• The primary goal of Galactic archaeology is to learn about the origin of the Milky Way from the detailed chemistry and kinematics of millions of stars. Wide-field multi-fibre spectrographs are increasingly used to obtain spectral information for huge samples of stars. Some surveys (e.g. GALAH) are attempting to measure up to 30 separate elements per star. Stellar abundance spectroscopy is a subtle art that requires a very high degree of spectral uniformity across each of the fibres. However wide-field spectrographs are notoriously non-uniform due to the fast output optics necessary to image many fibre outputs onto the detector. We show that precise spectroscopy is possible with such instruments across all fibres by employing a photonic comb -- a device that produces uniformly spaced spots of light on the CCD to precisely map complex aberrations. Aberrations are parametrized by a set of orthogonal moments with $\sim100$ independent parameters. We then reproduce the observed image by convolving high resolution spectral templates with measured aberrations as opposed to extracting the spectra from the observed image. Such a forward modeling approach also trivializes some spectroscopic reduction problems like fibre cross-talk, and reliably extracts spectra with a resolution $\sim2.3$ times above the nominal resolution of the instrument. Our rigorous treatment of optical aberrations also encourages a less conservative spectrograph design in the future.
  • Using GALAH survey data of nearby stars, we look at how structure in the planar (u,v) velocity distribution depends on metallicity and on viewing direction within the Galaxy. In nearby stars, with distance d < 1 kpc, the Hercules stream is most strongly seen in higher metallicity stars [Fe/H] > 0.2. The Hercules stream peak v value depends on viewed galactic longitude, which we interpret as due to the gap between the stellar stream and more circular orbits being associated with a specific angular momentum value of about 1640 km/s kpc. The association of the gap with a particular angular momentum value supports a bar resonant model for the Hercules stream. Moving groups previously identified in Hipparcos observations are easiest to see in stars nearer than 250 pc, and their visibility and peak velocities in the velocity distributions depends on both viewing direction (galactic longitude and hemisphere) and metallicity. We infer that there is fine structure in local velocity distributions that varies over distances of a few hundred pc in the Galaxy.
  • Accurate and precise radius estimates of transiting exoplanets are critical for understanding their compositions and formation mechanisms. To know the planet, we must know the host star in as much detail as possible. We present first results from the K2-HERMES project, which uses the HERMES multi-object spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope to obtain R$\sim$28,000 spectra of up to 360 stars in one exposure. This ongoing project aims to derive self-consistent spectroscopic parameters for about half of K2 target stars. We present complete stellar parameters and isochrone-derived masses and radii for 46 stars hosting 57 K2 candidate planets in Campaigns 1-3. Our revised host-star radii cast severe doubt on three candidate planets: EPIC\,201407812.01, EPIC\,203070421.01, and EPIC\,202843107.01, all of which now have inferred radii well in excess of the largest known inflated Jovian planets.
  • The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will provide high precision time-series photometry for millions of stars with at least a half-hour cadence. Of particular interest are the circular regions of 12-degree radius centered around the ecliptic poles that will be observed continuously for a full year. Spectroscopic stellar parameters are desirable to characterize and select suitable targets for TESS, whether they are focused on exploring exoplanets, stellar astrophysics, or Galactic archaeology. Here, we present spectroscopic stellar parameters ($T_{\rm eff}$, $\log g$, [Fe/H], $v \sin i$, $v_{\rm micro}$) for about 16,000 dwarf and subgiant stars in TESS' southern continuous viewing zone. For almost all the stars, we also present Bayesian estimates of stellar properties including distance, extinction, mass, radius, and age using theoretical isochrones. Stellar surface gravity and radius are made available for an additional set of roughly 8,500 red giants. All our target stars are in the range $10<V<13.1$. Among them, we identify and list 227 stars belonging to the Large Magellanic Cloud. The data were taken using the the High Efficiency and Resolution Multi-Element Spectrograph (HERMES, R $\sim 28,000$) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope as part of the TESS-HERMES survey. Comparing our results with the TESS Input Catalog (TIC) shows that the TIC is generally efficient in separating dwarfs and giants, but it has flagged more than hundred cool dwarfs ($T_{\rm eff}< 4800$ K) as giants, which ought to be high-priority targets for the exoplanet search. The catalog can be accessed via http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/tess-hermes/ , or at MAST via https://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/tess-hermes/ .
