• We present two-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations of near-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf (WD) models for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using the turbulent deflagration model with deflagration-detonation transition (DDT). We perform a parameter survey for 41 models to study the effects of the initial central density (i.e., WD mass), metallicity, flame shape, DDT criteria, and turbulent flame formula for a much wider parameter space than earlier studies. The final isotopic abundances of $^{11}$C to $^{91}$Tc in these simulations are obtained by post-process nucleosynthesis calculations. The survey includes SNe Ia models with the central density from $5 \times 10^8$ g cm$^{-3}$ to $5 \times 10^9$ g cm$^{-3}$ (WD masses of 1.30 - 1.38 $M_\odot$), metallicity from 0 to 5 $Z_{\odot}$, C/O mass ratio from 0.3 - 1.0 and ignition kernels including centered and off-centered ignition kernels. We present the yield tables of stable isotopes from $^{12}$C to $^{70}$Zn as well as the major radioactive isotopes for 33 models. Observational abundances of $^{55}$Mn, $^{56}$Fe, $^{57}$Fe and $^{58}$Ni obtained from the solar composition, well-observed SNe Ia and SN Ia remnants are used to constrain the explosion models and the supernova progenitor. The connection between the pure turbulent deflagration model and the subluminous SNe Iax is discussed. We find that dependencies of the nucleosynthesis yields on the metallicity and the central density (WD mass) are large. To fit these observational abundances and also for the application of galactic chemical evolution modeling, these dependencies on the metallicity and WD mass should be taken into account.
  • We compare elemental abundance patterns of $\sim 200$ extremely metal-poor (EMP; [Fe/H]$<-3$) stars with supernova yields of metal-free stars in order to obtain insights into the characteristic masses of the first (Population III or Pop III) stars in the Universe. Supernova yields are prepared with nucleosynthesis calculations of metal-free stars with various initial masses ($M=$13, 15, 25, 40 and 100 $M_{\odot}$) and explosion energies ($E_{51}=E/10^{51}$[erg]$=0.5-60$) to include low-energy, normal-energy, and high-energy explosions. We adopt the mixing-fallback model to take into account possible asymmetry in the supernova explosions and the yields that best-fit the observed abundance patterns of the EMP stars are searched by varying the model parameters. We find that the abundance patterns of the EMP stars are predominantly best-fitted with the supernova yields with initial masses $M<40 M_{\odot}$, and that more than than half of the stars are best fitted with the $M=25 M_\odot$ hypernova ($E_{51}=10$) models. The results also indicate that the majority of the primordial supernovae have ejected $10^{-2}-10^{-1} M_\odot$ of $^{56}$Ni leaving behind a compact remnant, either a neutron star or a black hole, with mass in a range of $\sim 1.5-5 M_{\odot}$. The results suggest that the masses of the first stars responsible for the first metal-enrichment are predominantly $< 40 M_{\odot}$. This implies that the higher mass first stars were either less abundant or directly collapsing into a blackhole without ejecting heavy elements or that a supernova explosion of a higher-mass first star inhibits the formation of the next generation of low-mass stars at [Fe/H]$<-3$.
  • We report our first discoveries of high-redshift supernovae from the Subaru HIgh-Z sUpernova CAmpaign (SHIZUCA), a transient survey using Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam. We report the discovery of three supernovae at spectroscopically-confirmed redshifts of 2.399 (HSC16adga), 1.965 (HSC17auzg), and 1.851 (HSC17dbpf), and two supernova candidates with host-galaxy photometric redshifts of 3.2 (HSC16apuo) and 4.2 (HSC17dsid), respectively. In this paper, we present their photometric properties and the spectroscopic properties of the confirmed high-redshift supernovae are presented in the accompanying paper Curtin et al. (2018). The supernovae with the confirmed redshifts of z ~ 2 have rest ultraviolet peak magnitudes of around -21 mag, which make them superluminous supernovae. The discovery of three supernovae at z ~ 2 roughly corresponds to an event rate of ~ 900 Gpc-3 yr-1, which is already consistent with the total superluminous supernova rate estimated by extrapolating the local rate based on the cosmic star-formation history. Adding unconfirmed superluminous supernova candidates would increase the event rate. Our superluminous supernova candidates at the redshifts of around 3 and 4 indicate minimum superluminous supernova rates of ~ 400 Gpc-3 yr-1 (z ~ 3) and ~ 500 Gpc-3 yr-1 (z ~ 4). Because we have only performed a pilot search for high-redshift supernovae so far and have not completed selecting all the high-redshift supernova candidates, these rates are lower limits. Our initial results demonstrate the amazing capability of Hyper Suprime-Cam to discover high-redshift supernovae.
