• Angular momentum plays very important roles in the formation of PBHs in the matter-dominated phase if it lasts sufficiently long. In fact, most collapsing masses are bounced back due to centrifugal force, since angular momentum significantly grows before collapse. As a consequence, most of the formed PBHs are rapidly rotating near the extreme value $a_{*}=1$, where $a_{*}$ is the nondimensional Kerr parameter at their formation. The smaller the density fluctuation $\sigma_{H}$ at horizon entry is, the stronger the tendency towards the extreme rotation. Combining the effect of angular momentum with that of anisotropy, we estimate the black hole production rate. We find that the production rate suffers from suppression dominantly due to angular momentum for a smaller value of $\sigma_{H}$, while due to anisotrpopy for a larger value of $\sigma_{H}$. We argue that matter domination significantly enhances the production of PBHs despite the suppression. If the matter-dominated phase does not last so long, the effect of the finite duration significantly suppresses PBH formation and weakens the tendency towards large spins. (abridged)
  • Energy extraction from a rotating or charged black hole is one of fascinating issues in general relativity. The collisional Penrose process is one of such extraction mechanisms and has been reconsidered intensively since Banados, Silk and West pointed out the physical importance of very high energy collisions around a maximally rotating black hole. In order to get results analytically, the test particle approximation has been adopted so far. Successive works based on this approximation scheme have not yet revealed the upper bound on the efficiency of the energy extraction because of lack of the back reaction. In the Reissner-Nordstrom spacetime, by fully taking into account the self-gravity of the shells, we find that there is an upper bound on the extracted energy, which is consistent with the area law of a black hole. We also show one particular scenario in which the almost maximum energy extraction is achieved even without the Banados-Silk-West collision.
  • The superspinar proposed by Gimon and Horava is a rapidly rotating compact entity whose exterior is described by the over-spinning Kerr geometry. The compact entity itself is expected to be governed by superstringy effects, and in astrophysical scenarios it can give rise to interesting observable phenomena. Earlier it was suggested that the superspinar may not be stable but we point out here that this does not necessarily follow from earlier studies. We show, by analytically treating the Teukolsky equations by Detwiler's method, that in fact there are infinitely many boundary conditions that make the superspinar stable, and that the modes will decay in time. It follows that we need to know more on the physical nature of the superspinar in order to decide on its stability in physical reality.
  • We analytically study the non-linear stability of a spherically symmetric wormhole supported by an infinitesimally thin brane of negative tension, which has been devised by Barcelo and Visser. We consider a situation in which a thin spherical shell composed of dust falls into an initially static wormhole; The dust shell plays a role of the non-linear disturbance. The self-gravity of the falling dust shell is completely taken into account through Israel's formalism of the metric junction. When the dust shell goes through the wormhole, it necessarily collides with the brane supporting the wormhole. We assume the interaction between these shells is only gravity and show the condition under which the wormhole stably persists after the dust shell goes through it.
  • Usually, we assume that there is no inhomogeneity isotropic in terms of our location in our uni- verse. This assumption has not been observationally confirmed yet in sufficient accuracy, and we need to consider the possibility that there are non-negligible large-scale isotropic inhomogeneities in our universe. The existence of large-scale isotropic inhomogeneities affects the determination of the cosmological parameters. In particular, from only the distance-redshift relation, we can not dis- tinguish the inhomogeneous isotropic universe model from the homogeneous isotropic one, because of the ambiguity in the cosmological parameters. In this paper, in order to avoid such ambiguity, we consider three observables, the distance-redshift relation, the fluctuation spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation(CMBR) and the scale of the baryon acoustic oscillation(BAO), and compare these observables in two universe models; One is the inhomogeneous isotropic uni- verse model with the cosmological constant and the other is the homogeneous isotropic universe model with the dark energy other than the cosmological constant. We show that these two universe models can not predict the same observational data of all three observables but the same ones of only two of three, as long as the perturbations are adiabatic. In principle, we can distinguish the inhomogeneous isotropic universe from the homogeneous isotropic one through appropriate three observables, if the perturbations are adiabatic.
