• We present a multi-component structural analysis of the internal structure of $1074$ high redshift massive galaxies at $1<z<3$ from the CANDELS HST Survey. In particular we examine galaxies best-fit by two structural components, and thus likely forming discs and bulges. We examine the stellar mass, star formation rates, and colours of both the inner `bulge' and outer `disc' components for these systems using SED information from the resolved ACS+WFC3 HST imaging. We find that the majority of both inner and outer components lie in the star-forming region of UVJ space ($68$ and $90$ per cent respectively). However, the inner portions, or the likely forming bulges, are dominated by dusty star formation. Furthermore, we show that the outer components of these systems have a higher star formation rate than their inner regions, and the ratio of star formation rate between `disc' and `bulge' increases at lower redshifts. Despite the higher star formation rate of the outer component, the stellar mass ratio of inner to outer component remains constant through this epoch. This suggests that there is mass transfer from the outer to inner components for typical two component forming systems, thus building bulges from disks. Finally, using Chandra data we find that the presence of an AGN is more common in both $1$-component spheroid-like galaxies and $2$-component systems ($13\pm3$ and $11\pm2$ per cent) than in $1$-component disc-like galaxies ($3\pm1$ per cent), demonstrating that the formation of a central inner-component likely triggers the formation of central massive black holes in these galaxies.
  • The evolution of the number density of galaxies in the universe, and thus also the total number of galaxies, is a fundamental question with implications for a host of astrophysical problems including galaxy evolution and cosmology. However there has never been a detailed study of this important measurement, nor a clear path to answer it. To address this we use observed galaxy stellar mass functions up to $z\sim8$ to determine how the number densities of galaxies changes as a function of time and mass limit. We show that the increase in the total number density of galaxies ($\phi_{\rm T}$), more massive than M$_{*} = 10^{6}$ M_0, decreases as $\phi_{\rm T} \sim t^{-1}$, where $t$ is the age of the universe. We further show that this evolution turns-over and rather increases with time at higher mass lower limits of M$_{*}>10^{7}$ M_0. By using the M$_{*}=10^{6}$ M_0 lower limit we further show that the total number of galaxies in the universe up to $z = 8$ is $2.0^{+0.7}_{-0.6} \times 10^{12}$ (two trillion), almost a factor of ten higher than would be seen in an all sky survey at Hubble Ultra-Deep Field depth. We discuss the implications for these results for galaxy evolution, as well as compare our results with the latest models of galaxy formation. These results also reveal that the cosmic background light in the optical and near-infrared likely arise from these unobserved faint galaxies. We also show how these results solve the question of why the sky at night is dark, otherwise known as Olbers' paradox.
  • We examine a sample of 1495 galaxies in the CANDELS fields to determine the evolution of two component galaxies, including bulges and discs, within massive galaxies at the epoch 1 < z < 3 when the Hubble sequence forms. We fit all of our galaxies' light profiles with a single S\'ersic fit, as well as with a combination of exponential and S\'ersic profiles. The latter is done in order to describe a galaxy with an inner and an outer component, or bulge and disc component. We develop and use three classification methods (visual, F-test and the RFF) to separate our sample into 1-component galaxies (disc/spheroids-like galaxies) and 2-component galaxies (galaxies formed by an 'inner part' or bulge and an 'outer part' or disc). We then compare the results from using these three different ways to classify our galaxies. We find that the fraction of galaxies selected as 2-component galaxies increases on average 50 per cent from the lowest mass bin to the most massive galaxies, and decreases with redshift by a factor of four from z = 1 to z = 3. We find that single S\'ersic 'disc-like' galaxies have the highest relative number densities at all redshifts, and that 2-component galaxies have the greatest increase and become at par with S\'ersic discs by z = 1. We also find that the systems we classify as 2-component galaxies have an increase in the sizes of their outer components, or 'discs', by about a factor of three from z = 3 to z = 1.5, while the inner components or 'bulges' stay roughly the same size. This suggests that these systems are growing from the inside out, whilst the bulges or protobulges are in place early in the history of these galaxies. This is also seen to a lesser degree in the growth of single 'disc-like' galaxies vs. 'spheroid-like' galaxies over the same epoch.
