• Luminous high-redshift quasars can be used to probe of the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the early universe because their UV light is absorbed by the neutral hydrogen along the line of sight. They help us to measure the neutral hydrogen fraction of the high-z universe, shedding light on the end of reionization epoch. In this paper, we present a discovery of a new quasar (PSO J006.1240+39.2219) at redshift $z=6.61\pm0.02$ from Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System 1. Including this quasar, there are nine quasars above $z>6.5$ up to date. The estimated continuum brightness is $M_\text{1450}$=$-25.96\pm0.08$. PSO J006.1240+39.2219 has a strong Ly~$\alpha$ emission compared with typical low-redshift quasars, but the measured near-zone region size is $R_\text{NZ}=3.2\pm1.1$ proper megaparsecs, which is consistent with other quasars at z$\sim$6.
  • Comet C/2017 K2 (PANSTARRS) was discovered by the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Survey on 2017 May 21 at a distance 16.09 au from the Sun, the second most distant discovery of an active comet. Pre-discovery images in the PS1 archive back to 2014 and additional deep CFHT images between 2013 May 10-13 showed the comet to be active at 23.75 au. We derive an upper limit to the nucleus radius of $R_N$=80 km, assuming a 4\% albedo. The spectral reflectivity of the comet surface is similar to "fresh" regions seen on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko using the $Rosetta$ OSIRIS camera. Pre-discovery photometry combined with new data obtained with Megacam on the CFHT show that the activity is consistent with CO-ice sublimation and inconsistent with CO$_2$-ice sublimation. The ice sublimation models were run out to perihelion in 2022 at 1.8 au to predict the CO production rates, assuming that the outgassing area does not change. Assuming a canonical 4\% active surface area for water-ice sublimation, we present production rate ratios, $Q_{\rm CO}$/$Q_{\rm H2O}$, for a range of nucleus sizes. Comparing these results with other CO-rich comets we derive a lower limit to the nucleus radius of $\sim$14 km. We present predictions for $Q_{\rm CO}$ at a range of distances that will be useful for planning observations with JWST and large ground-based facilities.
  • We investigate a sample of 2293 ICRF2 extragalactic radio-loud sources with accurate positions determined by VLBI, mostly active galactic nuclei (AGN) and quasars, which are cross-matched with optical sources in the first Gaia release (Gaia DR1). The distribution of offsets between the VLBI sources and their optical counterparts is strongly non-Gaussian, with powerful wings extending beyond 1 arcsecond. Limiting our analysis to only high-confidence difference detections, we find (and publish) a list of 188 objects with normalized variances above 12 and offsets below 1 arcsecond. Pan-STARRS stacked and monochromatic images resolve some of these sources indicating the presence of double sources, confusion sources, or pronounced extended structures. Some 89 high-quality objects, however, do not show any perturbations and appear to be star-like single sources, yet displaced by multiples of the expected error from the radio-loud AGN. We conclude that a fraction of luminous AGN (more than 4%) can be physically dislodged from the optical centers of their parent galaxies.
  • We present a panoramic map of the entire Milky Way halo north of dec~-30 degrees (~30,000 deg^2), constructed by applying the matched-filter technique to the Pan-STARRS1 3Pi Survey dataset. Using single-epoch photometry reaching to g~22, we are sensitive to stellar substructures with heliocentric distances between 3.5 and ~35 kpc. We recover almost all previously-reported streams in this volume and demonstrate that several of these are significantly more extended than earlier datasets have indicated. In addition, we also report five new candidate stellar streams. One of these features appears significantly broader and more luminous than the others and is likely the remnant of a dwarf galaxy. The other four streams are consistent with a globular cluster origin, and three of these are rather short in projection (<10 degrees), suggesting that streams like Ophiuchus may not be that rare. Finally, a significant number of more marginal substructures are also revealed by our analysis; many of these features can also be discerned in matched-filter maps produced by other authors from SDSS data, and hence they are very likely to be genuine. However, the extant 3Pi data is currently too shallow to determine their properties or produce convincing CMDs. The global view of the Milky Way provided by Pan-STARRS1 provides further evidence for the important role of both globular cluster disruption and dwarf galaxy accretion in building the Milky Way's stellar halo.