  • We investigate primordial black hole formation in the matter-dominated phase of the Universe, where nonspherical effects in gravitational collapse play a crucial role. This is in contrast to the black hole formation in a radiation-dominated era. We apply the Zel'dovich approximation, Thorne's hoop conjecture, and Doroshkevich's probability distribution and subsequently derive the production probability $\beta_{0}$ of primordial black holes. The numerical result obtained is applicable even if the density fluctuation $\sigma$ at horizon entry is of the order of unity. For $\sigma\ll 1$, we find a semi-analytic formula $\beta_{0}\simeq 0.05556 \sigma^{5}$, which is comparable with the Khlopov-Polnarev formula. We find that the production probability in the matter-dominated era is much larger than that in the radiation-dominated era for $\sigma\lesssim 0.05$, while they are comparable with each other for $\sigma\gtrsim 0.05$. We also discuss how $\sigma$ can be written in terms of primordial curvature perturbations.
  • It has been expected that astronomical observations to detect the orbital angular momenta of electromagnetic waves may give us a new insight into astrophysics. Previous works pointed out the possibility that a rotating black hole can produce orbital angular momenta of electromagnetic waves through gravitational scattering, and the spin parameter of the black hole can be measured by observing them. However, the mechanism how the orbital angular momentum of the electromagnetic wave is generated by the gravitational scattering has not been clarified sufficiently. In this paper, in order to understand it from a point of view of gravitational lensing effects, we consider an emitter which radiates a spherical wave of the real massless scalar field and study the deformation of the scalar wave by the gravitational scattering due to a black hole by invoking the geometrical optics approximation. We show that the frame dragging caused by the rotating black hole is not a necessary condition for generating the orbital angular momentum of the scalar wave. However, its components parallel to the direction cosines of images appear only if the black hole is rotating.
  • The origin of the ultra-high-energy particles we receive on the Earth from the outer space such as EeV cosmic rays and PeV neutrinos remains an enigma. All mechanisms known to us currently make use of electromagnetic interaction to accelerate charged particles. In this paper we propose a mechanism exclusively based on gravity rather than electromagnetic interaction. We show that it is possible to generate ultra-high-energy particles starting from particles with moderate energies using the collisional Penrose process in an overspinning Kerr spacetime transcending the Kerr bound only by an infinitesimal amount, i.e., with the Kerr parameter $a=M(1+\epsilon)$, where we take the limit $\epsilon \rightarrow 0^+$. We consider two massive particles starting from rest at infinity that collide at $r=M$ with divergent center-of-mass energy and produce two massless particles. We show that massless particles produced in the collision can escape to infinity with the ultra-high energies exploiting the collisional Penrose process with the divergent efficiency $\eta \sim {1}/{\sqrt{\epsilon}} \rightarrow \infty$. Assuming the isotropic emission of massless particles in the center-of-mass frame of the colliding particles, we show that half of the particles created in the collisions escape to infinity with the divergent energies. To a distant observer, ultra-high-energy particles appear to originate from a bright spot which is at the angular location $\xi \sim {2M}/{r_{obs}}$ with respect to the singularity on the side which is rotating towards the observer. We show that the anisotropy in emission in the center-of-mass frame, which is dictated by the differential cross-section of underlying particle physics process, leaves a district signature on the spectrum of ultra-high-energy massless particles. Thus, it provides a unique probe into fundamental particle physics.
  • We make a critical comparison between ultra-high energy particle collisions around an extremal Kerr black hole and that around an over-spinning Kerr singularity, mainly focusing on the issue of the timescale of collisions. We show that the time required for two massive particles with the proton mass or two massless particles of GeV energies to collide around the Kerr black hole with Planck energy is several orders of magnitude longer than the age of the Universe for astro-physically relevant masses of black holes, whereas time required in the over-spinning case is of the order of ten million years which is much shorter than the age of the Universe. Thus from the point of view of observation of Planck scale collisions, the over-spinning Kerr geometry, subject to their occurrence, has distinct advantage over their black hole counterparts.