  • We present Keck spectroscopic confirmation of three superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) at z = 1.851, 1.965 and 2.399 detected as part of the Subaru HIgh-Z sUpernova CAmpaign (SHIZUCA). The host galaxies have multi-band photometric redshifts consistent with the spectroscopic values. The supernovae were detected during their rise, allowing the spectra to be taken near maximum light. The restframe far-ultraviolet (FUV; ~1000--2500A) spectra are made up in flux of approximately equal parts supernova and host galaxy. Weather conditions during observations were not ideal, and while the signal-to-noise ratios of the spectra are sufficient for redshift confirmation, the type of each event remains ambiguous. We compare our spectra to the few low redshift SLSN FUV spectra available to date and offer an interpretation as to the type of each supernova. We prefer SLSN-II classifications for all three events. The success of the first SHIZUCA Keck spectroscopic follow-up program is encouraging. It demonstrates that campaigns such as SHIZUCA are capable of identifying high redshift SLSNe with sufficient accuracy, speed and depth for rapid, well-cadenced and informative follow-up.
  • Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) arise from the thermonuclear explosion of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs. Though the uniformity of their light curves makes them powerful cosmological distance indicators, long-standing issues remain regarding their progenitors and explosion mechanisms. Recent detection of the early ultraviolet pulse of a peculiar subluminous SN Ia has been claimed as new evidence for the companion-ejecta interaction through the single-degenerate channel. Here, we report the discovery of a prominent but red optical flash at $\sim$ 0.5 days after the explosion of a SN Ia which shows hybrid features of different SN Ia sub-classes: a light curve typical of normal-brightness SNe Ia, but with strong titanium absorptions, commonly seen in the spectra of subluminous ones. We argue that the early flash of such a hybrid SN Ia is different from predictions of previously suggested scenarios such as the companion-ejecta interaction. Instead it can be naturally explained by a SN explosion triggered by a detonation of a thin helium shell either on a near-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf ($\gtrsim$ 1.3 M$_{\odot}$) with low-yield $^{56}$Ni or on a sub-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf ($\sim$ 1.0 M$_{\odot}$) merging with a less massive white dwarf. This finding provides compelling evidence that one branch of the previously proposed explosion models, the helium-ignition scenario, does exist in nature, and such a scenario may account for explosions of white dwarfs in a wider mass range in contrast to what was previously supposed.
  • Observations of Gaia16apd revealed extremely luminous ultraviolet emission among superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). Using radiation hydrodynamics simulations we perform a comparison of UV light curves, color temperatures and photospheric velocities between the most popular SLSN models: pair-instability supernova, magnetar and interaction with circumstellar medium. We find that the interaction model is the most promising to explain the extreme UV luminosity of Gaia16apd. The differences in late-time UV emission and in color evolution found between the models can be used to link an observed SLSN event to the most appropriate model. Observations at UV wavelengths can be used to clarify the nature of SLSNe and more attention should be paid to them in future follow-up observations.
  • We investigate nucleosynthesis in tidal disruption events (TDEs) of white dwarfs (WDs) by intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs). We consider various types of WDs with different masses and compositions by means of 3 dimensional (3D) smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations. We model these WDs with different numbers of SPH particles, $N$, from a few $10^4$ to a few $10^7$, in order to check mass resolution convergence, where SPH simulations with $N>10^7$ (or a space resolution of several $10^6$ cm) have unprecedentedly high resolution in this kind of simulations. We find that nuclear reactions become less active with increasing $N$, and that these nuclear reactions are excited by spurious heating due to low resolution. Moreover, we find no shock wave generation. In order to investigate the reason for the absence of a shock wave, we additionally perform 1 dimensional (1D) SPH and mesh-based simulations with a space resolution ranging from $10^4$ to $10^7$ cm, using characteristic flow structure extracted from the 3D SPH simulations. We find shock waves in these 1D high-resolution simulations. One of these shock waves triggers a detonation wave. However, we have to be careful of the fact that, if the shock wave emerged at a bit outer region, it could not trigger the detonation wave due to low density. Note that the 1D initial conditions lack accuracy to precisely determine where a shock wave emerges. We need to perform 3D simulations with $\lesssim 10^6$ cm space resolution in order to conclude that WD TDEs become optical transients powered by radioactive nuclei.
