• We present the Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) catalog of transiting exoplanets based on searching four years of Kepler time series photometry (Data Release 25, Q1-Q17). The catalog contains 8054 KOIs of which 4034 are planet candidates with periods between 0.25 and 632 days. Of these candidates, 219 are new and include two in multi-planet systems (KOI-82.06 and KOI-2926.05), and ten high-reliability, terrestrial-size, habitable zone candidates. This catalog was created using a tool called the Robovetter which automatically vets the DR25 Threshold Crossing Events (TCEs, Twicken et al. 2016). The Robovetter also vetted simulated data sets and measured how well it was able to separate TCEs caused by noise from those caused by low signal-to-noise transits. We discusses the Robovetter and the metrics it uses to sort TCEs. For orbital periods less than 100 days the Robovetter completeness (the fraction of simulated transits that are determined to be planet candidates) across all observed stars is greater than 85%. For the same period range, the catalog reliability (the fraction of candidates that are not due to instrumental or stellar noise) is greater than 98%. However, for low signal-to-noise candidates between 200 and 500 days around FGK dwarf stars, the Robovetter is 76.7% complete and the catalog is 50.5% reliable. The KOI catalog, the transit fits and all of the simulated data used to characterize this catalog are available at the NASA Exoplanet Archive.
  • We present a way of searching for non-transiting exoplanets with dusty tails. In the transiting case, the extinction by dust during the transit removes more light from the beam than is scattered into it. Thus, the forward scattering component of the light is best seen either just prior to ingress, or just after egress, but with reduced amplitude over the larger peak that is obscured by the transit. This picture suggests that it should be equally productive to search for positive-going peaks in the flux from non-transiting exoplanets with dusty tails. We discuss what amplitudes are expected for different orbital inclination angles. The signature of such objects should be distinct from normal transits, starspots, and most - but not all - types of stellar pulsations.
  • The mechanical properties of a neutron star crust, such as breaking strain and shear modulus, have implications for the detection of gravitational waves from a neutron star as well as bursts from Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters (SGRs). These properties are calculated here for three different crustal compositions for a non-accreting neutron star that results from three different cooling histories, as well as for a pure iron crust. A simple shear is simulated using molecular dynamics to the crustal compositions by deforming the simulation box. The breaking strain and shear modulus are found to be similar in the four cases, with a breaking strain of ~0.1 and a shear modulus of ~10^{30} dyne cm^{-2} at a density of \rho = 10^{14} g cm^{-3} for simulations with an initially perfect BCC lattice. With these crustal properties and the observed properties of {PSR J2124-3358} the predicted strain amplitude of gravitational waves for a maximally deformed crust is found to be greater than the observational upper limits from LIGO. This suggests that the neutron star crust in this case may not be maximally deformed or it may not have a perfect BCC lattice structure. The implications of the calculated crustal properties of bursts from SGRs are also explored. The mechanical properties found for a perfect BCC lattice structure find that crustal events alone can not be ruled out for triggering the energy in SGR bursts.
  • We show that kicks generated by topological currents may be responsible for the large velocities seen in a number of pulsars. The majority of the kick builds up within the first second of the star's birth and generates a force about two orders of magnitude larger than a neutrino kick in the same temperature and magnetic field regime. Because of the nature of the topological currents the star's cooling is not affected until it reaches 10^9 K; thereafter the current replaces neutrino emission as the dominant cooling process. A requirement for the kick to occur is a suitably thin crust on the star; this leads us to speculate that pulsars with large kicks are quark stars and those with small kicks are neutron stars. If true this would be an elegant way to distinguish quark stars from neutron stars.
  • We have investigated the crustal properties of neutron stars without fallback accretion. We have calculated the chemical evolution of the neutron star crust in three different cases (a modified Urca process without the thermal influence of a crust, a thick crust, and a direct Urca process with a thin crust) in order to determine the detailed composition of the envelope and atmosphere as the nuclear reactions freeze out. Using a nuclear reaction network up to technetium, we calculate the distribution of nuclei at various depths of the neutron star. The nuclear reactions quench when the cooling timescale is shorter than the inverse of the reaction rate. Trace light elements among the calculated isotopes may have enough time to float to the surface before the layer crystallizes and form the atmosphere or envelope of the neutron star. The composition of the neutron-star envelope determines the total photon flux from the surface, and the composition of the atmosphere determines the emergent spectrum. Our calculations using each of the three cooling models indicate that without accretion of fallback the neutron star atmospheres are dependent on the assumed cooling process of the neutron star. Each of the cooling methods have different elements composing the atmosphere: for the modified Urca process the atmosphere is $^{28}$Si, the thick crust has an atmosphere of $^{50}$Cr, and the thin crust has an atmosphere of $^{40}$Ca. In all three cases the atmospheres are composed of elements which are lighter then iron.
  • (abridged) The high radio-flux brightness temperature of the recently discovered class of sources known as Rotating RAdio Transients (RRATs) motivates detailed study in the X-ray band. We describe analyses of historical X-ray data, searching for X-ray phenomena (sources, behaviors), finding no sources or behaviors which may unequivocally be associated with RRAT J1911+00. We put forward a candidate X-ray counterpart to RRAT J1911+00, discovered in a Chandra observation in Feb 2001, which fades by a factor >5 prior to April 2004. The X-ray flux and optical (F_X/F_R>12) and near infra-red (F_X/F_J>35) limits, as well as the X-ray flux itself, are consistent with an AGN origin, unrelated to RRAT J1911+00. Searches for msec X-ray bursts found no evidence for such a signal, and we place the first observational upper-limit on the X-ray to radio flux ratio of RRAT bursts: F_X/F_{radio} <6e-11 ergs cm-2 s-1 mJy-1. The upper-limit on the X-ray burst flux (corresponding to <2.2e37 (d/3.3 kpc)^2 erg s-1, 2-10 keV) requires a limit on the spectral energy density power-law slope of \alpha<-0.3 between the radio and X-ray bands. We place a limit on the time-average X-ray burst luminosity, associated with radio bursts, of < 3.4e30 (d/3.3 kpc)^2 erg s-1.