• We introduce the concept of optical control of the fluorescence yield of CdSe quantum dots through plasmon-induced structural changes in random semicontinuous nanostructured gold films. We demonstrate that the wavelength- and polarization dependent coupling between quantum dots and the semicontinuous films, and thus the fluorescent emission spectrum, can be controlled and significantly increased through the optical extinction of a selective band of eigenmodes in the films. This optical method of effecting controlled changes in the metal nanostructure allows for versatile functionality in a single sample and opens a pathway to in situ control over the fluorescence spectrum.
  • The configuration and evolution of coexisting mesoscopic domains with contrasting material properties are critical in creating novel functionality through emergent physical properties. However, current approaches that map the domain structure involve either spatially resolved but protracted scanning probe experiments without real time information on the domain evolution, or time resolved spectroscopic experiments lacking domain-scale spatial resolution. We demonstrate an elegant experimental technique that bridges these local and global methods, giving access to mesoscale information on domain formation and evolution at time scales orders of magnitude faster than current spatially resolved approaches. Our straightforward analysis of laser speckle patterns across the first order phase transition of VO$_2$ can be generalized to other systems with large scale phase separation and has potential as a powerful method with both spatial and temporal resolution to study phase separation in complex materials.
  • Electromechanical coupling is ubiquitous in biological systems with examples ranging from simple piezoelectricity in calcified and connective tissues to voltage-gated ion channels, energy storage in mitochondria, and electromechanical activity in cardiac myocytes and outer hair cell stereocilia. Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has originally emerged as a technique to study electromechanical phenomena in ferroelectric materials, and in recent years, has been employed to study a broad range of non-ferroelectric polar materials, including piezoelectric biomaterials. At the same time, the technique has been extended from ambient to liquid imaging on model ferroelectric systems. Here, we present results on local electromechanical probing of several model cellular and biomolecular systems, including insulin and lysozyme amyloid fibrils, breast adenocarcinoma cells, and bacteriorhodopsin in a liquid environment. The specific features of SPM operation in liquid are delineated and bottlenecks on the route towards nanometer-resolution electromechanical imaging of biological systems are identified.