• Even with the diminished precision possible with only two reaction wheels, the Kepler spacecraft can obtain mmag level, time-resolved photometry of tens of thousands of sources. The presence of such a rich, large data set could be transformative for stellar astronomy. In this white paper, we discuss how rotation periods for a large ensemble of single and binary main- sequence dwarfs can yield a quantitative understanding of the evolution of stellar spin-down over time. This will allow us to calibrate rotation-based ages beyond ~1 Gyr, which is the oldest benchmark that exists today apart from the Sun. Measurement of rotation periods of M dwarfs past the fully-convective boundary will enable extension of gyrochronology to the end of the stellar main-sequence, yielding precise ages ({\sigma} ~10%) for the vast majority of nearby stars. It will also help set constraints on the angular momentum evolution and magnetic field generation in these stars. Our Kepler-based study would be supported by a suite of ongoing and future ground-based observations. Finally, we briefly discuss two ancillary science cases, detection of long-period low-mass eclipsing binaries and microvariability in white dwarfs and hot subdwarf B stars that the Kepler Two-Wheels Program would facilitate.
  • We present rotation periods for 71 single dwarf members of the open cluster NGC6811 determined using photometry from NASA's Kepler Mission. The results are the first from The Kepler Cluster Study which combine Kepler's photometry with ground-based spectroscopy for cluster membership and binarity. The rotation periods delineate a tight sequence in the NGC6811 color-period diagram from ~1 day at mid-F to ~11 days at early-K spectral type. This result extends to ~1 Gyr similar prior results in the ~600 Myr Hyades and Praesepe clusters, suggesting that rotation periods for cool dwarf stars delineate a well-defined surface in the 3-dimensional space of color (mass), rotation, and age. It implies that reliable ages can be derived for field dwarf stars with measured colors and rotation periods, and it promises to enable further understanding of various aspects of stellar rotation and activity for cool stars.
  • We refine the physical parameters of the transiting hot Jupiter planet XO-1b and its stellar host XO-1 using HST NICMOS observations. XO-1b has a radius Rp=1.21+/-0.03 RJup, and XO-1 has a radius Rs=0.94+/-0.02 RSun, where the uncertainty in the mass of XO-1 dominates the uncertainty of Rp and Rs. There are no significant differences in the XO-1 system properties between these broad-band NIR observations and previous determinations based upon ground-based optical observations. We measure two transit timings from these observations with 9 s and 15 s precision. As a residual to a linear ephemeris model, there is a 2.0 sigma timing difference between the two HST visits that are separated by 3 transit events (11.8 days). These two transit timings and additional timings from the literature are sufficient to rule out the presence of an Earth mass planet orbiting in 2:1 mean motion resonance coplanar with XO-1b. We identify and correct for poorly understood gain-like variations present in NICMOS time series data. This correction reduces the effective noise in time series photometry by a factor of two, for the case of XO-1.
  • The star XO-5 (GSC 02959-00729, V=12.1, G8V) hosts a Jupiter-sized, Rp=1.15+/-0.12 Rjup, transiting extrasolar planet, XO-5b, with an orbital period of P=4.187732+/-0.00002 days. The planet mass (Mp=1.15+/-0.08 Mjup) and surface gravity (gp=22+/-5 m/s^2) are significantly larger than expected by empirical Mp-P and Mp-P-[Fe/H] relationships. However, the deviation from the Mp-P relationship for XO-5b is not large enough to suggest a distinct type of planet as is suggested for GJ 436b, HAT-P-2b, and XO-3b. By coincidence XO-5 overlies the extreme H I plume that emanates from the interacting galaxy pair NGC 2444/NGC 2445 (Arp 143).
  • We report on a V=11.2 early K dwarf, XO-2 (GSC 03413-00005), that hosts a Rp=0.98+0.03/-0.01 Rjup, Mp=0.57+/-0.06 Mjup transiting extrasolar planet, XO-2b, with an orbital period of 2.615857+/-0.000005 days. XO-2 has high metallicity, [Fe/H]=0.45+/-0.02, high proper motion, mu_tot=157 mas/yr, and has a common proper motion stellar companion with 31" separation. The two stars are nearly identical twins, with very similar spectra and apparent magnitudes. Due to the high metallicity, these early K dwarf stars have a mass and radius close to solar, Ms=0.98+/-0.02 Msolar and Rs=0.97+0.02/-0.01 Rsolar. The high proper motion of XO-2 results from an eccentric orbit (Galactic pericenter, Rper<4 kpc) well confined to the Galactic disk (Zmax~100 pc). In addition, the phase space position of XO-2 is near the Hercules dynamical stream, which points to an origin of XO-2 in the metal-rich, inner Thin Disk and subsequent dynamical scattering into the solar neighborhood. We describe an efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm for calculating the Bayesian posterior probability of the system parameters from a transit light curve.
  • In this paper we present the first $BVI$ CCD photometry of six overlooked old open clusters (Berkeley 44, NGC 6827, Berkeley 52, Berkeley 56, Skiff 1 and Berkeley 5) and derive estimates of their fundamental parameters by using isochrones from the Padova library (Girardi et al. 2000). We found that all the clusters are older than the Hyades, with ages ranging from 0.8 (NGC 6827 and Berkeley 5) to 4.0 (Berkeley 56) Gyr. This latter is one of the old open clusters with the largest heliocentric distance. In the field of Skiff 1 we recognize a faint blue Main Sequence identical to the one found in the background of open clusters in the Second and Third Galactic Quadrant, and routinely attributed to the Canis Major accretion event. We use the synthetic Color Magnitude Diagram method and a Galactic model to show that this population can be easily interpreted as Thick Disk and Halo population toward Skiff 1. We finally revise the old open clusters age distribution, showing that the previously suggested peak at 5 Gyr looses importance as additional old clusters are discovered.