  • We report on an ongoing project to investigate activity in the M dwarf stellar population observed by the Pan-STARRS 1 Medium Deep Survey (PS1-MDS). Using a custom-built pipeline, we refine an initial sample of $\approx$ 4 million sources in PS1-MDS to a sample of 184,148 candidate cool stars using color cuts. Motivated by the well-known relationship between rotation and stellar activity, we use a multi-band periodogram analysis and visual vetting to identify 271 sources that are likely rotating M dwarfs. We derive a new set of polynomials relating M dwarf PS1 colors to fundamental stellar parameters and use them to estimate the masses, distances, effective temperatures, and bolometric luminosities of our sample. We present a catalog containing these values, our measured rotation periods, and cross-matches to other surveys. Our final sample spans periods of $\lesssim$1-130 days in stars with estimated effective temperatures of $\approx$ 2700-4000 K. Twenty-two of our sources have X-ray cross-matches, and they are found to be relatively X-ray bright as would be expected from selection effects. Our data set provides evidence that Kepler-based searches have not been sensitive to very slowly-rotating stars ($P_{\rm rot} \gtrsim 70$ d), implying that the observed emergence of very slow rotators in studies of low-mass stars may be a systematic effect. We also see a lack of low-amplitude ($<$2%) variability in objects with intermediate (10-40 d) rotation periods, which, considered in conjunction with other observational results, may be a signpost of a loss of magnetic complexity associated with a phase of rapid spin-down in intermediate-age M dwarfs. This work represents just a first step in exploring stellar variability in data from the PS1-MDS and, in the farther future, LSST.
  • Substellar members of young ($\lesssim$150 Myr) moving groups are valuable benchmarks to empirically define brown dwarf evolution with age and to study the low-mass end of the initial mass function. We have combined Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) proper motions with optical$-$IR photometry from PS1, 2MASS and $\textit{WISE}$ to search for substellar members of the AB Dor Moving Group within $\approx$50 pc and with spectral types of late-M to early-L, corresponding to masses down to $\approx$30 M$_{Jup}$ at the age of the group ($\approx$125 Myr). Including both photometry and proper motions allows us to better select candidates by excluding field dwarfs whose colors are similar to young AB~Dor Moving Group members. Our near-IR spectroscopy has identified six ultracool dwarfs (M6$-$L4; $\approx$30$-$100 M$_{Jup}$) with intermediate surface gravities (INT-G) as candidate members of the AB Dor Moving Group. We find another two candidate members with spectra showing hints of youth but consistent with field gravities. We also find four field brown dwarfs unassociated with the AB Dor Moving Group, three of which have INT-G gravity classification. While signatures of youth are present in the spectra of our $\approx$125 Myr objects, neither their $J-K$ nor $W1-W2$ colors are significantly redder than field dwarfs with the same spectral types, unlike younger ultracool dwarfs. We also determined PS1 parallaxes for eight of our candidates and one previously identified AB Dor Moving Group candidate. Although radial velocities (and parallaxes, for some) are still needed to fully assess membership, these new objects provide valuable insight into the spectral characteristics and evolution of young brown dwarfs.