  • Dust attenuation affects nearly all observational aspects of galaxy evolution, yet very little is known about the form of the dust-attenuation law in the distant Universe. Here, we model the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies at z = 1.5--3 from CANDELS with rest-frame UV to near-IR imaging under different assumptions about the dust law, and compare the amount of inferred attenuated light with the observed infrared (IR) luminosities. Some individual galaxies show strong Bayesian evidence in preference of one dust law over another, and this preference agrees with their observed location on the plane of infrared excess (IRX, $L_{\text{TIR}}/L_{\text{UV}}$) and UV slope ($\beta$). We generalize the shape of the dust law with an empirical model, $A_{\lambda,\delta}=E(B-V)\ k_\lambda\ (\lambda/\lambda_V)^\delta$ where $k_\lambda$ is the dust law of Calzetti et al. (2000), and show that there exists a correlation between the color excess ${E(B-V)}$ and tilt $\delta$ with ${\delta=(0.62\pm0.05)\log(E(B-V))}$+ ${(0.26~\pm~0.02)}$. Galaxies with high color excess have a shallower, starburst-like law, and those with low color excess have a steeper, SMC-like law. Surprisingly, the galaxies in our sample show no correlation between the shape of the dust law and stellar mass, star-formation rate, or $\beta$. The change in the dust law with color excess is consistent with a model where attenuation is caused by by scattering, a mixed star-dust geometry, and/or trends with stellar population age, metallicity, and dust grain size. This rest-frame UV-to-near-IR method shows potential to constrain the dust law at even higher ($z>3$) redshifts.
  • Due to significant galaxy contamination and impurity in stellar mass selected samples (up to 95% from z=0-3), we examine the star formation history, quenching time-scales, and structural evolution of galaxies using a constant number density selection with data from the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey field. Using this methodology we investigate the evolution of galaxies at a variety of number densities from $z=0-3$. We find that samples chosen at number densities ranging from $3\times10^{-4}$ to 10$^{-5}$ galaxies Mpc$^{-3}$ (corresponding to $z\sim0.5$ stellar masses of M$_{*}= 10^{10.95-11.6}$ M$_{0}$) have a star forming blue fraction of $\sim50$\% at $z\sim2.5$, which evolves to a nearly $100$\% quenched red and dead population by $z\sim 1$. We also see evidence for number density downsizing, such that the galaxies selected at the lowest densities (highest masses) become a homogeneous red population before those at higher number densities. Examining the evolution of the colours for these systems furthermore shows that the formation redshift of galaxies selected at these number densities is $z_{\rm form}>3$. The structural evolution through size and Sersic index fits reveal that while there remains evolution in terms of galaxies becoming larger and more concentrated in stellar mass at lower redshifts, the magnitude of the change is significantly smaller than for a mass selected sample. We also find that changes in size and structure continues at $z < 1$, and is coupled strongly to passivity evolution. We conclude that galaxy structure is driving the quenching of galaxies, such that galaxies become concentrated before they become passive.
  • With a large sample of bright, low-redshift galaxies with optical$-$near-IR imaging from the GAMA survey we use bulge-disc decompositions to understand the wavelength-dependent behavior of single-S\'ersic structural measurements. We denote the variation in single-S\'ersic index with wavelength as $\mathcal{N}$, likewise for effective radius we use $\mathcal{R}$. We find that most galaxies with a substantial disc, even those with no discernable bulge, display a high value of $\mathcal{N}$. The increase in S\'ersic index to longer wavelengths is therefore intrinsic to discs, apparently resulting from radial variations in stellar population and/or dust reddening. Similarly, low values of $\mathcal{R}$ ($<$ 1) are found to be ubiquitous, implying an element of universality in galaxy colour gradients. We also study how bulge and disc colour distributions vary with galaxy type. We find that, rather than all bulges being red and all discs being blue in absolute terms, both components become redder for galaxies with redder total colours. We even observe that bulges in bluer galaxies are typically bluer than discs in red galaxies, and that bulges and discs are closer in colour for fainter galaxies. Trends in total colour are therefore not solely due to the colour or flux dominance of the bulge or disc.
  • We present a new analysis of the ionizing emissivity ($\dot{N}_{\rm{ion}}$, s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-3}$) for galaxies during the epoch of reionization and their potential for completing and maintaining reionization. We use extensive SED modelling -- incorporating two plausible mechanisms for the escape of Lyman continuum photon -- to explore the range and evolution of ionizing efficiencies consistent with new results on galaxy colours ($\beta$) during this epoch. We estimate $\dot{N}_{\rm{ion}}$ for the latest observations of the luminosity and star-formation rate density at $z<10$, outlining the range of emissivity histories consistent with our new model. Given the growing observational evidence for a UV colour-magnitude relation in high-redshift galaxies, we find that for any plausible evolution in galaxy properties, red (brighter) galaxies are less efficient at producing ionizing photons than their blue (fainter) counterparts. The assumption of a redshift and luminosity evolution in $\beta$ leads to two important conclusions. Firstly, the ionizing efficiency of galaxies naturally increases with redshift. Secondly, for a luminosity dependent ionizing efficiency, we find that galaxies down to a rest-frame magnitude of $M_{\rm{UV}} \approx -15$ alone can potentially produce sufficient numbers of ionizing photons to maintain reionization as early as $z\sim8$ for a clumping factor of $C_{\rm{H {\small II}}} \leq 3$.