  • The technique of chemical tagging uses the elemental abundances of stellar atmospheres to `reconstruct' chemically homogeneous star clusters that have long since dispersed. The GALAH spectroscopic survey --which aims to observe one million stars using the Anglo-Australian Telescope -- allows us to measure up to 30 elements or dimensions in the stellar chemical abundance space, many of which are not independent. How to find clustering reliably in a noisy high-dimensional space is a difficult problem that remains largely unsolved. Here we explore t-distributed stochastic neighbour embedding (t-SNE) -- which identifies an optimal mapping of a high-dimensional space into fewer dimensions -- whilst conserving the original clustering information. Typically, the projection is made to a 2D space to aid recognition of clusters by eye. We show that this method is a reliable tool for chemical tagging because it can: (i) resolve clustering in chemical space alone, (ii) recover known open and globular clusters with high efficiency and low contamination, and (iii) relate field stars to known clusters. t-SNE also provides a useful visualization of a high-dimensional space. We demonstrate the method on a dataset of 13 abundances measured in the spectra of 187,000 stars by the GALAH survey. We recover 7 of the 9 observed clusters (6 globular and 3 open clusters) in chemical space with minimal contamination from field stars and low numbers of outliers. With chemical tagging, we also identify two Pleiades supercluster members (which we confirm kinematically), one as far as 6$^\circ$ -- one tidal radius away from the cluster centre.
  • We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12, which is the largest available white dwarf catalog to date, to study the evolution of the kinematical properties of the population of white dwarfs in the Galactic disc. We derive masses, ages, photometric distances and radial velocities for all white dwarfs with hydrogen-rich atmospheres. For those stars for which proper motions from the USNO-B1 catalog are available the true three-dimensional components of the stellar space velocity are obtained. This subset of the original sample comprises 20,247 objects, making it the largest sample of white dwarfs with measured three-dimensional velocities. Furthermore, the volume probed by our sample is large, allowing us to obtain relevant kinematical information. In particular, our sample extends from a Galactocentric radial distance $R_{\rm G}=7.8$~kpc to 9.3~kpc, and vertical distances from the Galactic plane ranging from $Z=-0.5$~kpc to 0.5~kpc. We examine the mean components of the stellar three-dimensional velocities, as well as their dispersions with respect to the Galactocentric and vertical distances. We confirm the existence of a mean Galactocentric radial velocity gradient, $\partial\langle V_{\rm R}\rangle/\partial R_{\rm G}=-3\pm5$~km~s$^{-1}$~kpc$^{-1}$. We also confirm North-South differences in $\langle V_{\rm z}\rangle$. Specifically, we find that white dwarfs with $Z>0$ (in the North Galactic hemisphere) have $\langle V_{\rm z}\rangle<0$, while the reverse is true for white dwarfs with $Z<0$. The age-velocity dispersion relation derived from the present sample indicates that the Galactic population of white dwarfs may have experienced an additional source of heating, which adds to the secular evolution of the Galactic disc.
  • This paper presents the first major data release and survey description for the ANU WiFeS SuperNovA Program (AWSNAP). AWSNAP is an ongoing supernova spectroscopy campaign utilising the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) on the Australian National University (ANU) 2.3m telescope. The first and primary data release of this program (AWSNAP-DR1) releases 357 spectra of 175 unique objects collected over 82 equivalent full nights of observing from July 2012 to August 2015. These spectra have been made publicly available via the WISeREP supernova spectroscopy repository. We analyse the AWSNAP sample of Type Ia supernova spectra, including measurements of narrow sodium absorption features afforded by the high spectral resolution of the WiFeS instrument. In some cases we were able to use the integral-field nature of the WiFeS instrument to measure the rotation velocity of the SN host galaxy near the SN location in order to obtain precision sodium absorption velocities. We also present an extensive time series of SN 2012dn, including a near-nebular spectrum which both confirms its "super-Chandrasekhar" status and enables measurement of the sub-solar host metallicity at the SN site.