  • The Time-Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) is an SDSS-IV eBOSS subproject primarily aimed at obtaining identification spectra of ~220,000 optically-variable objects systematically selected from SDSS/Pan-STARRS1 multi-epoch imaging. We present a preview of the science enabled by TDSS, based on TDSS spectra taken over ~320 deg^2 of sky as part of the SEQUELS survey in SDSS-III, which is in part a pilot survey for eBOSS in SDSS-IV. Using the 15,746 TDSS-selected single-epoch spectra of photometrically variable objects in SEQUELS, we determine the demographics of our variability-selected sample, and investigate the unique spectral characteristics inherent in samples selected by variability. We show that variability-based selection of quasars complements color-based selection by selecting additional redder quasars, and mitigates redshift biases to produce a smooth quasar redshift distribution over a wide range of redshifts. The resulting quasar sample contains systematically higher fractions of blazars and broad absorption line quasars than from color-selected samples. Similarly, we show that M-dwarfs in the TDSS-selected stellar sample have systematically higher chromospheric active fractions than the underlying M-dwarf population, based on their H-alpha emission. TDSS also contains a large number of RR Lyrae and eclipsing binary stars with main-sequence colors, including a few composite-spectrum binaries. Finally, our visual inspection of TDSS spectra uncovers a significant number of peculiar spectra, and we highlight a few cases of these interesting objects. With a factor of ~15 more spectra, the main TDSS survey in SDSS-IV will leverage the lessons learned from these early results for a variety of time-domain science applications.
  • We present the first spectroscopic analysis of the faint and compact stellar system Draco II (Dra II, M_V=-2.9+/-0.8, r_h=19^{+8}_{-6} pc), recently discovered in the Pan-STARRS1 3{\pi} survey. The observations, conducted with DEIMOS on the Keck II telescope, establish some of its basic characteristics: the velocity data reveal a narrow peak with 9 member stars at a systemic heliocentric velocity <v_r>=-347.6^{+1.7}_{-1.8} km/s, thereby confirming Dra II is a satellite of the Milky Way; we infer a velocity dispersion with \sigma_{vr}=2.9+/-2.1 km/s (<8.4 km/s at the 95% confidence level), which implies log_{10}(M_{1/2})=5.5^{+0.4}_{-0.6} and log_{10}((M/L)_{1/2})=2.7^{+0.5}_{-0.8}, in Solar units; furthermore, very weak Calcium triplet lines in the spectra of the high signal-to-noise member stars imply [Fe/H]<-2.1, whilst variations in the line strengths of two stars with similar colours and magnitudes suggest a metallicity spread in Dra II. These new data cannot clearly discriminate whether Draco II is a star cluster or amongst the faintest, most compact, and closest dwarf galaxies. However, the sum of the three --- individually inconclusive --- pieces of evidence presented here, seems to favour the dwarf galaxy interpretation.
  • We present a recalibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry with new flat fields and zero points derived from Pan-STARRS1 (PS1). Using PSF photometry of 60 million stars with $16 < r < 20$, we derive a model of amplifier gain and flat-field corrections with per-run RMS residuals of 3 millimagnitudes (mmag) in $griz$ bands and 15 mmag in $u$ band. The new photometric zero points are adjusted to leave the median in the Galactic North unchanged for compatibility with previous SDSS work. We also identify transient non-photometric periods in SDSS ("contrails") based on photometric deviations co-temporal in SDSS bands. The recalibrated stellar PSF photometry of SDSS and PS1 has an RMS difference of {9,7,7,8} mmag in $griz$, respectively, when averaged over $15'$ regions.
  • We present the discovery of three new Milky Way satellites from our search for compact stellar overdensities in the photometric catalog of the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS 1, or PS1) 3pi survey. The first satellite, Laevens 3, is located at a heliocentric distance of d=67+/-3 kpc. With a total magnitude of Mv=-4.4+/-0.3 and a half-light radius rh=7+/-2 pc, its properties resemble those of outer halo globular clusters. The second system, Draco II/Laevens 4 (Dra II), is a closer and fainter satellite (d~20 kpc, Mv =-2.9+/-0.8), whose uncertain size (rh = 19 +8/-6 pc) renders its classification difficult without kinematic information; it could either be a faint and extended globular cluster or a faint and compact dwarf galaxy. The third satellite, Sagittarius II/Laevens 5 (Sgr II), has an ambiguous nature as it is either the most compact dwarf galaxy or the most extended globular cluster in its luminosity range (rh = 37 +9/-8 pc and Mv=-5.2+/-0.4). At a heliocentric distance of 67+/-5 kpc, this satellite lies intriguingly close to the expected location of the trailing arm of the Sagittarius stellar stream behind the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Sgr dSph). If confirmed through spectroscopic follow up, this connection would locate this part of the trailing arm of the Sagittarius stellar stream that has so far gone undetected. It would further suggest that Sgr II was brought into the Milky Way halo as a satellite of the Sgr dSph.
