• The discovery of variable and transient sources is an essential product of synoptic surveys. The alert stream will require filtering for personalized criteria -- a process managed by a functionality commonly described as a Broker. In order to understand quantitatively the magnitude of the alert generation and Broker tasks, we have undertaken an analysis of the most numerous types of variable targets in the sky -- Galactic stars, QSOs, AGNs and asteroids. It is found that LSST will be capable of discovering ~10^5 high latitude |b| > 20 deg) variable stars per night at the beginning of the survey. (The corresponding number for |b| < 20 deg is orders of magnitude larger, but subject to caveats concerning extinction and crowding.) However, the number of new discoveries may well drop below 100/night within 2 years. The same analysis applied to GAIA clarifies the complementarity of the GAIA and LSST surveys. Discovery of variable galactic nuclei (AGNs) and Quasi Stellar Objects (QSOs) are each predicted to begin at ~3000 per night, and decrease by 50X over 4 years. SNe are expected at ~1100/night, and after several survey years will dominate the new variable discovery rate. LSST asteroid discoveries will start at > 10^5 per night, and if orbital determination has a 50% success rate per epoch, will drop below 1000/night within 2 years.
  • The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog (KEBC)describes 2165 eclipsing binaries identified in the 115 deg^2 Kepler Field based on observations from Kepler quarters Q0, Q1, and Q2. The periods in the KEBC are given in units of days out to six decimal places but no period errors are provided. We present the PEC (Period Error Calculator) algorithm which can be used to estimate the period errors of strictly periodic variables observed by the Kepler Mission. The PEC algorithm is based on propagation of error theory and assumes that observation of every light curve peak/minimum in a long time-series observation can be unambiguously identified. The PEC algorithm can be efficiently programmed using just a few lines of C computer language code. The PEC algorithm was used to develop a simple model which provides period error estimates for eclipsing binaries in the KEBC with periods less than 62.5 days. KEBC systems with periods >=62.5 days have KEBC period errors of about 0.0144 days. Periods and period errors of 7 eclipsing binary systems in the KEBC were measured using the NASA Exoplanet Archive Periodogram Service and compared to period errors estimated using the PEC algorithm.
  • We present the first secondary eclipse and phase curve observations for the highly eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 \mu m bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 3.6 and 4.5 \mu m data sets span an entire orbital period of HAT-P-2b, making them the longest continuous phase curve observations obtained to date and the first full-orbit observations of a planet with an eccentricity exceeding 0.2. We present an improved non-parametric method for removing the intrapixel sensitivity variations in Spitzer data at 3.6 and 4.5 \mu m that robustly maps position-dependent flux variations. We find that the peak in planetary flux occurs at 4.39+/-0.28, 5.84+/-0.39, and 4.68+/-0.37 hours after periapse passage with corresponding maxima in the planet/star flux ratio of 0.1138%+/-0.0089%, 0.1162%+/-0.0080%, and 0.1888%+/-0.0072% in the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 \mu m bands respectively. We compare our measured secondary eclipse depths to the predictions from a one-dimensional radiative transfer model, which suggests the possible presence of a transient day side inversion in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere near periapse. We also derive improved estimates for the system parameters, including its mass, radius, and orbital ephemeris. Our simultaneous fit to the transit, secondary eclipse, and radial velocity data allows us to determine the eccentricity and argument of periapse of HAT-P-2b's orbit with a greater precision than has been achieved for any other eccentric extrasolar planet. We also find evidence for a long-term linear trend in the radial velocity data. This trend suggests the presence of another substellar companion in the HAT-P-2 system, which could have caused HAT-P-2b to migrate inward to its present-day orbit via the Kozai mechanism.
  • We present a new computational approach to the inversion of solar photospheric Stokes polarization profiles, under the Milne-Eddington model, for vector magnetography. Our code, named GENESIS (GENEtic Stokes Inversion Strategy), employs multi-threaded parallel-processing techniques to harness the computing power of graphics processing units GPUs, along with algorithms designed to exploit the inherent parallelism of the Stokes inversion problem. Using a genetic algorithm (GA) engineered specifically for use with a GPU, we produce full-disc maps of the photospheric vector magnetic field from polarized spectral line observations recorded by the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) instrument. We show the advantages of pairing a population-parallel genetic algorithm with data-parallel GPU-computing techniques, and present an overview of the Stokes inversion problem, including a description of our adaptation to the GPU-computing paradigm. Full-disc vector magnetograms derived by this method are shown, using SOLIS/VSM data observed on 2008 March 28 at 15:45 UT.
