks in the first place. We hereby provide a generic methodological environment for configurable neuromorphic devices that are targeted at emulating large-scale, functional neural networks.
  • Large-scale neuromorphic hardware systems typically bear the trade-off between detail level and required chip resources. Especially when implementing spike-timing-dependent plasticity, reduction in resources leads to limitations as compared to floating point precision. By design, a natural modification that saves resources would be reducing synaptic weight resolution. In this study, we give an estimate for the impact of synaptic weight discretization on different levels, ranging from random walks of individual weights to computer simulations of spiking neural networks. The FACETS wafer-scale hardware system offers a 4-bit resolution of synaptic weights, which is shown to be sufficient within the scope of our network benchmark. Our findings indicate that increasing the resolution may not even be useful in light of further restrictions of customized mixed-signal synapses. In addition, variations due to production imperfections are investigated and shown to be uncritical in the context of the presented study. Our results represent a general framework for setting up and configuring hardware-constrained synapses. We suggest how weight discretization could be considered for other backends dedicated to large-scale simulations. Thus, our proposition of a good hardware verification practice may rise synergy effects between hardware developers and neuroscientists.
  • The seemingly stochastic transient dynamics of neocortical circuits observed in vivo have been hypothesized to represent a signature of ongoing stochastic inference. In vitro neurons, on the other hand, exhibit a highly deterministic response to various types of stimulation. We show that an ensemble of deterministic leaky integrate-and-fire neurons embedded in a spiking noisy environment can attain the correct firing statistics in order to sample from a well-defined target distribution. We provide an analytical derivation of the activation function on the single cell level; for recurrent networks, we examine convergence towards stationarity in computer simulations and demonstrate sample-based Bayesian inference in a mixed graphical model. This establishes a rigorous link between deterministic neuron models and functional stochastic dynamics on the network level.
  • Temporal coding is one approach to representing information in spiking neural networks. An example of its application is the location of sounds by barn owls that requires especially precise temporal coding. Dependent upon the azimuthal angle, the arrival times of sound signals are shifted between both ears. In order to deter- mine these interaural time differences, the phase difference of the signals is measured. We implemented this biologically inspired network on a neuromorphic hardware system and demonstrate spike-timing dependent plasticity on an analog, highly accelerated hardware substrate. Our neuromorphic implementation enables the resolution of time differences of less than 50 ns. On-chip Hebbian learning mechanisms select inputs from a pool of neurons which code for the same sound frequency. Hence, noise caused by different synaptic delays across these inputs is reduced. Furthermore, learning compensates for variations on neuronal and synaptic parameters caused by device mismatch intrinsic to the neuromorphic substrate.
  • In this study, we propose and analyze in simulations a new, highly flexible method of implementing synaptic plasticity in a wafer-scale, accelerated neuromorphic hardware system. The study focuses on globally modulated STDP, as a special use-case of this method. Flexibility is achieved by embedding a general-purpose processor dedicated to plasticity into the wafer. To evaluate the suitability of the proposed system, we use a reward modulated STDP rule in a spike train learning task. A single layer of neurons is trained to fire at specific points in time with only the reward as feedback. This model is simulated to measure its performance, i.e. the increase in received reward after learning. Using this performance as baseline, we then simulate the model with various constraints imposed by the proposed implementation and compare the performance. The simulated constraints include discretized synaptic weights, a restricted interface between analog synapses and embedded processor, and mismatch of analog circuits. We find that probabilistic updates can increase the performance of low-resolution weights, a simple interface between analog synapses and processor is sufficient for learning, and performance is insensitive to mismatch. Further, we consider communication latency between wafer and the conventional control computer system that is simulating the environment. This latency increases the delay, with which the reward is sent to the embedded processor. Because of the time continuous operation of the analog synapses, delay can cause a deviation of the updates as compared to the not delayed situation. We find that for highly accelerated systems latency has to be kept to a minimum. This study demonstrates the suitability of the proposed implementation to emulate the selected reward modulated STDP learning rule.
  • In this study, we present a highly configurable neuromorphic computing substrate and use it for emulating several types of neural networks. At the heart of this system lies a mixed-signal chip, with analog implementations of neurons and synapses and digital transmission of action potentials. Major advantages of this emulation device, which has been explicitly designed as a universal neural network emulator, are its inherent parallelism and high acceleration factor compared to conventional computers. Its configurability allows the realization of almost arbitrary network topologies and the use of widely varied neuronal and synaptic parameters. Fixed-pattern noise inherent to analog circuitry is reduced by calibration routines. An integrated development environment allows neuroscientists to operate the device without any prior knowledge of neuromorphic circuit design. As a showcase for the capabilities of the system, we describe the successful emulation of six different neural networks which cover a broad spectrum of both structure and functionality.
  • In this paper we present a methodological framework that meets novel requirements emerging from upcoming types of accelerated and highly configurable neuromorphic hardware systems. We describe in detail a device with 45 million programmable and dynamic synapses that is currently under development, and we sketch the conceptual challenges that arise from taking this platform into operation. More specifically, we aim at the establishment of this neuromorphic system as a flexible and neuroscientifically valuable modeling tool that can be used by non-hardware-experts. We consider various functional aspects to be crucial for this purpose, and we introduce a consistent workflow with detailed descriptions of all involved modules that implement the suggested steps: The integration of the hardware interface into the simulator-independent model description language PyNN; a fully automated translation between the PyNN domain and appropriate hardware configurations; an executable specification of the future neuromorphic system that can be seamlessly integrated into this biology-to-hardware mapping process as a test bench for all software layers and possible hardware design modifications; an evaluation scheme that deploys models from a dedicated benchmark library, compares the results generated by virtual or prototype hardware devices with reference software simulations and analyzes the differences. The integration of these components into one hardware-software workflow provides an ecosystem for ongoing preparative studies that support the hardware design process and represents the basis for the maturity of the model-to-hardware mapping software. The functionality and flexibility of the latter is proven with a variety of experimental results.