  • Usually the effects of isotropic inhomogeneities are not seriously taken into account in the determination of the cosmological parameters because of Copernican principle whose statement is that we do not live in the privileged domain in the universe. But Copernican principle has not been observationally confirmed yet in sufficient accuracy, and there is the possibility that there are non-negligible large-scale isotropic inhomogeneities in our universe. In this paper, we study the effects of the isotropic inhomogeneities on the determination of the cosmological parameters and show the probability that non-Copernican isotropic inhomogeneities mislead us into believing, for example, the phantom energy of the equation of state, $p=w\rho$ with $w<-1$, even in case that $w=-1$ is the true value.
  • The angular momentum of the Kerr singularity should not be larger than a threshold value so that it is enclosed by an event horizon: The Kerr singularity with the angular momentum exceeding the threshold value is naked. This fact suggests that if the cosmic censorship exists in our Universe, an over-spinning body without releasing its angular momentum cannot collapse to spacetime singularities. A simple kinematical estimate of two particles approaching each other supports this expectation and suggests the existence of a minimum size of an over-spinning body. But this does not imply that the geometry near the naked singularity cannot appear. By analyzing initial data, i.e., a snapshot of a spinning body, we see that an over-spinning body may produce a geometry close to the Kerr naked singularity around itself at least as a transient configuration.
  • Recently, the present authors studied perturbations in the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi cosmological model by applying the second-order perturbation theory in the dust Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe model. Before this work, the same subject was studied in some papers by analyzing linear perturbations in the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi cosmological model under the assumption proposed by Clarkson, Clifton and February, in which two of perturbation variables are negligible. However, it is a non-trivial issue in what situation the Clarkson-Clifton-February assumption is valid. In this paper, we investigate differences between these two approaches. It is shown that, in general, these two approaches are not compatible with each other. That is, in our perturbative procedure, the Clarkson-Clifton-February assumption is not valid at the order of our interest.
  • We consider a test of the Copernican Principle through observations of the large-scale structures, and for this purpose we study the self-gravitating system in a relativistic huge void universe model which does not invoke the Copernican Principle. If we focus on the the weakly self-gravitating and slowly evolving system whose spatial extent is much smaller than the scale of the cosmological horizon in the homogeneous and isotropic background universe model, the cosmological Newtonian approximation is available. Also in the huge void universe model, the same kind of approximation as the cosmological Newtonian approximation is available for the analysis of the perturbations contained in a region whose spatial size is much smaller than the scale of the huge void: the effects of the huge void are taken into account in a perturbative manner by using the Fermi-normal coordinates. By using this approximation, we derive the equations of motion for the weakly self-gravitating perturbations whose elements have relative velocities much smaller than the speed of light, and show the derived equations can be significantly different from those in the homogeneous and isotropic universe model, due to the anisotropic volume expansion in the huge void. We linearize the derived equations of motion and solve them. The solutions show that the behaviors of linear density perturbations are very different from those in the homogeneous and isotropic universe model.
  • Time evolution of a black hole lattice universe is simulated. The vacuum Einstein equations in a cubic box with a black hole at the origin are numerically solved with periodic boundary conditions on all pairs of opposite faces. Defining effective scale factors by using the area of a surface and the length of an edge of the cubic box, we compare them with that in the Einstein-deSitter universe. It is found that the behaviour of the effective scale factors is well approximated by that in the Einstein-deSitter universe. Our result suggests that local inhomogeneities do not significantly affect the global expansion law of the universe even if the inhomogeneity is extremely nonlinear.
  • We analytically explore the effect of falling matter on a spherically symmetric wormhole supported by a spherical shell composed of exotic matter located at its throat. The falling matter is assumed to be also a thin spherical shell concentric with the shell supporting the wormhole, and its self-gravity is completely taken into account. We treat these spherical thin shells by Israel's formalism of metric junction. When the falling spherical shell goes through the wormhole, it necessarily collides with the shell supporting the wormhole. To treat this collision, we assume the interaction between these shells is only gravity. We show the conditions on the parameters that characterize this model in which the wormhole persists after the spherical shell goes through it.