  • Alan McConnachie, Carine Babusiaux, Michael Balogh, Simon Driver, Pat Côté, Helene Courtois, Luke Davies, Laura Ferrarese, Sarah Gallagher, Rodrigo Ibata, Nicolas Martin, Aaron Robotham, Kim Venn, Eva Villaver, Jo Bovy, Alessandro Boselli, Matthew Colless, Johan Comparat, Kelly Denny, Pierre-Alain Duc, Sara Ellison, Richard de Grijs, Mirian Fernandez-Lorenzo, Ken Freeman, Raja Guhathakurta, Patrick Hall, Andrew Hopkins, Mike Hudson, Andrew Johnson, Nick Kaiser, Jun Koda, Iraklis Konstantopoulos, George Koshy, Khee-Gan Lee, Adi Nusser, Anna Pancoast, Eric Peng, Celine Peroux, Patrick Petitjean, Christophe Pichon, Bianca Poggianti, Carlo Schmid, Prajval Shastri, Yue Shen, Chris Willot, Scott Croom, Rosine Lallement, Carlo Schimd, Dan Smith, Matthew Walker, Jon Willis, Alessandro Bosselli Matthew Colless, Aruna Goswami, Matt Jarvis, Eric Jullo, Jean-Paul Kneib, Iraklis Konstantopoloulous, Jeff Newman, Johan Richard, Firoza Sutaria, Edwar Taylor, Ludovic van Waerbeke, Giuseppina Battaglia, Pat Hall, Misha Haywood, Charli Sakari, Carlo Schmid, Arnaud Seibert, Sivarani Thirupathi, Yuting Wang, Yiping Wang, Ferdinand Babas, Steve Bauman, Elisabetta Caffau, Mary Beth Laychak, David Crampton, Daniel Devost, Nicolas Flagey, Zhanwen Han, Clare Higgs, Vanessa Hill, Kevin Ho, Sidik Isani, Shan Mignot, Rick Murowinski, Gajendra Pandey, Derrick Salmon, Arnaud Siebert, Doug Simons, Else Starkenburg, Kei Szeto, Brent Tully, Tom Vermeulen, Kanoa Withington, Nobuo Arimoto, Martin Asplund, Herve Aussel, Michele Bannister, Harish Bhatt, SS Bhargavi, John Blakeslee, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, James Bullock, Denis Burgarella, Tzu-Ching Chang, Andrew Cole, Jeff Cooke, Andrew Cooper, Paola Di Matteo, Ginevra Favole, Hector Flores, Bryan Gaensler, Peter Garnavich, Karoline Gilbert, Rosa Gonzalez-Delgado, Puragra Guhathakurta, Guenther Hasinger, Falk Herwig, Narae Hwang, Pascale Jablonka, Matthew Jarvis, Umanath Kamath, Lisa Kewley, Damien Le Borgne, Geraint Lewis, Robert Lupton, Sarah Martell, Mario Mateo, Olga Mena, David Nataf, Jeffrey Newman, Enrique Pérez, Francisco Prada, Mathieu Puech, Alejandra Recio-Blanco, Annie Robin, Will Saunders, Daniel Smith, C.S. Stalin, Charling Tao, Karun Thanjuvur, Laurence Tresse, Ludo van Waerbeke, Jian-Min Wang, David Yong, Gongbo Zhao, Patrick Boisse, James Bolton, Piercarlo Bonifacio, Francois Bouchy, Len Cowie, Katia Cunha, Magali Deleuil, Ernst de Mooij, Patrick Dufour, Sebastien Foucaud, Karl Glazebrook, John Hutchings, Chiaki Kobayashi, Rolf-Peter Kudritzki, Yang-Shyang Li, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Martin Makler, Norio Narita, Changbom Park, Ryan Ransom, Swara Ravindranath, Bacham Eswar Reddy, Marcin Sawicki, Luc Simard, Raghunathan Srianand, Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann, Keiichi Umetsu, Ting-Gui Wang, Jong-Hak Woo, Xue-Bing Wu
    May 31, 2016 astro-ph.GA, astro-ph.IM
    MSE is an 11.25m aperture observatory with a 1.5 square degree field of view that will be fully dedicated to multi-object spectroscopy. More than 3200 fibres will feed spectrographs operating at low (R ~ 2000 - 3500) and moderate (R ~ 6000) spectral resolution, and approximately 1000 fibers will feed spectrographs operating at high (R ~ 40000) resolution. MSE is designed to enable transformational science in areas as diverse as tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of thick disk and halo stars; connecting galaxies to their large scale structure; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars; next generation cosmological surveys using redshift space distortions and peculiar velocities. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, WFIRST, PLATO, and the SKA, and is designed to complement and go beyond the science goals of other planned and current spectroscopic capabilities like VISTA/4MOST, WHT/WEAVE, AAT/HERMES and Subaru/PFS. It is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT, and provides the missing link between wide field imaging and small field precision astronomy. MSE is optimized for high throughput, high signal-to-noise observations of the faintest sources in the Universe with high quality calibration and stability being ensured through the dedicated operational mode of the observatory. (abridged)
  • This is a brief rebuttal to arXiv:1502.03821, which claims to provide the first observational proof of dark matter interior to the solar circle. We point out that this result is not new, and can be traced back at least a quarter century.