  • We measure new estimates for the galaxy stellar mass function and star formation rates for samples of galaxies at $z \sim 4,~5,~6~\&~7$ using data in the CANDELS GOODS South field. The deep near-infrared observations allow us to construct the stellar mass function at $z \geq 6$ directly for the first time. We estimate stellar masses for our sample by fitting the observed spectral energy distributions with synthetic stellar populations, including nebular line and continuum emission. The observed UV luminosity functions for the samples are consistent with previous observations, however we find that the observed $M_{UV}$ - M$_{*}$ relation has a shallow slope more consistent with a constant mass to light ratio and a normalisation which evolves with redshift. Our stellar mass functions have steep low-mass slopes ($\alpha \approx -1.9$), steeper than previously observed at these redshifts and closer to that of the UV luminosity function. Integrating our new mass functions, we find the observed stellar mass density evolves from $\log_{10} \rho_{*} = 6.64^{+0.58}_{-0.89}$ at $z \sim 7$ to $7.36\pm0.06$ $\text{M}_{\odot} \text{Mpc}^{-3}$ at $z \sim 4$. Finally, combining the measured UV continuum slopes ($\beta$) with their rest-frame UV luminosities, we calculate dust corrected star-formation rates (SFR) for our sample. We find the specific star-formation rate for a fixed stellar mass increases with redshift whilst the global SFR density falls rapidly over this period. Our new SFR density estimates are higher than previously observed at this redshift.
  • In this paper we present a detailed study of the structures and morphologies of a sample of 1188 massive galaxies with Mstar>10^10Msun between redshifts z=1-3 within the Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) region of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) field. Using this sample we determine how galaxy structure and morphology evolve with time. We visually classify our sample into disks, ellipticals and peculiar systems and correct for redshift effects on our classifications through simulations. We find evolution in the fractions of galaxies at a given visual classification as a function of redshift. The peculiar population is dominant at z>2 with a substantial spheroid population, and a negligible disk population. We compute the transition redshift, ztrans, where the combined fraction of spheroids and disks is equal to that of peculiar galaxies, as ztrans=1.86+/-0.62 for galaxies in our stellar mass range. We find that this changes as a function of stellar mass, with Hubble-type systems becoming dominant at higher redshifts for higher mass galaxies (ztrans=2.22+/-0.82), than for the lower mass galaxies (ztrans=1.73+/-0.57). Higher mass galaxies become morphologically settled before their lower mass counterparts, a form of morphological downsizing. We furthermore compare our visual classifications with Sersic index, the concentration, asymmetry and clumpiness (CAS) parameters, star formation rate and rest frame U-B colour. We find links between the colour of a galaxy, its star formation rate and how extended or peculiar it appears. Finally, we discuss the negligible z>2 disk fraction based on visual morphologies and speculate that this is an effect of forming disks appearing peculiar through processes such as violent disk instabilities or mergers. We conclude that to properly define high redshift morphology a new and more exact classification scheme is needed.
  • The ability to resolve all processes which drive galaxy formation is one of the most fundamental goals in extragalactic astronomy. While star formation rates and the merger history are now measured with increasingly high certainty, the role of gas accretion from the intergalactic medium in supplying gas for star formation still remains largely unknown. We present in this paper indirect evidence for the accretion of gas into massive galaxies with initial stellar masses M_*>10^{11} M_sol and following the same merger adjusted co-moving number density at lower redshifts during the epoch 1.5 < z < 3, using results from the GOODS NICMOS Survey (GNS). We show that the measured gas mass fractions of these massive galaxies are inconsistent with the observed star formation history for the same galaxy population. We further demonstrate that this additional gas mass cannot be accounted for by cold gas delivered through minor and major mergers. We also consider the effects of gas outflows and gas recycling due to stellar evolution in these calculations. We argue that to sustain star formation at the observed rates there must be additional methods for increasing the cold gas mass, and that the likeliest method for establishing this supply of gas is by accretion from the intergalactic medium. We calculate that the average gas mass accretion rate into these massive galaxies between 1.5 < z < 3.0, is \dot{M} = 96+/-19 M_sol/yr after accounting for outflowing gas. We show that during this epoch, and for these very massive galaxies, 49+/-20% of baryonic mass assembly is a result of gas accretion and unresolved mergers. However, 66+/-20% of all star formation in this epoch is the result of gas accretion. This reveals that for the most massive galaxies at 1.5< z< 3 gas accretion is the dominant method for instigating new stellar mass assembly.