  • We study the two-point correlation function of density perturbations in a spherically symmetric void universe model which does not employ the Copernican principle. First we solve perturbation equations in the inhomogeneous universe model and obtain density fluctuations by using a method of non-linear perturbation theory which was adopted in our previous paper. From the obtained solutions, we calculate the two-point correlation function and show that it has a local anisotropy at the off-center position differently from those in homogeneous and isotropic universes. This anisotropy is caused by the tidal force in the off-center region of the spherical void. Since no tidal force exists in homogeneous and isotropic universes, we may test the inhomogeneous universe by observing statistical distortion of the two-point galaxy correlation function.
  • We explore the collision between two concentric spherical thin shells. The inner shell is charged, whereas the outer one is either neutral or charged. In the situation we consider, the charge of the inner shell is larger than its gravitational mass, and the inside of it is empty and regular. Hence the domain just outside it is described by the overcharged Reissner-Nordstrom geometry whereas the inside of it is Minkowski. First, the inner shell starts to shrink form infinity with finite kinetic energy, and then the outer shell starts to shrink from infinity with vanishing kinetic energy. The inner shell bounces on the potential wall and collides with the ingoing outer shell. The energy of collision between these shells at "their center of mass frame" does not exceed the total energy of the system. By contrast, by virtue of the very large gamma factor of the relative velocity of the shells, the energy of collision between two of the constituent particles of these shells at their center of mass frame can be much larger than the Planck scale. This result suggests that the black hole or naked singularity is not necessary for ultra-high energy collision of particles.
  • We explore the Reissner-Nordstr\"{o}m naked singularities with a charge $Q$ larger than its mass $M$ from the perspective of the particle acceleration. We first consider a collision between two test particles following the radial geodesics in the Reissner-Nordstr\"{o}m naked singular geometry. An initially radially ingoing particle turns back due to the repulsive effect of gravity in the vicinity of naked singularity. Such a particle then collides with an another radially ingoing particle. We show that the center of mass energy of collision taking place at $r \approx M$ is unbound, in the limit where the charge transcends the mass by arbitrarily small amount $0<1-M/Q\ll1$.The acceleration process we described avoids fine tuning of the parameters of the particle geodesics for the unbound center of mass energy of collisions and the proper time required for the process is also finite. We show that the coordinate time required for the trans-Plankian collision to occur around one solar mass naked singularity is around million years while it is many orders of magnitude larger than Hubble time in the black hole case. We then study the collision of the neutral spherically symmetric shells made up of dust particles. In this case, it is possible to treat the situation by exactly taking into account the gravity due to the shells using Israel`s thin shell formalism, and thus this treatment allows us to go beyond the test particle approximation. The center of mass energy of collision of the shells is then calculated in a situation analogous to the test particle case and is shown to be bounded above. However, we find thatthe energy of a collision between two of constituent particles of the shells at the center of mass frame can exceed the Planck energy.
  • We numerically construct an one-parameter family of initial data of an expanding inhomogeneous universe model which is composed of regularly aligned black holes with an identical mass. They are initial data for vacuum solutions of the Einstein equations. We call this universe model the "black hole universe" and analyze the structure of these initial data. We study the relation between the mean expansion rate of the 3-space, which corresponds to the Hubble parameter, and the mass density of black holes. The result implies that the same relation as that of the Einstein-de Sitter universe is realized in the limit of the large separation between neighboring black holes. The applicability of the cosmological Newtonian $N$-body simulation to the dark matter composed of black holes is also discussed. The deviation of the spatial metric of the cosmological Newtonian $N$-body system from that of the black hole universe is found to be smaller than about 1% in a region distant from the particles, if the separation length between neighboring particles is 20 times larger than their gravitational radius. By contrast, the deviation of the square of the Hubble parameter of the cosmological Newtonian $N$-body system from that of the black hole universe is about 20% for the same separation length.