  • We estimate the size and distribution of the parent populations for the 6 largest (at least 20 stars in the Solar neighborhood) chemical groups identified in the Chemical Tagging experiment by Mitschang et al.~2014. Stars in the abundance groups tend to lie near a boundary in angular momentum versus eccentricity space where the probability is highest for a star to be found in the Solar neighborhood and where orbits have apocenter approximately equal to the Sun's galactocentric radius. Assuming that the parent populations are uniformly distributed at all azimuthal angles in the Galaxy, we estimate that the parent populations of these abundance groups contain at least 200,000 members. The spread in angular momentum of the groups implies that the assumption of a uniform azimuthal distribution only fails for the two youngest groups and only for the highest angular momentum stars in them. The parent populations of three thin disk groups have narrow angular momentum distributions, but tails in the eccentricity and angular momentum distributions suggest that only a small fraction of stars have migrated and increased in eccentricity. In contrast, the parent populations of the thick disk groups exhibit both wide angular momentum and eccentricity distributions implying that both heating and radial migration has taken place.
  • We explore the kinematics and orbital properties of a sample of 323 very metal-poor stars in the halo system of the Milky Way, selected from the high-resolution spectroscopic follow-up studies of Aoki et al. and Yong et al. The combined sample contains a significant fraction of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars (22% or 29%, depending on whether a strict or relaxed criterion is applied for this definition). Barium abundances (or upper limits) are available for the great majority of the CEMP stars, allowing for their separation into the CEMP-$s$ and CEMP-no sub-classes. A new method to assign membership to the inner- and outer-halo populations of the Milky Way is developed, making use of the integrals of motion, and applied to determine the relative fractions of CEMP stars in these two sub-classes for each halo component. Although limited by small-number statistics, the data suggest that the inner halo of the Milky Way exhibits a somewhat higher relative number of CEMP-$s$ stars than CEMP-no stars (57% vs. 43%), while the outer halo possesses a clearly higher fraction of CEMP-no stars than CEMP-$s$ stars (70% vs. 30%). Although larger samples of CEMP stars with known Ba abundances are required, this result suggests that the dominant progenitors of CEMP stars in the two halo components were different; massive stars for the outer halo, and intermediate-mass stars in the case of the inner halo.
  • H{\alpha} observations centred on galaxies selected from the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS, Barnes et al. 2001) typically show one and sometimes two star-forming galaxies within the approximately 15-arcminute beam of the Parkes 64-m HI detections. In our Survey of Ionization in Neutral Gas Galaxies (SINGG, Meurer et al. 2006) we found fifteen cases of HIPASS sources containing four or more emission line galaxies (ELGs). We name these fields Choir groups. In the most extreme case we found a field with at least nine ELGs. In this paper we present a catalogue of Choir group members in the context of the wider SINGG sample. The dwarf galaxies in the Choir groups would not be individually detectable in HIPASS at the observed distances if they were isolated, but are detected in SINGG narrow-band imaging due to their membership of groups with sufficiently large total HI mass. The ELGs in these groups are similar to the wider SINGG sample in terms of size, H{\alpha} equivalent width, and surface brightness. Eight of these groups have two large spiral galaxies with several dwarf galaxies and may be thought of as morphological analogues of the Local Group. However, on average our groups are not significantly HI-deficient, suggesting that they are at an early stage of assembly, and more like the M81 group. The Choir groups are very compact at typically only 190 kpc in projected distance between the two brightest members. They are very similar to SINGG fields in terms of star formation efficiency (the ratio of star formation rate to HI mass; SFE), showing an increasing trend in SFE with stellar mass.
  • We explore the kinematics and orbital properties of a sample of red giants in the halo system of the Milky Way that are thought to have formed in globular clusters, based on their anomalously strong UV/blue CN bands. The orbital parameters of the CN-strong halo stars are compared to those of the inner- and outer-halo populations as described by Carollo et al., and to the orbital parameters of globular clusters with well-studied Galactic orbits. The CN-strong field stars and the globular clusters both exhibit kinematics and orbital properties similar to the inner-halo population, indicating that stripped or destroyed globular clusters could be a significant source of inner-halo field stars, and suggesting that both the CN-strong stars and the majority of globular clusters are primarily associated with this population.