  • We present modelling of line polarization to study multi-dimensional geometry of stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae (SNe). We demonstrate that a purely axisymmetric, two-dimensional geometry cannot reproduce a loop in the Stokes Q-U diagram, i.e., a variation of the polarization angles along the velocities associated with the absorption lines. On the contrary, three-dimensional (3D) clumpy structures naturally reproduce the loop. The fact that the loop is commonly observed in stripped-envelope SNe suggests that SN ejecta generally have a 3D structure. We study the degree of line polarization as a function of the absorption depth for various 3D clumpy models with different clump sizes and covering factors. Comparison between the calculated and observed degree of line polarization indicates that a typical size of the clump is relatively large, >~ 25 % of the photospheric radius. Such large-scale clumps are similar to those observed in the SN remnant Cassiopeia A. Given the small size of the observed sample, the covering factor of the clumps is only weakly constrained (~ 5-80 %). The presence of large-scale clumpy structure suggests that the large-scale convection or standing accretion shock instability takes place at the onset of the explosion.
  • Being a superluminous supernova (SLSN), PTF12dam can be explained by a $^{56}$Ni-powered model, a magnetar-powered model or an interaction model. We propose that PTF12dam is a pulsational pair instability supernova, where the outer envelope of a progenitor is ejected during the pulsations. Thus, it is powered by double energy source: radioactive decay of $^{56}$Ni and a radiative shock in a dense circumstellar medium. To describe multicolor light curves and spectra we use radiation hydrodynamics calculations of STELLA code. We found that light curves are well described in the model with 40M$_{\odot}$ ejecta and 20-40M$_{\odot}$ circumstellar medium. The ejected $^{56}$Ni mass is about 6M$_{\odot}$ which results from explosive nucleosynthesis with large explosion energy (2-3)$\cdot$10$^{52}$ ergs. In comparison with alternative scenarios of pair-instability supernova and magnetar-powered supernova, in interaction model all the observed main photometric characteristics are well reproduced: multicolor light curves, color temperatures, and photospheric velocities.
  • Supermassive stars (SMS; ~ 10^5 M_sun) formed from metal-free gas in the early Universe attract attention as progenitors of supermassive black holes observed at high redshifts. To form SMSs by accretion, central protostars must accrete at as high rates as ~ 0.1-1 M_sun/yr. Such protostars have very extended structures with bloated envelopes, like super-giant stars, and are called super-giant protostars (SGPSs). Under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium, SGPSs have density inverted layers, where the luminosity becomes locally super-Eddington, near the surface. If the envelope matter is allowed to flow out, however, a stellar wind could be launched and hinder the accretion growth of SGPSs before reaching the supermassive regime. We examine whether radiation-driven winds are launched from SGPSs by constructing steady and spherically symmetric wind solutions. We find that the wind velocity does not reach the escape velocity in any case considered. This is because once the temperature falls below ~ 10^4 K, the opacity plummet drastically owing to the recombination of hydrogen and the acceleration ceases suddenly. This indicates that, in realistic non-steady cases, even if outflows are launched from the surface of SGPSs, they would fall back again. Such a "wind" does not result in net mass loss and does not prevent the growth of SGPSs. In conclusion, SGPSs will grow to SMSs and eventually collapse to massive BHs of ~ 10^5 M_sun, as long as the rapid accretion is maintained.