  • We present the discovery of a faint Milky Way satellite, Laevens 2/Triangulum II, found in the Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS 1) 3 pi imaging data and confirmed with follow-up wide-field photometry from the Large Binocular Cameras. The stellar system, with an absolute magnitude of M_V=-1.8 +/-0.5, a heliocentric distance of 30 +2/-2 kpc, and a half-mass radius of 34 +9/-8 pc, shows remarkable similarity to faint, nearby, small satellites such as Willman 1, Segue 1, Segue 2, and Bo\"otes II. The discovery of Laevens 2/Triangulum II further populates the region of parameter space for which the boundary between dwarf galaxies and globular clusters becomes tenuous. Follow-up spectroscopy will ultimately determine the nature of this new satellite, whose spatial location hints at a possible connection with the complex Triangulum-Andromeda stellar structures.
  • We analyze 760475 observations of 333026 main-belt objects obtained by the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) survey telescope between 2012 May 20 and 2013 November 9, a period during which PS1 discovered two main-belt comets, P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS) and P/2013 R3 (Catalina-PANSTARRS). PS1 comet detection procedures currently consist of the comparison of the point spread functions (PSFs) of moving objects to those of reference stars, and the flagging of objects that show anomalously large radial PSF widths. Based on the number of missed discovery opportunities among comets discovered by other observers, we estimate an upper limit comet discovery efficiency rate of ~70% for PS1. Additional analyses that could improve comet discovery yields in future surveys include linear PSF analysis, modeling of trailed stellar PSFs for comparison to trailed moving object PSFs, searches for azimuthally localized activity, comparison of point-source-optimized photometry to extended-source-optimized photometry, searches for photometric excesses in objects with known absolute magnitudes, and crowd-sourcing. Analysis of PS1 survey statistics indicates an expected fraction of 59 MBCs per 10^6 outer main-belt asteroids, and a 95% confidence upper limit of 96 MBCs per 10^6 outer main-belt asteroids. We note that more sensitive future surveys could detect many more MBCs than estimated here. We find an excess of high eccentricities (0.1 < e < 0.3) among all known MBCs relative to the background asteroid population. Theoretical calculations show that, given these eccentricities, the sublimation rate for a typical MBC is orders of magnitude larger at perihelion than at aphelion, providing a plausible physical explanation for the observed behavior of MBCs peaking in observed activity strength near perihelion.
  • We present Keck II/DEIMOS spectroscopy of the three distant dwarf galaxies of M31 Lacerta I, Cassiopeia III, and Perseus I, recently discovered within the Pan-STARRS1 3\pi imaging survey. The systemic velocities of the three systems (v_{r,helio} = -198.4 +/- 1.1 km/s, -371.6 +/- 0.7 km/s, and -326 +/- 3 km/s, respectively) confirm that they are satellites of M31. In the case of Lacerta I and Cassiopeia III, the high quality of the data obtained for 126 and 212 member stars, respectively, yields reliable constraints on their global velocity dispersions (\sigma_{vr} = 10.3 +/- 0.9 km/s and 8.4 +/- 0.6 km/s, respectively), leading to dynamical-mass estimates for both of ~4x10^7 Msun within their half-light radius. These translate to V-band mass-to-light ratios of 15^{+12}_{-9} and 8^{+9}_{-5} in solar units. We also use our spectroscopic data to determine the average metallicity of the 3 dwarf galaxies ([Fe/H] = -2.0 +/- 0.1, -1.7 +/- 0.1, and -2.0 +/- 0.2, respectively). All these properties are typical of dwarf galaxy satellites of Andromeda with their luminosity and size.