  • I describe the performance of the CRBLASTER computational framework on a 350-MHz 49-core Maestro Development Board (MDB). The 49-core Interim Test Chip (ITC) was developed by the U.S. Government and is based on the intellectual property of the 64-core TILE64 processor of the Tilera Corporation. The Maestro processor is intended for use in the high radiation environments found in space; the ITC was fabricated using IBM 90-nm CMOS 9SF technology and Radiation-Hardening-by-Design (RHDB) rules. CRBLASTER is a parallel-processing cosmic-ray rejection application based on a simple computational framework that uses the high-performance computing industry standard Message Passing Interface (MPI) library. CRBLASTER was designed to be used by research scientists to easily port image-analysis programs based on embarrassingly-parallel algorithms to a parallel-processing environment such as a multi-node Beowulf cluster or multi-core processors using MPI. I describe my experience of porting CRBLASTER to the 64-core TILE64 processor, the Maestro simulator, and finally the 49-core Maestro processor itself. Performance comparisons using the ITC are presented between emulating all floating-point operations in software and doing all floating point operations with hardware assist from an IEEE-754 compliant Aurora FPU (floating point unit) that is attached to each of the 49 cores. Benchmarking of the CRBLASTER computational framework using the memory-intensive L.A.COSMIC cosmic ray rejection algorithm and a computational-intensive Poisson noise generator reveal subtleties of the Maestro hardware design. Lastly, I describe the importance of using real scientific applications during the testing phase of next-generation computer hardware; complex real-world scientific applications can stress hardware in novel ways that may not necessarily be revealed while executing simple applications or unit tests.
  • We observed two fields near M32 with the Advanced Camera for Surveys/High Resolution Channel (ACS/HRC) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The main field, F1, is 1.8 arcmin from the center of M32; the second field, F2, constrains the M31 background, and is 5.4 arcmin distant. Each field was observed for 16-orbits in each of the F435W (narrow B) and F555W (narrow V) filters. The duration of the observations allowed RR Lyrae stars and other short-period variables to be detected. A population of RR Lyrae stars determined to belong to M32 would prove the existence of an ancient population in that galaxy, a subject of some debate. We detected 17 RR Lyrae variables in F1 and 14 in F2. A 1-sigma upper limit of 6 RR Lyrae variables belonging to M32 is inferred from these two fields alone. Use of our two ACS/WFC parallel fields provides better constraints on the M31 background, however, and implies that $7_{-3}^{+4}$ (68 % confidence interval) RR Lyrae variables in F1 belong to M32. We have therefore found evidence for an ancient population in M32. It seems to be nearly indistinguishable from the ancient population of M31. The RR Lyrae stars in the F1 and F2 fields have indistinguishable mean V-band magnitudes, mean periods, distributions in the Bailey diagram and ratios of RRc to RR(tot) types. However, the color distributions in the two fields are different, with a population of red RRab variables in F1 not seen in F2. We suggest that these might be identified with the detected M32 RR Lyrae population, but the small number of stars rules out a definitive claim.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope observations taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Channel of two fields near M32 - between four and six kpc from the center of M31. The data cover a time baseline sufficient for the identification and characterization of 681 RR Lyrae variables of which 555 are ab-type and 126 are c-type. The mean magnitude of these stars is <V>=25.29 +/- 0.05 where the uncertainty combines both the random and systematic errors. The location of the stars in the Bailey Diagram and the ratio of c-type RR Lyraes to all types are both closer to RR Lyraes in Oosterhoff type I globular clusters in the Milky Way as compared with Oosterhoff II clusters. The mean periods of the ab-type and c-type RR Lyraes are <P(ab)>=0.557 +/- 0.003 and <P(c)>=0.327 +/- 0.003, respectively, where the uncertainties in each case represent the standard error of the mean. When the periods and amplitudes of the ab-type RR Lyraes in our sample are interpreted in terms of metallicity, we find the metallicity distribution function to be indistinguishable from a Gaussian with a peak at <[Fe/H]>=-1.50 +/- 0.02, where the quoted uncertainty is the standard error of the mean. Using a relation between RR Lyrae luminosity and metallicity along with a reddening of E(B-V) = 0.08 +/- 0.03, we find a distance modulus of (m-M)o=24.46 +/- 0.11 for M31. We examine the radial metallicity gradient in the environs of M31 using published values for the bulge and halo of M31 as well as the abundances of its dwarf spheroidal companions and globular clusters. In this context, we conclude that the RR Lyraes in our two fields are more likely to be halo objects rather than associated with the bulge or disk of M31, in spite of the fact that they are located at 4-6 kpc in projected distance from the center.