  • Recent experimental results have confirmed a possible reduction in the GT$_+$ strengths of pf-shell nuclei. These proton-rich nuclei are of relevance in the deflagration and explosive burning phases of Type Ia supernovae. While prior GT strengths result in nucleosynthesis predictions with a lower-than-expected electron fraction, a reduction in the GT$_+$ strength can result in an slightly increased electron fraction compared to previous shell model predictions, though the enhancement is not as large as previous enhancements in going from rates computed by Fuller, Fowler, and Newman based on an independent particle model. A shell model parametrization has been developed which more closely matches experimental GT strengths. The resultant electron-capture rates are used in nucleosynthesis calculations for carbon deflagration and explosion phases of Type Ia supernovae, and the final mass fractions are compared to those obtained using more commonly-used rates.
  • A number of Type I (hydrogenless) superluminous supernova (SLSN) events have been discovered recently. However, their nature remains debatable. One of the most promising ideas is the shock-interaction mechanism, but only simplified semi-analytical models have been applied so far. We simulate light curves for several Type I SLSN (SLSN-I) models enshrouded by dense, non-hydrogen circumstellar envelopes, using a multi-group radiation hydrodynamics code that predicts not only bolometric, but also multicolor light curves. We demonstrate that the bulk of SLSNe-I including those with relatively narrow light curves like SN 2010gx or broad ones like PTF09cnd can be explained by the interaction of the SN ejecta with he CS envelope, though the range of parameters for these models is rather wide. Moderate explosion energy ($\sim (2 - 4)\cdot 10^{51}$ ergs) is sufficient to explain both narrow and broad SLSN-I light curves, but ejected mass and envelope mass differ for those two cases. Only 5 to 10 $M_\odot$ of non-hydrogen material is needed to reproduce the light curve of SN 2010gx, while the best model for PTF09cnd is very massive: it contains almost $ 50 M_\odot $ in the CS envelope and only $ 5 M_\odot $ in the ejecta. The CS envelope for each case extends from 10 $R_\odot$ to $\sim 10^5R_\odot$ ($7\cdot 10^{15} $ cm), which is about an order of magnitude larger than typical photospheric radii of standard SNe near the maximum light. We briefly discuss possible ways to form such unusual envelopes.
  • In the ONeMg cores of $8.8-9.5~{\rm M}_\odot$ stars, neon and oxygen burning is ignited off-center. Whether the neon-oxygen flame propagates to the center is critical to determine whether these stars undergo Fe core collapse or electron capture induced ONeMg core collapse. We present more details of stars that ignite neon and oxygen burning off-center. The neon flame is established in a similar manner to the carbon flame of super-AGB stars, albeit with a narrower flame width. The criteria for establishing a flame are able to be met if the strict Schwarzschild criterion for convective instability is adopted. Mixing across the interface of the convective shell disrupts the conditions for the propagation of the burning front and instead the shell burns as a series of inward-moving flashes. While this may not directly affect whether the burning will reach the center (as in super-AGB stars), the core is allowed to contract between each shell flash. Reduction of the electron fraction in the shell reduces the Chandrasekhar mass and the center reaches the threshold density for the URCA process to activate and steer the remaining evolution of the core. This highlights the importance of a more accurate treatment of mixing in the stellar interior for yet another important question in stellar astrophysics - determining the properties of stellar evolution and supernova progenitors at the boundary between electron capture supernova and iron core-collapse supernova.
  • Supernova (SN) iPTF13bvn in NGC 5806 was the first Type Ib SN to have been tentatively associated with a progenitor candidate in pre-explosion images. We performed deep ultraviolet (UV) and optical Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the SN site 740 days after explosion. We detect an object in the optical bands that is fainter than the pre-explosion object. This dimming is likely not produced by dust absorption in the ejecta; thus, our finding confirms the connection of the progenitor candidate with the SN. The object in our data is likely dominated by the fading SN, which implies that the pre-SN flux is mostly due to the progenitor. We compare our revised pre-SN photometry with previously proposed progenitor models. Although binary progenitors are favored, models need to be refined. In particular, to comply with our deep UV detection limit, any companion star must be less luminous than a late-O star or substantially obscured by newly formed dust. A definitive progenitor characterization will require further observations to disentangle the contribution of a much fainter SN and its environment.