  • We present a panoptic view of the stellar structure in the Galactic disk's outer reaches commonly known as the Monoceros Ring, based on data from Pan-STARRS1. These observations clearly show the large extent of the stellar overdensities on both sides of the Galactic disk, extending between b = -25 and b = +35 degrees and covering over 130 degrees in Galactic longitude. The structure exhibits a complex morphology with both stream-like features and a sharp edge to the structure in both the north and the south. We compare this map to mock observations of two published simulations aimed at explaining such structures in the outer stellar disk, one postulating an origin as a tidal stream and the other demonstrating a scenario where the disk is strongly distorted by the accretion of a satellite. These morphological comparisons of simulations can link formation scenarios to observed structures, such as demonstrating that the distorted-disk model can produce thin density features resembling tidal streams. Although neither model produces perfect agreement with the observations--the tidal stream predicts material at larger distances which is not detected while in the distorted disk model the midplane is warped to an excessive degree--future tuning of the models to accommodate these latest data may yield better agreement.
  • We report the discovery of a thin stellar stream found in Pan-STARRS1 photometry near the Galactic bulge in the constellation of Ophiuchus. It appears as a coherent structure in the colour-selected stellar density maps produced to search for tidal debris around nearby globular clusters. The stream is exceptionally short and narrow; it is about 2.5{\deg} long and 6' wide in projection. The colour-magnitude diagram of this object, which harbours a blue horizontal-branch, is consistent with an old and relatively metal-poor population ([Fe/H]~-1.3) located 9.5 +/- 0.9 kpc away at (l,b) ~ (5{\deg},+32{\deg}), and 5.0 +/- 1.0 kpc from the Galactic centre. These properties argue for a globular cluster as progenitor. The finding of such a prominent, nearby stream suggests that many streams could await discovery in the more densely populated regions of our Galaxy.
  • We present the fiducial sequences of a sample of Galactic star clusters in the five bands of the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) photometric system (g_P1, r_P1, i_P1, z_P1, y_P1). These empirical sequences -- which include the red giant and sub-giant branches, the main sequence, and the horizontal branch -- were defined from deep colour-magnitude diagrams reaching below the oldest main-sequence turn-offs of 13 globular and 3 old open clusters covering a wide range of metallicities (-2.4 < [Fe/H] < +0.4). We find excellent agreement for the nine clusters in common with previous studies in similar photometric systems when transformed to the PS1 system. Because the photometric and spectroscopic properties of these stellar populations are accurately known, the fiducials provide a solid basis for the interpretation of observations in the PS1 system, as well as valuable constraints to improve the empirical colour--$T_{eff}$ relations.
  • We present a new satellite in the outer halo of the Galaxy, the first Milky Way satellite found in the stacked photometric catalog of the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS1) Survey. From follow-up photometry obtained with WFI on the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope, we argue that the object, located at a heliocentric distance of 145+/-17 kpc, is the most distant Milky Way globular cluster yet known. With a total magnitude of M_V=-4.3+/-0.2 and a half-light radius of 20+/-2 pc, it shares the properties of extended globular clusters found in the outer halo of our Galaxy and the Andromeda galaxy. The discovery of this distant cluster shows that the full spatial extent of the Milky Way globular cluster system has not yet been fully explored.