  • We present tentative evidence for the existence of a dissolved star cluster at [Fe/H]=-2.7 in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We use the technique of chemical tagging to identify stars that are highly clustered in a multi-dimensional chemical abundance space (C-space). In a sample of six stars, three, possibly four stars are identified as potential cluster stars. The initial stellar mass of the parent cluster is estimated from two independent observations to M*,init=1.9^{+1.5}_{-0.9} (1.6^{+1.2}_{-0.8}) x 10^5 M_sol, assuming a Salpeter (Kroupa) initial mass function (IMF). If corroborated by follow-up spectroscopy, this star cluster is the most metal-poor system identified to date. Chemical signatures of remnant clusters in dwarf galaxies like Sextans provide us with a very powerful probe to the high-redshift Universe. From available observational data, we argue that the average star cluster mass in the majority of the newly discovered ultra-faint dwarf galaxies was notably lower than it is in the Galaxy today and possibly lower than in the more luminous, classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Furthermore, the mean cumulative metallicity function of the dwarf spheroidals falls below that of the ultra-faints, which increases with increasing metallicity as predicted from our stochastic chemical evolution model. These two findings, together with a possible difference in the <[Mg/Fe]> ratio suggest that the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy population, or a significant fraction thereof, and the dwarf spheroidal population, were formed in different environments and would thus be distinct in origin.
  • This review discusses the structure and evolution of the Milky Way, in the context of opportunities provided by asteroseismology of red giants. The review is structured according to the main Galactic components: the thin disk, thick disk, stellar halo, and the Galactic bar/bulge. The review concludes with an overview of Galactic archaeology and chemical tagging, and a brief account of the upcoming HERMES survey with the AAT.
  • Using a counter-dispersed slitless spectroscopy technique, we detect and measure the line-of-sight velocities of 187 planetary nebulae (PNe) around one of the nearest cD galaxies, NGC 1399, with FORS1 on the VLT. We describe the method for identifying and classifying the emission-line sources and the procedure for computing their J2000 coordinates and velocities. The number of PN detections and the errors in the velocity measurements (37 km/s indicate that this technique is comparable to other methods, such as that described by Teodorescu et al. (2005). We present the spatial distribution of the PNe and a basic analysis of their velocities. The PN two-dimensional velocity field shows marginal rotation consistent with other studies. We also find a low-velocity substructure in the halo and a flatter velocity-dispersion profile compared to previous observations that extends to ~400 arcsec. The detection of a low-velocity subcomponent underscores the importance of discrete velocity tracers for the detection of un-mixed components. The new velocity-dispersion profile is in good agreement with revised velocity dispersions for the red globular clusters in NGC 1399, using the data of Schuberth et al. (2009). The outer parts of this profile are consistent with one of the dynamical models of Kronawitter et al. (2000), which corresponds to a circular velocity of ~340 km/s and a rescaled B-band mass-to-light ratio of ~20 at 7' radius. These measurements trace the kinematics of the outer halo and disentangle the heterogenous populations in the Fornax Cluster core. The new data set the stage for a revised dynamical model of the outer halo of NGC 1399.
  • The Galactic disk retains a vast amount of information about how it came to be, and how it evolved over cosmic time. However, we know very little about the secular processes associated with disk evolution. One major uncertainty is the extent to which stars migrate radially through the disk, thereby washing out signatures of their past (e.g. birth sites). Recent theoretical work finds that such "blurring" of the disk can be important if spiral arms are transient phenomena. Here we describe an experiment to determine the importance of diffusion from the Solar circle with cosmic time. Consider a star cluster that has been placed into a differentially rotating, stellar fluid. We show that all clusters up to ~10^4 solar masses, and a significant fraction of those up to ~10^5 solar masses, are expected to be chemically homogeneous, and that clusters of this size can be assigned a unique "chemical tag" by measuring the abundances of <~10 independent element groups, with better age and orbit determinations allowing fewer abundance measurements. The star cluster therefore acts like a "tracer dye", and the present-day distribution of its stars provides a strong constraint on the rate of radial diffusion or migration in the Galactic disk. Sellwood & Binney have argued for strong radial transport driven by transient spiral perturbations: in principle, we could measure the strength of this migration directly.