  • We present a new method to effectively select objects which may be low-mass active black holes (BHs) at galaxy centers using high-cadence optical imaging data, and our first spectroscopic identification of an active 2.7x10^6 Msun BH at z=0.164. This active BH was originally selected due to its rapid optical variability, from a few hours to a day, based on Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam~(HSC) g-band imaging data taken with 1-hour cadence. Broad and narrow H-alpha and many other emission lines are detected in our optical spectra taken with Subaru FOCAS, and the BH mass is measured via the broad H-alpha emission line width (1,880 km s^{-1}) and luminosity (4.2x10^{40} erg s^{-1}) after careful correction for the atmospheric absorption around 7,580-7,720A. We measure the Eddington ratio to be as low as 0.05, considerably smaller than those in a previous SDSS sample with similar BH mass and redshift, which indicates one of the strong potentials of our Subaru survey. The g-r color and morphology of the extended component indicate that the host galaxy is a star-forming galaxy. We also show effectiveness of our variability selection for low-mass active BHs.
  • Mergers of carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs) are considered as one of the potential progenitors of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Recent hydrodynamical simulations showed that the less massive (secondary) WD violently accretes onto the more massive (primary) one, carbon detonation occurs, the detonation wave propagates through the primary, and the primary finally explodes as a sub-Chandrasekhar mass SN Ia. Such an explosion mechanism is called the violent merger scenario. Based on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of merging CO WDs, we derived more stringent critical mass ratio (qcr) leading to the violent merger scenario than the previous results. We conclude that this difference mainly comes from the differences in the initial condition, synchronously spinning of WDs or not. Using our new results, we estimated the brightness distribution of SNe Ia in the violent merger scenario and compared it with previous studies. We found that our new qcr does not significantly affect the brightness distribution. We present the direct outcome immediately following CO WD mergers for various primary masses and mass ratios. We also discussed the final fate of the central system of the bipolar planetary nebula Henize 2-428, which was recently suggested to be a double CO WD system whose total mass exceeds the Chandrasekhar-limiting mass, merging within the Hubble time. Even considering the uncertainties in the proposed binary parameters, we concluded that the final fate of this system is almost certainly a sub-Chandrasekhar mass SN Ia in the violent merger scenario.
  • For an accurate treatment of the shock wave propagation in high-energy astrophysical phenomena, such as supernova shock breakouts, gamma-ray bursts and accretion disks, knowledge of radiative transfer plays a crucial role. In this paper we consider one-dimensional (1D) special relativistic radiation hydrodynamics by solving the Boltzmann equation for radiative transfer. The structure of a radiative shock is calculated for a number of shock tube problems, including strong shock waves, and relativistic- and radiation-dominated cases. Calculations are performed using an iterative technique that consistently solves the equations of relativistic hydrodynamics and relativistic comoving radiative transfer. A comparison of radiative transfer solutions with the Eddington approximation and the M1 closure is made. A qualitative analysis of moment equations for radiation is performed and the conditions for the existence of jump discontinuity for non-relativistic cases are investigated numerically.
  • The properties of the first generation of stars and their supernova (SN) explosions remains unknown due to the lack of their actual observations. Recently many transient surveys are conducted and the feasibility of the detection of supernovae (SNe) of Pop III stars is growing. In this paper we study the multicolor light curves for a number of metal-free core-collapse SN models (25-100 M$_{\odot}$) to provide the indicators for finding and identification of first generation SNe. We use mixing-fallback supernova explosion models which explain the observed abundance patterns of metal poor stars. Numerical calculations of the multicolor light curves are performed using multigroup radiation hydrodynamic code STELLA. The calculated light curves of metal-free SNe are compared with non-zero metallicity models and several observed SNe. We have found that the shock breakout characteristics, the evolution of the photosphere's velocity, the luminosity, the duration and color evolution of the plateau - all the SN phases are helpful to estimate the parameters of SN progenitor: the mass, the radius, the explosion energy and the metallicity. We conclude that the multicolor light curves can be potentially used to identify first generation SNe in the current (Subaru/HSC) and future transient surveys (LSST, JWST). They are also suitable for identification of the low-metallicity SNe in the nearby Universe (PTF, Pan-STARRS, Gaia).