  • We study the evolution of linear density perturbations in a large spherical void universe which accounts for the acceleration of the cosmic volume expansion without introducing dark energy. The density contrast of this void is not large within the light cone of an observer at the center of the void. Therefore, we describe the void structure as a perturbation with a dimensionless small parameter $\kappa$ in a homogeneous and isotropic universe within the region observable for the observer. We introduce additional anisotropic perturbations with a dimensionless small parameter $\epsilon$, whose evolution is of interest. Then, we solve perturbation equations up to order $\kappa \epsilon$ by applying second-order perturbation theory in the homogeneous and isotropic universe model. By this method, we can know the evolution of anisotropic perturbations affected by the void structure. We show that the growth rate of the anisotropic density perturbations in the large void universe is significantly different from that in the homogeneous and isotropic universe. This result suggests that the observation of the distribution of galaxies may give a strong constraint on the large void universe model.
  • We give a perturbative analysis for an infinitesimally thin cylindrical shell composed of counter rotating collisionless particles, originally devised by Apostolatos and Thorne. They found a static solution of the shell and concluded by C-energy argument that it is stable. Recently, the present authors and Ida reanalyzed this system by evaluating the C-energy on the future null infinity and found that the system has an instability, though it was not shown how the system is unstable. In this paper, it is shown in the framework of the linear perturbation theory that, if the constituent particles move slowly, the static shell is unstable in the sense that the perturbation of its circumferential radius oscillates with exponentially growing amplitude, whereas if the speed of the constituent particle exceeds a critical value, the shell just expands or contracts exponentially with time.
  • We explore equilibrium solutions of non-topological solitons in a general class of scalar field theories which include global U(1) symmetry. We find new types of solutions, tube-shaped and crust-shaped objects, and investigate their stability. Like Q-balls, the new solitons can exist in supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, which may responsible for baryon asymmetry and dark matter. Therefore, observational signals of the new solitons would give us more informations on the early universe and supersymmetric theories.
  • It may be widely believed that probing short-distance physics is limited by the presence of the Planck energy scale above which scale any information is cloaked behind a horizon. If this hypothesis is correct, we could observe quantum behavior of gravity only through a black hole of Planck mass. We numerically show that in a scattering of two black holes in the 5-dimensional spacetime, a visible domain, whose curvature radius is much shorter than the Planck length, can be formed. Our result indicates that super-Planckian phenomena may be observed without an obstruction by horizon formation in particle accelerators.
  • Recently, Banados, Silk and West (BSW) showed that the total energy of two colliding test particles has no upper limit in their center of mass frame in the neighborhood of an extreme Kerr black hole, even if these particles were at rest at infinity in the infinite past. We call this mechanism the BSW mechanism or BSW process. The large energy of such particles would generate strong gravity, although this has not been taken into account in the BSW analysis. A similar mechanism is seen in the collision of two spherical test shells in the neighborhood of an extreme Reissner-Nordstr\"om black hole. In this paper, in order to draw some implications concerning the effects of gravity generated by colliding particles in the BSW process, we study a collision of two spherical dust shells, since their gravity can be exactly treated. We show that the energy of two colliding shells in the center of mass frame observable from infinity has an upper limit due to their own gravity. Our result suggests that an upper limit also exists for the total energy of colliding particles in the center of mass frame in the observable domain in the BSW process due the gravity of the particles.
  • It is known that the Meissner-like effect is seen in a magnetosphere without an electric current in black hole spacetime: no non-monopole component of magnetic flux penetrates the event horizon if the black hole is extreme. In this paper, in order to see how an electric current affects the Meissner-like effect, we study a force-free electromagnetic system in a static and spherically symmetric extreme black hole spacetime. By assuming that the rotational angular velocity of the magnetic field is very small, we construct a perturbative solution for the Grad-Shafranov equation, which is the basic equation to determine a stationary, axisymmetric electromagnetic field with a force-free electric current. Our perturbation analysis reveals that, if an electric current exists, higher multipole components may be superposed upon the monopole component on the event horizon, even if the black hole is extreme.