  • We present Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of a galaxy-sized intergalactic HI cloud (the Vela Cloud) in the NGC 3256 galaxy group. The group contains the prominent merging galaxy NGC 3256, which is surrounded by a number of HI fragments, the tidally disturbed galaxy NGC 3263, and several other peculiar galaxies. The Vela Cloud, with an HI mass of 3-5 * 10**9 solar masses, resides southeast of NGC 3256 and west of NGC 3263, within an area of 9' x 16' (100 kpc x 175 kpc for an adopted distance of 38 Mpc). In our ATCA data the Vela Cloud appears as 3 diffuse components and contains 4 density enhancements. The Vela Cloud's properties, together with its group environment, suggest that it has a tidal origin. Each density enhancement contains ~10**8 solar masses of HI gas which is sufficient material for the formation of globular cluster progenitors. However, if we represent the enhancements as Bonnor-Ebert spheres, then the pressure of the surrounding HI would need to increase by at least a factor of 6 in order to cause the collapse of an enhancement. Thus we do not expect them to form massive bound stellar systems like super star clusters or tidal dwarf galaxies. Since the HI density enhancements have some properties in common with High Velocity Clouds, we explore whether they may evolve to be identified with these starless clouds instead.
  • The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) is a systematic survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D<4 Mpc). The survey volume encompasses 69 galaxies in diverse environments, including close pairs, small & large groups, filaments, and truly isolated regions. The galaxies include a nearly complete range of morphological types spanning a factor of ~10^4 in luminosity and star formation rate. The survey data consists of images taken with ACS on HST, supplemented with archival data and new WFPC2 imaging taken after the failure of ACS. Survey images include wide field tilings covering the full radial extent of each galaxy, and single deep pointings in uncrowded regions of the most massive galaxies in the volume. The new wide field imaging in ANGST reaches median 50% completenesses of m_F475W=28.0 mag, m_F606W=27.3 mag, and m_F814W=27.3 mag, several magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). The deep fields reach magnitudes sufficient to fully resolve the structure in the red clump. The resulting photometric catalogs are publicly accessible and contain over 34 million photometric measurements of >14 million stars. In this paper we present the details of the sample selection, imaging, data reduction, and the resulting photometric catalogs, along with an analysis of the photometric uncertainties (systematic and random), for both the ACS and WFPC2 imaging. We also present uniformly derived relative distances measured from the apparent magnitude of the TRGB.
  • We report on the discovery of a faint (M_V ~ -10.6 +/- 0.2) dwarf spheroidal galaxy on deep F606W and F814W Hubble Space Telescope images of a Virgo intracluster field. The galaxy is easily resolved in our images, as our color magnitude diagram (CMD) extends > 1 magnitude beyond the tip of the red giant branch (RGB). Thus, it is the deepest CMD for a small dwarf galaxy inside a cluster environment. Using the colors of the RGB stars, we derive a metal abundance for the dwarf of [M/H]= -2.3 +/- 0.3, and show that the metallicity dispersion is less than 0.6 dex at 95% confidence. We also use the galaxy's lack of AGB stars and the absence of objects brighter than M_bol ~ -4.1 +/- 0.2 to show that the system is old (t >~10 Gyr). Finally, we derive the object's structural parameters, and show that the galaxy displays no obvious evidence of tidal threshing. Since the tip of the red giant branch distance ((m-M)_0 = 31.23 +/- 0.17 or D = 17.6 +/- 1.4 Mpc) puts the galaxy near the core of the Virgo cluster, one might expect the object to have undergone some tidal processing. Yet the chemical and morphological similarity between the dwarf and the dSph galaxies of the Local and M81 Group demonstrates that the object is indeed pristine, and not the shredded remains of a much larger galaxy. We discuss the possible origins of this galaxy, and suggest that it is just now falling into Virgo for the first time.
  • We have used the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) to detect and measure ~5300 stars in a single intracluster field in the Virgo Cluster. By performing F606W and F814W photometry on these stars, we have determined their metallicity distribution function, and constrained the types of stars present in this portion of Virgo's intracluster space. Based on the small number of stars detected brighter than the red giant branch (RGB) tip, we suggest that in this region, Virgo's intracluster stars are mostly old (>~10 Gyr). Through analysis of the RGB stars themselves, we determine that the population contains the full range of metallicities probed (-2.3<[M/H]<0.0). We also present evidence that the younger (<10 Gyr) component of the population is more metal-rich, with [M/H]>-0.5. The spatial distribution of the most metal-poor stars in the field shows significantly more structure than that of the metal-rich stars, indicating that the intracluster population is not well-mixed. We discuss the implications these observations have for the production of intracluster stars and the dynamical evolution of the Virgo Cluster.