  • We present rapidly rising transients discovered by a high-cadence transient survey with Subaru telescope and Hyper Suprime-Cam. We discovered five transients at z=0.384-0.821 showing the rising rate faster than 1 mag per 1 day in the restframe near-ultraviolet wavelengths. The fast rising rate and brightness are the most similar to SN 2010aq and PS1-13arp, for which the ultraviolet emission within a few days after the shock breakout was detected. The lower limit of the event rate of rapidly rising transients is ~9 % of core-collapse supernova rates, assuming a duration of rapid rise to be 1 day. We show that the light curves of the three faint objects agree with the cooling envelope emission from the explosion of red supergiants. The other two luminous objects are, however, brighter and faster than the cooling envelope emission. We interpret these two objects to be the shock breakout from dense wind with the mass loss rate of ~10^{-3} Msun yr^{-1}, as also proposed for PS1-13arp. This mass loss rate is higher than that typically observed for red supergiants. The event rate of these luminous objects is >~1 % of core-collapse supernova rate, and thus, our study implies that more than ~1 % of massive stars can experience an intensive mass loss at a few years before the explosion.
  • Two recently discovered very luminous supernovae (SNe) present stimulating cases to explore the extents of the available theoretical models. SN 2011kl represents the first detection of a supernova explosion associated with an ultra-long duration gamma ray burst. ASASSN-15lh was even claimed as the most luminous SN ever discovered, challenging the scenarios so far proposed for stellar explosions. Here we use our radiation hydrodynamics code in order to simulate magnetar powered SNe. To avoid explicitly assuming neutron star properties we adopt the magnetar luminosity and spin-down timescale as free parameters of the model. We find that the light curve (LC) of SN 2011kl is consistent with a magnetar power source, as previously proposed, but we note that some amount of 56^Ni (> 0.08 M_sun) is necessary to explain the low contrast between the LC peak and tail. For the case of ASASSN-15lh we find physically plausible magnetar parameters that reproduce the overall shape of the LC provided the progenitor mass is relatively large (a mass of the ejecta approx 6 M_sun). The ejecta hydrodynamics of this event is dominated by the magnetar input, while the effect is more moderate for SN 2011kl. We conclude that a magnetar model may be used for the interpretation of these events and that the hydrodynamic modeling is necessary to derive the properties of powerful magnetars and their progenitors.
  • Electron capture and beta-decay rates for nuclear pairs in sd-shell are evaluated at high densities and high temperatures relevant to the final evolution of electron-degenerate O-Ne-Mg cores of stars with the initial masses of 8-10 solar mass. Electron capture induces a rapid contraction of the electron-degenerate O-Ne-Mg core. The outcome of rapid contraction depends on the evolutionary changes in the central density and temperature, which are determined by the competing processes of contraction, cooling, and heating. The fate of the stars are determined by these competitions, whether they end up with electron-capture supernovae or Fe core-collapse supernovae. Since the competing processes are induced by electron capture and beta-decay, the accurate weak rates are crucially important. The rates are obtained for pairs with A=20, 23, 24, 25 and 27 by shell-model calculations in sd-shell with the USDB Hamiltonian. Effects of Coulomb corrections on the rates are evaluated. The rates for pairs with A=23 and 25 are important for nuclear URCA processes that determine the cooling rate of O-Ne-Mg core, while those for pairs with A=20 and 24 are important for the core-contraction and heat generation rates in the core. We provide these nuclear rates at stellar environments in tables with fine enough meshes at various densities and temperatures for the studies of astrophysical processes sensitive to the rates. In particular, the accurate rate tables are crucially important for the final fates of not only O-Ne-Mg cores but also a wider range of stars such as C-O cores of lower mass stars.
  • Hubble Space Telescope observations of the site of the supernova (SN) 2008ax obtained in 2011 and 2013 reveal that the possible progenitor object detected in pre-explosion images was in fact multiple. Four point sources are resolved in the new, higher-resolution images. We identify one of the sources with the fading SN. The other three objects are consistent with single supergiant stars. We conclude that their light contaminated the previously identified progenitor candidate. After subtraction of these stars, the progenitor appears to be significantly fainter and bluer than previously measured. Post-explosion photometry at the SN location indicates that the progenitor object has disappeared. If single, the progenitor is compatible with a supergiant star of B to mid-A spectral type, while a Wolf-Rayet (WR) star would be too luminous in the ultraviolet to account for the observations. Moreover, our hydrodynamical modelling shows the pre-explosion mass was $4-5$ $M_\odot$ and the radius was $30-50$ $R_\odot$, which is incompatible with a WR progenitor. We present a possible interacting binary progenitor computed with our evolutionary models that reproduces all the observational evidence. A companion star as luminous as an O9-B0 main-sequence star may have remained after the explosion.