  • The key features of the MATPHOT algorithm for precise and accurate stellar photometry and astrometry using discrete Point Spread Functions are described. A discrete Point Spread Function (PSF) is a sampled version of a continuous PSF which describes the two-dimensional probability distribution of photons from a point source (star) just above the detector. The shape information about the photon scattering pattern of a discrete PSF is typically encoded using a numerical table (matrix) or a FITS image file. Discrete PSFs are shifted within an observational model using a 21-pixel-wide damped sinc function and position partial derivatives are computed using a five-point numerical differentiation formula. Precise and accurate stellar photometry and astrometry is achieved with undersampled CCD observations by using supersampled discrete PSFs that are sampled 2, 3, or more times more finely than the observational data. The precision and accuracy of the MATPHOT algorithm is demonstrated by using the C-language MPD code to analyze simulated CCD stellar observations; measured performance is compared with a theoretical performance model. Detailed analysis of simulated Next Generation Space Telescope observations demonstrate that millipixel relative astrometry and millimag photometric precision is achievable with complicated space-based discrete PSFs. For further information about MATPHOT and MPD, including source code and documentation, see http://www.noao.edu/staff/mighell/matphot
  • I investigate the use of Pearson's chi-square statistic, the Maximum Likelihood Ratio statistic for Poisson distributions, and the chi-square-gamma statistic (Mighell 1999, ApJ, 518, 380) for the determination of the goodness-of-fit between theoretical models and low-count Poisson-distributed data. I demonstrate that these statistics should not be used to determine the goodness-of-fit with data values of 10 or less. I modify the chi-square-gamma statistic for the purpose of improving its goodness-of-fit performance. I demonstrate that the modified chi-square-gamma statistic performs (nearly) like an ideal chi-square statistic for the determination of goodness-of-fit with low-count data. On average, for correct (true) models, the mean value of modified chi-square-gamma statistic is equal to the number of degrees of freedom (nu) and its variance is 2*nu --- like the chi-square distribution for nu degrees of freedom. Probabilities for modified chi-square-gamma goodness-of-fit values can be calculated with the incomplete gamma function. I give a practical demonstration showing how the modified chi-square-gamma statistic can be used in experimental astrophysics by analyzing simulated X-ray observations of a weak point source (signal-to-noise ratio of 5.2; 40 photons spread over 317 pixels) on a noisy background (0.06 photons per pixel). Accurate estimates (95% confidence intervals/limits) of the location and intensity of the X-ray point source are determined.
  • Astrometry, on the International Celestial Reference Frame (epoch J2000.0), is presented for the Walker (1994, PASP, 106, 828) stars in the Omega Centauri (= NGC 5139 = C1323-1472) Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field/Planetary Camera (WF/PC) calibration field of Harris et al. (1993, AJ, 105, 1196). Harris et al. stars were first identified on a WFPC2 observation of the omega Cen HST calibration field. Relative astrometry of the Walker stars in this field was then obtained using Walker's CCD positions and astrometry derived using the STSDAS METRIC task on the positions of the Harris et al. stars on the WFPC2 observation. Finally, the relative astrometry, which was based on the HST Guide Star Catalog, is placed on the International Celestial Reference Frame with astrometry from the USNO-A2.0 catalog. An ASCII text version of the astrometric data of the Walker stars in the omega Cen HST calibration field is available electronically in the online version of the article.
  • Applying the standard weighted mean formula, [sum_i {n_i sigma^{-2}_i}] / [sum_i {sigma^{-2}_i}], to determine the weighted mean of data, n_i, drawn from a Poisson distribution, will, on average, underestimate the true mean by ~1 for all true mean values larger than ~3 when the common assumption is made that the error of the ith observation is sigma_i = max(sqrt{n_i},1). This small, but statistically significant offset, explains the long-known observation that chi-square minimization techniques which use the modified Neyman's chi-square statistic, chi^2_{N} equiv sum_i (n_i-y_i)^2 / max(n_i,1), to compare Poisson-distributed data with model values, y_i, will typically predict a total number of counts that underestimates the true total by about 1 count per bin. Based on my finding that the weighted mean of data drawn from a Poisson distribution can be determined using the formula [sum_i [n_i + min(n_i,1)] (n_i+1)^{-1}] / [sum_i (n_i+1)^{-1}], I propose that a new chi-square statistic, chi^2_gamma equiv sum_i [n_i + min(n_i,1) - y_i]^2 / [n_i + 1], should always be used to analyze Poisson-distributed data in preference to the modified Neyman's chi-square statistic. I demonstrate the power and usefulness of chi-square-gamma minimization by using two statistical fitting techniques and five chi-square statistics to analyze simulated X-ray power-law 15-channel spectra with large and small counts per bin. I show that chi-square-gamma minimization with the Levenberg-Marquardt or Powell's method can produce excellent results (mean slope errors <=3%) with spectra having as few as 25 total counts.
  • We present our analysis of Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 observations in F555W (~V) and F814W (~I) of the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The resulting V vs (V-I) color-magnitude diagrams reach V ~ 27.1 mag. The reddening of Carina is estimated to be E(V-I) = 0.08 +- 0.02 mag. A new estimate of the distance modulus of Carina, (m-M)_0 = 19.87 +- 0.11 mag, has been derived primarily from existing photometry in the literature. The apparent distance moduli in V and I were determined to be (m-M)_V = 20.05 +- 0.11 mag and (m-M)_I = 19.98 +- 0.12 mag, respectively. These determinations assumed that Carina has a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.9 +- 0.2 dex. This space-based observation, when combined with previous ground-based observations, is consistent with (but does not necessarily prove) the following star formation scenario. The Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy formed its old stellar population in a short burst (=< 3 Gyr) at about the same time the Milky Way formed its globular clusters. The dominant burst of intermediate-age star formation then began in the central region of the galaxy where stars formed for several billion years before the process of star formation became efficient enough in the outer regions of the galaxy to allow for the formation of large numbers of stars. There has been negligible star formation during the last few billion years. This observation provides evidence that at least some dwarf galaxies can have complex global star formation histories with local variations of the rate of star formation as a function of time and position within the galaxy.