  • We present a method to infer reddenings and distances to stars, based only on their broad-band photometry, and show how this method can be used to produce a three-dimensional dust map of the Galaxy. Our method samples from the full probability density function of distance, reddening and stellar type for individual stars, as well as the full uncertainty in reddening as a function of distance in the 3D dust map. We incorporate prior knowledge of the distribution of stars in the Galaxy and the detection limits of the survey. For stars in the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) 3 pi survey, we demonstrate that our reddening estimates are unbiased, and accurate to ~0.13 mag in E(B-V) for the typical star. Based on comparisons with mock catalogs, we expect distances for main-sequence stars to be constrained to within ~20% - 60%, although this range can vary, depending on the reddening of the star, the precise stellar type and its position on the sky. A further paper will present a 3D map of dust over the three quarters of the sky surveyed by PS1. Both the individual stellar inferences and the 3D dust map will enable a wealth of Galactic science in the plane. The method we present is not limited to the passbands of the PS1 survey, but may be extended to incorporate photometry from other surveys, such as 2MASS, SDSS (where available), and in the future, LSST and Gaia.
  • We measure the angular clustering of 33 415 extremely red objects (EROs) in the Elais-N1 field covering 5.33 deg$^{2}$, which cover the redshift range $z=0.8$ to $2$. This sample was made by merging the UKIDSS Deep eXtragalactic Survey (DXS) with the optical Subaru and Pan-STARRS PS1 datasets. We confirm the existence of a clear break in the angular correlation function at $\sim 0.02^{\circ}$ corresponding to $1 h^{-1}$ Mpc at $z\sim1$. We find that redder or brighter EROs are more clustered than bluer or fainter ones. Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model fits imply that the average mass of dark matter haloes which host EROs is over $10^{13} h^{-1} M_{\odot}$ and that EROs have a bias ranging from 2.7 to 3.5. Compared to EROs at $z\sim1.1$, at $z\sim1.5$ EROs have a higher bias and fewer are expected to be satellite galaxies. Furthermore, EROs reside in similar dark matter haloes to those that host $10^{11.0} M_{\odot}<M_{*}<10^{11.5} M_{\odot}$ galaxies. We compare our new measurement and HOD fits with the predictions of the GALFORM semi-analytical galaxy formation model. Overall, the clustering predicted by GALFORM gives an encouraging match to our results. However, compared to our deductions from the measurements, GALFORM puts EROs into lower mass haloes and predicts that a larger fraction of EROs are satellite galaxies. This suggests that the treatment of gas cooling may need to be revised in the model. Our analysis illustrates the potential of clustering analyses to provide observational constraints on theoretical models of galaxy formation.
  • We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Perseus I/Andromeda XXXIII, found in the vicinity of Andromeda (M31) in stacked imaging data from the Pan-STARRS1 3{\pi} survey. Located 27.9{\deg} away from M31, Perseus I has a heliocentric distance of 785 +/- 65 kpc, compatible with it being a satellite of M31 at 374 +14/-10 kpc from its host. The properties of Perseus I are typical for a reasonably bright dwarf galaxy (M_V = -10.3 +/- 0.7), with an exponential half-light radius of r_h = 1.7 +/- 0.4 arcminutes or r_h = 400 +105/-85 pc at this distance, and a moderate ellipticity (\epsilon = 0.43 +0.15/-0.17). The late discovery of Perseus I is due to its fairly low surface brightness (\mu_0=25.7 +1.0/-0.9 mag/arcsec^2), and to the previous lack of deep, high quality photometric data in this region. If confirmed to be a companion of M31, the location of Perseus I, far east from its host, could place interesting constraints on the bulk motion of the satellite system of M31.