  • We present the results of a Parkes Multibeam HI survey of six loose groups of galaxies analogous to the Local Group. This survey was sensitive to HI-rich objects in these groups to below 10^7 M(sun) of HI, and was designed to search for low mass, gas-rich satellite galaxies and potential analogs to the high-velocity clouds seen around the Milky Way. This survey detected a total of 79 HI-rich objects associated with the six groups, half of which were new detections. While the survey identified a small number of dwarf galaxies, no star-free HI clouds were discovered. The HI mass function of the six groups appears to be roughly flat as is that of the Local Group. The cumulative velocity distribution function (CVDF) of the HI-rich halos in the six groups is identical to that of the Local Group. Both of these facts imply that these groups are true analogs to the Local Group and that the Local Group is not unique in its lack of low-mass dwarf galaxies as compared to the predictions of cold dark matter models of galaxy formation. This survey also constrains the distance to and HI masses of the compact high-velocity clouds (CHVCs) around the Milky Way. The lack of CHVC analog detections implies that they are distributed within <160 kpc of the Milky Way and have average HI masses of <4x10^5 M(sun). The spatial distribution of CHVCs is consistent with the predictions of simulations for dark matter halos. Furthermore the CVDF of Local Group galaxies plus CHVCs matches the predicted CVDF of cold dark matter simulations of galaxy formation. This provides circumstantial evidence that CHVCs may be associated with low-mass dark matter halos.
  • (ABRIDGED) Gaseous halos of nine nearby galaxies (with redshifts cz < 6000 km/s) were probed at large galactocentric radii using background quasars observed with HST GHRS and STIS. The projected quasar-galaxy separations range from 55 to 387 h^{-1}_{75} kpc. Ly\alpha absorption lines were successfully detected in the spectra of five quasars, at impact parameters of up to 170 h^{-1}_{75} kpc from the center of the nearby galaxy, and in each case at wavelengths consistent with the galaxy's redshift. Our observations include the lowest redshift Ly\alpha lines detected to date. HI velocity fields were obtained at the VLA for three of the galaxies in our sample (and in one case was available from the literature), to derive their rotation curves. When comparing the inner rotation curves of the galaxies with the velocity at large radius provided by the Ly\alpha line it is apparent that it is very difficult to explain the observed Ly\alpha velocity as due to gas in an extended rotating disk. In most cases one would need to invoke large warps in the outer gas disks and also thick gas disks in order to reconcile the observed velocities with the predicted ones. In light of these results we conclude that in a typical galaxy there is no longer detectable atomic gas corotating in an extended disk at radii > 35 \alpha ^{-1}, where \alpha^{-1} is the stellar disk exponential scale-length. The cosmic web is the most likely origin for the detected Ly\alpha lines.
  • The formation and evolution of galaxies is one of the great outstanding problems of astrophysics. Within the broad context of hierachical structure formation, we have only a crude picture of how galaxies like our own came into existence. A detailed physical picture where individual stellar populations can be associated with (tagged to) elements of the protocloud is far beyond our current understanding. Important clues have begun to emerge from both the Galaxy (near-field cosmology) and the high redshift universe (far-field cosmology). Here we focus on the fossil evidence provided by the Galaxy. Detailed studies of the Galaxy lie at the core of understanding the complex processes involved in baryon dissipation. This is a necessary first step towards achieving a successful theory of galaxy formation.
  • We present the rotation velocities V and velocity dispersions sigma along the principal axes of seven elliptical galaxies less luminous than M_B= -19.5. These kinematics extend beyond the half-light radii for all systems in this photometrically selected sample. At large radii the kinematics not only confirm that rotation and "diskiness" are important in faint ellipticals, as was previously known, but also demonstrate that in most sample galaxies the stars at large galactocentric distances have (V/sigma)_max of about 2, similar to the disks in bona-fide S0 galaxies. Comparing this high degree of ordered stellar motion in all sample galaxies with numerical simulations of dissipationless mergers argues against mergers with mass ratios <=3:1 as an important mechanism in the final shaping of low-luminosity ellipticals, and favors instead the dissipative formation of a disk.