  • Mergers of two carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs) have been considered as progenitors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, previous studies claimed that mergers of CO WDs lead to an SN Ia explosion either in the dynamical merger phase or stationary rotating merger remnant phase. However, the mass range of CO WDs that lead to an SN Ia has not been clearly identified yet. In the present work, we perform systematic SPH merger simulations for the WD masses ranging from $0.5~M_{\odot}$ to $1.1~M_{\odot}$ with higher resolutions than the previous systematic surveys and examine whether or not carbon burning occurs dynamically or quiescently in each phase. We further study the possibility of SN Ia explosion and estimate the mass range of CO WDs that lead to an SN Ia. We found that when the both WDs are massive, i.e., in the mass range of $0.9~M_{\odot} {\le} M_{1,2} {\le} 1.1~M_{\odot}$, they can explode as an SN Ia in the merger phase. On the other hand, when the more massive WD is in the range of $0.7~M_{\odot} {\le} M_{1} {\le} 0.9~M_{\odot}$ and the total mass exceeds $1.38~M_{\odot}$, they can finally explode in the stationary rotating merger remnant phase. We estimate the contribution of CO WD mergers to the entire SN Ia rate in our galaxy to be of ${\lt} 9\%$. So, it might be difficult to explain all galactic SNe Ia by CO WD mergers.
  • We perform smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations for merging binary carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs) with masses of $1.1$ and $1.0$ $M_\odot$, until the merger remnant reaches a dynamically steady state. Using these results, we assess whether the binary could induce a thermonuclear explosion, and whether the explosion could be observed as a type Ia supernova (SN Ia). We investigate three explosion mechanisms: a helium-ignition following the dynamical merger (`helium-ignited violent merger model'), a carbon-ignition (`carbon-ignited violent merger model'), and an explosion following the formation of the Chandrasekhar mass WD (`Chandrasekhar mass model'). An explosion of the helium-ignited violent merger model is possible, while we predict that the resulting SN ejecta are highly asymmetric since its companion star is fully intact at the time of the explosion. The carbon-ignited violent merger model can also lead to an explosion. However, the envelope of the exploding WD spreads out to $\sim 0.1R_\odot$; it is much larger than that inferred for SN 2011fe ($< 0.1R_\odot $) while much smaller than that for SN 2014J ($\sim 1R_\odot$). For the particular combination of the WD masses studied in this work, the Chandrasekhar mass model is not successful to lead to an SN Ia explosion. Besides these assessments, we investigate the evolution of unbound materials ejected through the merging process (`merger ejecta'), assuming a case where the SN Ia explosion is not triggered by the helium- or carbon-ignition during the merger. The merger ejecta interact with the surrounding interstellar medium, and form a shell. The shell has a bolometric luminosity of more than $2 \times 10^{35}$ ergs$^{-1}$ lasting for $\sim 2 \times 10^4$ yr. If this is the case, Milky Way should harbor about $10$ such shells at any given time.
  • Recent extensive observations of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) have revealed the existence of a diversity of SNe Ia, including SNe Iax. We introduce two possible channels in the single degenerate scenario: 1) double detonations in sub-Chandrasekhar (Ch) mass CO white dwarfs (WDs), where a thin He envelope is developed with relatively low accretion rates after He novae even at low metallicities, and 2) carbon deflagrations in Ch-mass possibly hybrid C+O+Ne WDs, where WD winds occur at [Fe/H] ~ -2.5 at high accretion rates. These subclasses of SNe Ia are rarer than `normal' SNe Ia and do not affect the chemical evolution in the solar neighborhood, but can be very important in metal-poor systems with stochastic star formation. In dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group, the decrease of [\alpha/Fe] ratios at [Fe/H] ~ -2 to -1.5 can be produced depending on the star formation history. SNe Iax give high [Mn/Fe], while sub-Ch-mass SNe Ia give low [Mn/Fe], and thus a model including a mix of the two is favoured by the available observations.