  • We have combined optical and NIR photometry from Pan-STARRS 1 and UKIDSS to search the young (5-10 Myr) star-forming region of Upper Scorpius for wide (~400-4000 AU) substellar companions down to ~5 Mjup. Our search is ~4mag deeper than previous work based on 2MASS. We identified several candidates around known stellar members using a combination of color selection and spectral energy distribution fitting. Our followup spectroscopy has identified two new companions as well as confirmed two companions previously identified from photometry, with spectral types of M7.5-M9 and masses of ~15-60 Mjup, indicating a frequency for such wide substellar companions of ~0.6+/-0.3%. Both USco1610-1913B and USco1612-1800B are more luminous than expected for their spectral type compared with known members of Upper Sco. HIP77900B has an extreme mass ratio (M2/M1~0.005) and an extreme separation of 3200 AU. USco1602-2401B also has a very large separation of 1000 AU. We have also confirmed a low-mass stellar companion, USco1610-2502B (730AU, M5.5). Our substellar companions appear both non-coeval with their primary stars according to evolutionary models and, as a group, are systematically more luminous than the Upper Sco cluster sequence. One possible reason for these luminosity discrepancies could be different formation processes or accretion histories for these objects.
  • We report the discovery of two new dwarf galaxies, Lacerta I/Andromeda XXXI (Lac I/And XXXI) and Cassiopeia III/Andromeda XXXII (Cas III/And XXXII), in stacked Pan-STARRS1 r_P1- and i_P1-band imaging data. Both are luminous systems (M_V ~ -12) located at projected distances of 20.3{\deg} and 10.5{\deg} from M31. Lac I and Cas III are likely satellites of the Andromeda galaxy with heliocentric distances of 756^{+44}_{-28} kpc and 772^{+61}_{-56} kpc, respectively, and corresponding M31-centric distances of 275+/-7 kpc and 144^{+6}_{-4} kpc . The brightest of recent Local Group member discoveries, these two new dwarf galaxies owe their late discovery to their large sizes (r_h = 4.2^{+0.4}_{-0.5} arcmin or 912^{+124}_{-93} pc for Lac I; r_h = 6.5^{+1.2}_{-1.0} arcmin or 1456+/-267 pc for Cas III), and consequently low surface brightness (\mu_0 ~ 26.0 mag/arcsec^2), as well as to the lack of a systematic survey of regions at large radii from M31, close to the Galactic plane. This latter limitation is now alleviated by the 3{\pi} Pan-STARRS1 survey, which could lead to the discovery of other distant Andromeda satellite dwarf galaxies.
  • Motivated by the recognition that variation in the optical transmission of the atmosphere is probably the main limitation to the precision of ground-based CCD measurements of celestial fluxes, we review the physical processes that attenuate the passage of light through the Earth's atmosphere. The next generation of astronomical surveys, such as PanSTARRS and LSST, will greatly benefit from dedicated apparatus to obtain atmospheric transmission data that can be associated with each survey image. We review and compare various approaches to this measurement problem, including photometry, spectroscopy, and LIDAR. In conjunction with careful measurements of instrumental throughput, atmospheric transmission measurements should allow next-generation imaging surveys to produce photometry of unprecedented precision. Our primary concerns are the real-time determination of aerosol scattering and absorption by water along the line of sight, both of which can vary over the course of a night's observations.
  • Galaxy interactions are known to trigger starbursts. The young star clusters formed in mergers may be young globular clusters. The ages of these young star clusters yield the timing of interaction-triggered star formation and provide an important way to reconstruct the history of merging galaxies. Here we present the first results from our investigation into age and metallicity of twelve young clusters in the merging galaxy pair NGC 4676, using spectra from the multi-object Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) on Keck. For ten clusters, comparison of the Balmer emission lines with model equivalent widths (EWs) yields ages less than 10 Myr. Two spectra display Balmer absorption lines typical of star clusters dominated by A-type stars, with estimated ages of about 170 Myr. These ages are comparable to the dynamical age of the tidal tails and are consistent with star formation triggered during the first passage of the pair. The locations of these two clusters in the tidal tails are generally consistent with predictions of shock-induced star formation models. One of these older objects appears unresolved on the image and is luminous enough to qualify as a young globular cluster. Using EWs of the diagnostic lines [OII] and [OIII], we obtain oxygen abundances in the range 7.3 < 12+log(O/H) < 9.0. These values show a nearly flat distribution along the northern tail, suggesting efficient gas mixing in the tail.